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NEWS
May 4, 1993
More than a few baseball fans in Baltimore believe that if a plane crashed into the upper deck at Oriole Park, as happened at Memorial Stadium after a Colts game 17 years ago, many spectators wouldn't notice: They'd be too engrossed in the stock tables or in a cellular phone conversation. Yes, the new ballpark has attracted a lot of corporate customers and other ticket-buyers who don't live and breathe baseball. Many die-hards grouse that the full houses Camden Yards attracts nightly aren't half as loud as the Memorial Stadium stadium crowds of yesteryear.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
As tens of thousands of Baltimore sports fans packed downtown to watch country music star Keith Urban kick off the NFL season and the Orioles' win at home, some of the lingering exasperation that the Ravens were playing out of town faded away. "It was frustrating that the Orioles couldn't move their game," said Kevin Williams, who was celebrating his 53rd birthday at the harbor with friends. "But this is the next best thing. And it's free, you know. " Over at Camden Yards, some Orioles fans were ducking out early to catch the Ravens on TV. But manager Buck Showalter didn't seem to mind.
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SPORTS
June 9, 1996
Dislikes what he seesI thought that I disliked the [Ravens] name until I saw the colors and logo. Is it too late to send them back to Cleveland?Mark S. WebnerBel AirDiMaggio's injuryReading Brad Snyder's article about Joe DiMaggio's move to first base reminds me of a few things.The real reason DiMaggio retired at age 36 after 16 years of playing center field for the Yankees was an injury.During the World Series against the Giants in 1951, DiMaggio, in his effortless stride, was going for a fly ball when Mickey Mantle, playing his first season in right field, collided with him. It injured his leg badly enough that he left the game.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
As she stood near a skywalk leading into the Baltimore Convention Center, Holly Fawcett, a 43-year-old wife and mother from Yorktown, Va., watched as they all flooded past. The men in pink tutus. The women wearing wings and unicorn horns. The teens from places as far away as Colorado and Connecticut, sporting horses' tails, carrying stuffed ponies and high-fiving as though they've known each other forever. It was Day Two of BronyCon 2013, the "Bronies" were streaming in by the thousand, and Fawcett, in run-of-the-mill T-shirt and jeans, gazed in wonder.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer Staff writer Jon Morgan contributed to this article | April 8, 1993
With 160 games remaining, the Orioles already have topped the Toronto Blue Jays in one race: consecutive sellouts.Last night's sellout crowd of 46,447 -- the largest to see a game at Oriole Park -- marked the 61st straight time the ballpark has been sold out, setting a major-league record.The Orioles have sold out every game since May 23, 1992, and have topped single-game attendance marks in their first two games of this season.Orioles president Larry Lucchino said: "It's a great tribute to the fans, to the players and to the ballpark.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 23, 1999
The Browns' return to the NFL is the feel-good story of the season, with fans across the country sympathizing with the fans in Cleveland who had to endure three seasons without a team.But the story is entering a sympathy-free zone this week, with the Browns coming to Baltimore to play the Ravens at Camden Yards.Fans in Baltimore don't want to hear about those three long, painful years in Cleveland, not when they had to endure a dozen long, painful seasons without a team after the Colts left for Indianapolis in 1984.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | November 11, 2007
Once word reached Aubrey Huff that comments he made during a radio appearance last week brought waves of criticism from Orioles fans, he immediately came up with a theory to explain all the unwanted attention headed his way. "It must be a slow news day," he said. In a telephone interview with The Sun yesterday, Huff said he didn't mean to disrespect the city of Baltimore or its residents when he referred to it as a "horses - -" town during Thursday's 90-minute segment with Bubba The Love Sponge on Sirius Satellite Radio.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | December 27, 1994
The holiday season is a time for giving, but all anyone in Baltimore can think about is taking, taking, taking.Specifically, taking the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, the same way Indianapolis took the Baltimore Colts a decade ago.This isn't to suggest that Peter Angelos should withdraw his $200 million offer for the Bucs -- it's too late for that now.Just recognize we're down in the gutter. Down there with Irsay. Down there with Indianapolis. Down there with the entire, stinking NFL.Charm City? Please.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | November 6, 1993
Proud to be your Bud? Not if Stan "the Fan" Charles has his way.The WCBM radio talk show host yesterday announced a protest that targets Anheuser-Busch products in Baltimore's bars and taverns, where patrons will be encouraged to just say no to the beers that made St. Louis famous -- and gave that city a perceived edge in the professional football expansion derby.Ask for a Budweiser, Michelob, Busch, Natural Light or even a non-alcoholic O'Doul's, and your favorite barkeep might suggest that it's time for a change.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 24, 1992
What Baltimore didn't do is build the perfect ballpark. The bow-takers are everywhere, including Herbert Belgrad, Bruce Hoffman, Larry Lucchino, Don Schaefer and even Mickey Steinberg. The line forms to the right for others eager to join the parade to the podium.We reluctantly admit to being disappointed over the final ballpark result because, after so much trumpeting and enormous construction costs, the facility is no better than the third-best in major league baseball, behind Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles and SkyDome in Toronto.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2013
Prior to The Game on Sunday, Anthony Mitchell made a bold forecast on Facebook. The former Raven posted photos of both his 2000 jersey and his Super Bowl ring with this decree: Time to get another one. The Ravens obliged. Why did Mitchell share his entry? "Once a Raven, always a Raven," said Mitchell, 38, a former defensive back. "Play for that team and you always have a special bond with Baltimore. " Ever since the Super Bowl , folks who know Kim Herring have sidled up, pumped his hand and offered their congratulations.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | August 3, 2012
Former Ravens running back Jamal Lewis, in Baltimore to sign autographs at the National Sports Collectors Convention, said Friday that his arrest earlier this week in Atlanta for child abandonment, a misdemeanor, was caused by a hearing he did not attend. “It was not about an abandonment issue, it was not about a kid issue,” he said. “It was the fact that, honestly, I didn't show up for a hearing to defend myself and everything else. But, like I said in my statement, you know, I've never been a bad father.
