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By Jon Margolis | August 14, 1991
AS WILL be demonstrated presently, though not now, this is an English lesson.It has been inspired by being put on hold, always an inspirational experience, during which a very nice recorded lady (well, recorded voice, which seemed nice) kept saying, "All our lines are presently busy."And to think that she works for a university. The University of Toronto, yet, up there in Canada, where, one could hope, the Queen's English is taken more seriously than down here in the breakaway colonies.Actually, this phone call does not entirely account for the inspiration.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
In a letter to his father, a 25-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart declared: "I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. … I simply follow my own feelings. " This self-confidence is just one of the revered composer's traits explored in Peter Shaffer's play "Amadeus," which Center Stage is reviving for its season-opener. A few other Mozart characteristics, including behavior still not considered kosher in polite society, also pepper this colorful mix of fact and fiction.
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NEWS
By Barbara Evans and Barbara Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2005
For 16 years, Clarence Haskett's day job has involved managing traffic flow during roadwork construction for the Maryland State Highway Administration. But in the evening, during the Ravens and Orioles seasons, the traffic engineer transforms into "Fancy Clancy," the "hardest-working beer vendor." He can sling two cartons of 16-ounce beers up stadium steps while holding a wad of money in his hands and yelling, "Who's due for a cold brew?" At a recent Orioles game, Haskett had the motion down to a science as he worked between Sections 10 and 26 behind first base.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
Regarding a reader's question about why police officers shoot to kill, Baltimore City police and most other departments train there officers to shoot at the target's center of mass, which is the largest part of the body and where the bullet has the most stopping power ( "Why do police always shoot to kill?" Aug. 29). Shooting at the center of mass does not always result in the suspect being killed. Officers assigned to specialized units such as SWAT teams and given additional firearms training may attempt to shoot a suspect in the leg or arm. However, these units are usually the last ones on the scene and most police involved shootings are over in a matter of minutes.
FEATURES
By ELSA KLENSCH and ELSA KLENSCH,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 6, 1996
Last year I married a handsome, successful lawyer I met skiing. But after our whirlwind romance I discovered there's a downside. He has an "A"-type personality and can be quite manic. When we travel, he insists that we pack only carry-on luggage so we can run off the plane and catch a cab.Before we married, I always changed into something pretty when I went out to dinner. Now with my luggage restrictions I can't. What can I wear that's elegant enough for a fancy restaurant and functional enough for a 747?
FEATURES
By Linda Susan Dudley and Linda Susan Dudley,Copley News Service | May 13, 1992
"My 3-year-old son loves to go grocery shopping," says the young mother, "because he gets a chance to check out all the decorated cakes. We always have to go to the bakery first."The fancy cake is an attraction that starts at a young age and stays with us through fanciful teen birthday centerpieces, multitiered wedding confections and retirement party sheet cakes.Cake-decorating expert Linda Bunn has an explanation for our fond affection for these frosted expressions."People like fancy cakes because it's an art form that's not too expensive, can be easily personalized to match someone's personality or hobbies and can be enjoyed by everyone," says Ms. Bunn.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 5, 1992
The Victorians used to say the sun never sets on the British Empire. These days, it never sets on Andrew Lloyd Webber.Mr. Webber is his own empire, a commercial colossus whose songs sit astride the pop musical world the way the English navy did the 19th-century one. In Germany, a Teutonic Elvis Presley figure called Greaseball sings in Lloyd Webber's "Starlight Express" in the town of Bochum. In the United States, Barbra Streisand and everybody else who was singing "Send in the Clowns" a generation ago have recorded "Memory" from Lloyd Webber's "Cats."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1994
After two close calls, state preservationists finally have won their battle to buy Clocker's Fancy, the St. Mary's County estate that may contain the oldest wood-frame residence in Maryland.Owners of the 19-acre waterfront parcel next to Historic St. Mary's City, the site of Maryland's first capital, agreed yesterday to sell the property to the state for $350,000.The agreement came after a series of events that included the auction company chipping in $20,000 to lift the state's $330,000 bid past a last-minute competing bid of $340,000.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1996
The words "staid," "subtle," and "formal" are probably what come to mind when people think of American decorative arts of the 1700s. But there was a time, around the end of the 18th century, according to antiquarian Sumpter Priddy III, when everything from settees to symphonies got "wild, abstract and colorful."Instead of Sheraton, Williamsburg, Mozart, think of red paint, kaleidoscopes, Beethoven. For a time, the sober rationalism of the 18th century gave way to exuberant imagination. Quilts and plates showed up with bright geometric decoration.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 15, 1998
