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By SHERRY GRAHAM | March 7, 1995
Cal Ripken Jr. was there. So were Kristi Yamaguchi, Mickey Mantle and Michael Jordan. Even Babe Ruth swung a bat or two.I saw these famous people and many others at the "wax museum" recently at Freedom Elementary School.During February, Freedom third-graders studied biographies, reading about famous people in sports, politics, science, music, art, literature and medicine.After researching the life of a famous person and writing a report to show what they had learned, the students became the historical figures during the wax museum event.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 16, 2014
It's your fault Justin Bieber is a jerk. That's the contention of attorney Roy Black, who is defending the 20-year-old singer on a DUI charge stemming from a Jan. 23 arrest in Miami Beach. Mr. Black spoke to reporters this month as video of Mr. Bieber's deposition in the case of an alleged assault by one of his bodyguards -- you can't keep this young man's legal woes straight without a scorecard -- was making the rounds on the Internet. It was not a pretty picture. Mr. Bieber comes across as a twerp so snotty and insolent even Mother Teresa would want to smack him. It's been suggested that opposing counsel baited Mr. Bieber by asking provocative questions unrelated to the matter at hand, such as his on-and-off relationship with Selena Gomez.
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FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | August 25, 1992
What do actors, politicians, athletes, TV journalists and guppies have in common?They all have to learn how to deal with life in a fishbowl. Peering eyes. Alert ears. Probing questions."Fame is a double-edged sword," said Charles Figley, a psychologist and family therapy professor at Florida State University. "On the one hand, fame is a measure of your worth as a performer. But on the other hand, fame jeopardizes your privacy, freedom and safety; and the situation is much worse when your young children's lives are at stake."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2011
The turbo-charged guy with a head full of swirling salt-and-pepper hair sitting at the lower end of Grand Cru busily sketching most Saturday afternoons, dressed in faded blue jeans, bumpy tweed sport coat, Irish country farmers vest, shirt and tie, is the loquacious Kevin O'Malley. The Belvedere Square bar is O'Malley's home away from home, living room or branch office-studio. He comes here to think, draw, laugh, pick up a few ideas while quaffing a few cold ones with his usual cadre of boon companions.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
"Palimpsest." by Gore Vidal. He calls it a memoir, not an autobiography. He takes great delight in setting everybody straight. It's very amusing - with vignettes about all kinds of famous people.Oh, it's a gossipy little thing, I'd recommend it if you happen to be interested in the 1950s and 1960s world of sophistication.- Nona Porter, a first-grade teacher at Grace and St. Peter's school in Baltimore. She is a mother of five and grandmother of nine children.
FEATURES
January 19, 2000
"The book I read was `Famous Explorers for Boys and Girls' by Ramon P. Coffman. This book tells about explorers. It tells who they were and about their search for knowledge. It also tells about adventures and all the famous people. This book should be read by young people because it tells about our history." -- John Robinson, Norbel Elementary The Sun invites its young readers to send in their book reviews, and we will print them on this page or on sunspot.net, our place on the Internet.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times News Service | October 23, 1999
All of us say stupid things. Luckily, there usually aren't tape recorders or videocams around to capture them. But politicians and celebrities, which these days are increasingly difficult to tell apart, aren't quite so lucky.Two books memorialize what happens when celebrities and politicians stray from their scripted remarks. The books, compiled by Ross and Kathryn Petras, are cleverly titled "The Stupidest Things Ever Said by Politicians" (Pocket Books, 1999) and "Stupid Celebrities: Over 500 of the Most Idiotic Things Ever Said by Famous People" (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 1998)
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 16, 2014
It's your fault Justin Bieber is a jerk. That's the contention of attorney Roy Black, who is defending the 20-year-old singer on a DUI charge stemming from a Jan. 23 arrest in Miami Beach. Mr. Black spoke to reporters this month as video of Mr. Bieber's deposition in the case of an alleged assault by one of his bodyguards -- you can't keep this young man's legal woes straight without a scorecard -- was making the rounds on the Internet. It was not a pretty picture. Mr. Bieber comes across as a twerp so snotty and insolent even Mother Teresa would want to smack him. It's been suggested that opposing counsel baited Mr. Bieber by asking provocative questions unrelated to the matter at hand, such as his on-and-off relationship with Selena Gomez.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2002
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - Reminders of Marilyn Monroe's short but glamorous life are everywhere at the penthouse offices of CMG Worldwide Inc. There is a bronze bust of the starlet, a cardboard cutout and several oil paintings. A wig and dresses worn by her are displayed in a glass case. And, visitors are invariably told, the office suite was once used by Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, who made Monroe his first centerfold. It is not surprising that CMG would pay homage to the departed starlet.
FEATURES
September 7, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/Caricature Zone is available in which languages?Tibet is under which country's occupation?Where would you find a biting bullet ant? (Go to http://www.orkin.com/danger/ to find out.)FUNNY FACESDo your ears stick out? Maybe you have a goofy haircut. Well these are the kinds of things a caricature artist loves. Caricature artists draw cartoon-like pictures of real people by exaggerating the features that make them look unique.