EXPLORE
By Loni Ingraham and Pat van den Beemt | August 25, 2011
Don Gerding of Rodgers Forge couldn't believe it when he heard the news that former Orioles pitcher Mike Flanagan had died. "It was upsetting," he said. Gerding worked with the former Oriole pitcher the 1970s and 80s, when Flanagan did some rep work in the printing and engraving business for Dempsey & Carroll while he was still pitching at Memorial Stadium. "He was a 33rd Street phenomenon," Gerding said. Flanagan, a Cy Young Award winner who became a television announcer and top executive with the club, died from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound Wednesday afternoon on his property in Sparks, according to sources with knowledge of the investigation into his death.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | November 11, 2007
Once word reached Aubrey Huff that comments he made during a radio appearance last week brought waves of criticism from Orioles fans, he immediately came up with a theory to explain all the unwanted attention headed his way. "It must be a slow news day," he said. In a telephone interview with The Sun yesterday, Huff said he didn't mean to disrespect the city of Baltimore or its residents when he referred to it as a "horses - -" town during Thursday's 90-minute segment with Bubba The Love Sponge on Sirius Satellite Radio.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 23, 1999
The Browns' return to the NFL is the feel-good story of the season, with fans across the country sympathizing with the fans in Cleveland who had to endure three seasons without a team.But the story is entering a sympathy-free zone this week, with the Browns coming to Baltimore to play the Ravens at Camden Yards.Fans in Baltimore don't want to hear about those three long, painful years in Cleveland, not when they had to endure a dozen long, painful seasons without a team after the Colts left for Indianapolis in 1984.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Jamie Stiehm and Gerard Shields and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1999
The word "Cajun" starts with a "c" and has five letters, just like the word "crazy."That's how several hundred people eating spicy Cajun food and twirling to zydeco music in sweltering 95-degree weather yesterday appeared at the annual Gumbofest in Crownsville.But as anyone who savors gumbo, jambalaya and spinning to raucous accordion blues will tell you: It's never too hot to zydeco."They're die-hards," said Carlton Shutt of Premier Events, operator of the gumbo festival at Anne Arundel Fairgrounds.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | February 16, 1994
This was Mayor Kurt Schmoke at his best . . . articulate and analytical (something his predecessor wasn't). He welcomed a Canadian Football League team to Baltimore yesterday and said he was happy Memorial Stadium would be flying the flags of two countries.It was just the perfect thing to say on a memorable and, hopefully, what may become a historic occasion.Schmoke gives Baltimore an edge when talking sports. He played football and understands what the game is all about, as opposed to Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who is out to lunch when it comes to comprehending what it takes to organize a franchise.
SPORTS
November 16, 1997
Miller time is nowFinally, the Orioles have hired a manager to take them to the final dance. And I am grateful. Even Ray Miller hinted that there were mistakes made by Davey Johnson concerning bunts and stealing bases. This is just the kind of manager the Orioles need. A manager who manages based on the situation at hand. Ray knows you have to bunt in a game in which your pitcher is throwing a one- or two-hitter. Davey didn't. Ray knows that waiting for the three-run homer isn't going to win in the postseason.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Paul McMullen and Jon Morgan and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Christian Ewell and Bill Free contributed to this article | September 7, 1998
With equal parts celebration and defiance, a sellout crowd of Baltimore's football faithful yesterday consecrated the Ravens' new, downtown home -- a red brick stadium some thought would never get built for a team some thought would never play here."
SPORTS
November 16, 1997
Miller time is nowFinally, the Orioles have hired a manager to take them to the final dance. And I am grateful. Even Ray Miller hinted that there were mistakes made by Davey Johnson concerning bunts and stealing bases. This is just the kind of manager the Orioles need. A manager who manages based on the situation at hand. Ray knows you have to bunt in a game in which your pitcher is throwing a one- or two-hitter. Davey didn't. Ray knows that waiting for the three-run homer isn't going to win in the postseason.
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