"NYPD Blue" is absolutely in the zone. Outstanding episodes seem to just keep coming this season.From the goodbye-Jimmy-Smits story arc to the hello-Rick-Schroder episodes, the consistent quality of this venerable cop drama is remarkable.And, tonight, comes another powerful and profound hour as Detective Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz) and his boss, Lt. Arthur Fancy (James McDaniel), go at it over matters of race. And I mean go at -- fists flying in the men's room in a scene that will leave your heart pounding almost as hard as those of these two middle-aged cops.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 10, 2013
Federico Lopez is proud of the food of his hometown. That town, Mexico City, should be proud of him, too. With his wife, Maria, Lopez owns Fiesta Mexicana, a tiny, friendly Rosedale restaurant dedicated to cooking authentic Mexico City cuisine. As the capital of Mexico and the country's largest city, Mexico City draws culinary inspiration from the entire country. The resulting cuisine feels familiar to the American palate, but fresh. Diners will recognize the tortilla-plus-meat-and-sauce concoctions on their plates; it looks similar to the food at any run-of-the-mill Mexican place in America.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
With its Page 3 headline in the Real Estate Section about the sale of retired Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis' Florida home, The Sun continues to laud a professional athlete who leaves damaged business owners in his wake ("Live like Ray? It'll cost about $5 million," March 17)? Mr. Lewis' failed MVP Lanes in Hunt Valley got him favorable coverage in the paper twice, while contractors were so damaged that the proceeds from the sale of his home may not even cover their losses. Dennis R. McCartney, Dundalk
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Yesterday, I sent this message to the newsroom staff: We will not be using the word “Frankenstorm” in coverage of Hurricane Sandy, because the term trivializes a serious and potentially deadly event. It's acceptable in direct quotes, but even there we shouldn't overdo it. In doing so, we were following the lead of Phil Blanchard at Testy Copy Editors, who had posted that advice on Facebook, and CNN, which had adopted the same policy. The advisory to the staff was not a flat ban, as you see from the mention of quotes, and Frankenstorm is a word that people are using, and using as an SEO term to find information.
NEWS
June 16, 2012
As a financial matter, perhaps it's no big deal that MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakehas a $562.39 telephone sitting on her desk. It and the five other touch screen, video phones the city bought recently amount to 0.0001 percent of Baltimore's $2.8 billion budget. Their cost wouldn't be enough to keep open a fire company or a recreation center or to roll back city property taxes. But as a symbol, the phone is a problem for City Hall. It contributes to residents' suspicions that their tax dollars are being squandered, and it makes the mayor look extravagantly out of touch with the concerns of most of her constituents.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
The Preakness is, let's face it, the dark horse on the nation's party planning circuit. After all, the second leg of the Triple Crown is squeezed between its more challenging and prestigious cousins, the Kentucky Derby and the Belmont Stakes. And, it's held in proudly fashion-averse Baltimore. Nonetheless, there are a few pioneering socialites and trailblazing doyennes living in states such as Kentucky and Pennsylvania and New Jersey. For them, the Preakness' underdog status practically demands a celebration — and the more fancy hats and black-eyed Susan centerpieces the better.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
John Cusack didn't come to Baltimore when preparing to play Edgar Allan Poe in "The Raven. " In fact, he says he's never been here. But when asked whether this city, Boston, Philadelphia, New York or Richmond has dibs on the author's reputation, Cusack, 45, answers without hesitation. "Baltimore!," he said. "Is that even a question?" For Cusack, the only other city that comes close to having a hold on Poe is Boston. After all, he was born there. "But I think people generally would have to concede that Poe is a Baltimore guy," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 1, 1998
Shaw memorialThere are three days left to view the dramatic installation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens' "Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts Fifty-fourth Regiment," the monumental sculpture depicting the first African-American infantry unit from the North to fight for the Union during the Civil War. The installation at the National Gallery of Art in Washington closes after visiting hours Sunday for about seven months while skylights are replaced...
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Now I really feel old. A friend of mine used to call the grocery store at the Rotunda the "Flirt Giant. " And it was true, back when I moved here about 25 years ago: You got the sense people were trolling the aisles there for more than Lean Cuisines. It was bad enough that over the years the Flirt Giant aged out — if there were still shoppers on the prowl there, they also were probably on walkers. The Rotunda itself was sagging a bit, slowly some of its smaller shops, but as long as the Giant anchored one end and the movie theater the other, the mall seemed to still have a heartbeat.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
What has three bedrooms, three and a half baths and a whole lot of Baltimore star appeal? Michael Phelps' Fells Point condo. And it looks like it could be yours if you've got a spare couple million. The listing was spotted (with the help of Sun reporter Jamie Smith Hopkins) on the website of chi-chi Realtor Heidi Krauss. (The news was reported in strangely mysterious fashion by The Real Estalker blog earlier this week.) Phelps name is not mentioned in the listing. But the address is. And according to property records, it's the very Fell Street Michael Phelps bought in October 2007 for $1.69 million.
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