TOPIC
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2005
BEING the editor of the Perspective section of The Sun was the best job I ever had on the paper. Why? Maybe because during the three years I put out the section, I learned something about the truly venerable newspaper I devoted 32 years of my life to, and something about myself. When I returned in 1975 after three years as The Sun's correspondent in Brazil, I wanted to go back to my job on The Evening Sun's editorial page. The managing editor of The Sun, Paul Banker, wanted me in the Washington bureau.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2002
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - Reminders of Marilyn Monroe's short but glamorous life are everywhere at the penthouse offices of CMG Worldwide Inc. There is a bronze bust of the starlet, a cardboard cutout and several oil paintings. A wig and dresses worn by her are displayed in a glass case. And, visitors are invariably told, the office suite was once used by Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, who made Monroe his first centerfold. It is not surprising that CMG would pay homage to the departed starlet.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
Through the artwork of Howard County students, the first meeting between famous people such as Fred Astaire and Count Basie is depicted in papier-mache figures, while puppets of Joan Crawford and Bette Davis stand together for the first time on a stage in front of an adoring audience. Nearly 400 pieces of such artwork from county kindergartners to high school seniors will be displayed at Howard County Center for the Arts in First Encounters: Students' Responses to Memorable Meetings. Opening tomorrow, the exhibit was inspired by First Encounters: A Book of Memorable Meetings by Nancy Caldwell Sorel and illustrated by her husband, Edward Sorel, and features 65 meetings between famous people.
NEWS
December 14, 2001
THE NON-STIMULUS tax cut looks worse as the White House pares the legitimate business of government to pay for programs made necessary by homeland defense. One of the strangest cuts is the Office of Management and Budget's proposal to save $45 million by suspending renovation of two Smithsonian Institution museums that convey the American idea to visitors from home and abroad. When Americans are coming together, waving the flag, singing "America the Beautiful" and revisiting their history, nothing mocks the national purpose more than keeping the American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery closed for extra years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
By now bookstores are so crammed with bad memoirs that the late literary editor Maxwell Perkins must be praying in his grave for an Alzheimer's pandemic. In some ways, the memoir has been to the last decade what the New Journalism was to the 1960s and '70s -- a definitive genre, a hybrid form, a craze even, of sorts. The memoir has come into its own at the end of the 20th century, serving as a benchmark of this generation's loathsome literary self-consciousness in much the same way as Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" and Tom Wolfe's "Radical Chic" were the baby-boomers' Bildungsromans.
FEATURES
January 19, 2000
"The book I read was `Famous Explorers for Boys and Girls' by Ramon P. Coffman. This book tells about explorers. It tells who they were and about their search for knowledge. It also tells about adventures and all the famous people. This book should be read by young people because it tells about our history." -- John Robinson, Norbel Elementary The Sun invites its young readers to send in their book reviews, and we will print them on this page or on sunspot.net, our place on the Internet.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1993
In addition to nuclear weapons and a slimmed-down ozone layer, the 20th century has brought the world a new kind of fame. It's faster, it's broader and it's shallower. It's the kind that's responsible for Elvis sightings, the "Geraldo" show and the idea that "superstar" is a valid career goal.As the year 2000 approaches, fame itself is becoming famous. Who better to discuss the dynamics of fame in the 20th century than seven famous people, who gathered Monday night at the Joseph Papp Public Theater for what the panel's moderator, Clive James, promised would be "a sharply contested yet shapely symposium"?
TOPIC
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2005
BEING the editor of the Perspective section of The Sun was the best job I ever had on the paper. Why? Maybe because during the three years I put out the section, I learned something about the truly venerable newspaper I devoted 32 years of my life to, and something about myself. When I returned in 1975 after three years as The Sun's correspondent in Brazil, I wanted to go back to my job on The Evening Sun's editorial page. The managing editor of The Sun, Paul Banker, wanted me in the Washington bureau.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times News Service | October 23, 1999
All of us say stupid things. Luckily, there usually aren't tape recorders or videocams around to capture them. But politicians and celebrities, which these days are increasingly difficult to tell apart, aren't quite so lucky.Two books memorialize what happens when celebrities and politicians stray from their scripted remarks. The books, compiled by Ross and Kathryn Petras, are cleverly titled "The Stupidest Things Ever Said by Politicians" (Pocket Books, 1999) and "Stupid Celebrities: Over 500 of the Most Idiotic Things Ever Said by Famous People" (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 1998)
FEATURES
September 7, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/Caricature Zone is available in which languages?Tibet is under which country's occupation?Where would you find a biting bullet ant? (Go to http://www.orkin.com/danger/ to find out.)FUNNY FACESDo your ears stick out? Maybe you have a goofy haircut. Well these are the kinds of things a caricature artist loves. Caricature artists draw cartoon-like pictures of real people by exaggerating the features that make them look unique.
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