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SPORTS
January 4, 2010
Alex Kovalev broke out of a long slump in a big way. The 36-year-old forward has taken his share of flak in his first season in Ottawa for failing to produce regularly, but on Sunday, Kovalev ended a 10-game scoring drought with a career-high four goals in the Senators' 7-4 victory over the visiting Philadelphia Flyers. "All I can say is that it's a good way to start 2010," said Kovalev, who added an assist. The goals were his first since he snapped a 16-game goal-less run with a hat trick on Dec. 12 against Carolina.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 21, 2013
During the Christmas season when many celebrate a unique and miraculous birth, what the late Pope John Paul II called "a culture of death" continues its march. Last week, the upper house of the Belgian Senate voted to extend a 2002 law legalizing euthanasia for adults so that it includes incurably ill children. The amended law will now have to be voted on by the Parliament's lower house, a vote expected to take place before elections in May, but if passed, writes The New York Times, children afflicted with "constant and unbearable physical suffering" and "equipped with a capacity for discernment" could then be legally euthanized in Belgium.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Schell | December 22, 1992
THE U.S. Marines -- outfitted in crisp desert uniforms (whose leopard-spotted, speckled pattern we got to know in local jTC boutiques after Desert Storm), festooned with equipment whose purposes we can only guess at, begoggled, supplied with infrared gadgets for seeing at night (television's latest trick is to show us Somalian scenes through night-vision), and manning the world's highest-tech military equipment -- have descended, in one of the oddest encounters of recent times, on Somalia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Jeanine Cummins wants more than anything in the world to give a voice to people who are unable to speak for themselves. In the past, she has spoken for family members. In her 2004 memoir, "A Rip in Heaven," Cummins spoke for her cousins, Julie and Robin Kerry, who were gang-raped and murdered in 1991. She spoke for her older brother, Tom, who also was hurt in that attack on a bridge outside St. Louis. "My cousin, Julie was a really gifted writer," says Cummins, 38, who grew up in Gaithersburg.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Waves of refugees arrive daily to Kenya, some having walked weeks through unforgiving desert with virtually no possessions, and yet local relief workers report optimism among the millions threatened by the historic famine and drought spreading through the Horn of Africa. "Everyone looks hungry and wiped out," said Bruce White, a Catholic Relief Services adviser who returned earlier this month from Kenya. "But there is a sense of hope because there is help. I asked one man what he wanted here and he said 'peace.'" Jonathan Ernst, a Baltimore freelance photojournalist, reached the refugee camps in eastern Kenya last week and is reporting to Lutheran World Relief.
NEWS
By Jane Perlez and Jane Perlez,New York Times News Service | August 16, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- The famine in Somalia could have been mitigated if the United Nations had dispatched relief experts months ago instead of relying on a small crew of junior staff members in the country, a senior U.N. official has said."
NEWS
By Lisa Heldke | November 25, 1992
IT'S Thanksgiving in the United States while, in Somalia, 2 million people are in danger of starvation.Typically, such a devastating famine prompts Americans to respond generously, if belatedly; once we actually start to see people dying on television, we send money. So at this time of year we often feel compelled to write an extra check to a famine relief organization at about the same time we write an extra-large check to the grocery store.The crisis in Somalia, however, is not being billed as a "typical" famine.
NEWS
By David Snyder | September 19, 2000
NAIROBI -- Racked by violence and unrest and baked by equatorial sun, the long-troubled Horn of Africa is again in the news. Gripped by widespread drought, the region now finds itself facing the all-too-familiar specter of famine. Millions of people are directly at risk of starvation, and conditions continue to worsen. Even in this drought-prone region the scale of this ongoing crisis is immense, threatening countries that have traditionally fallen outside of the drought belt. Chief among these is Kenya, a once-prosperous country and popular tourist destination known for years as the jewel of East Africa.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | September 18, 1992
London. -- The wheel of fortune is slowly beginning to turn in Somalia. At last food aid is arriving, and the U.N. peace-keeping soldiers from Pakistan are starting to disembark. Once the world's humanitarian machinery is put in gear -- indefensibly belated though it is on this occasion -- it invariably makes a significant impact.We are a long way from the 19th-century attitude of ''let them die.''The confident utilitarian, James Mill, wrote to the great economist, David Ricardo, ''Does not this English weather frighten you?
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1994
The specter of a major famine has reappeared in Africa.Some 20 million people are at risk, mainly in the Horn of Africa and East Africa, according to officials from the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID), the United Nations, and private agencies such as Catholic Relief Services.Concern has been voiced that the international community will be unable to mobilize enough food to meet the growing demand. Pledges from donor countries have not come near the requirement of about 3 million metric tons of relief food.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | October 24, 2011
- As the small plane entered the pattern to land at this town on the eastern edge of Kenya, the view from the window was of miles and miles of scrubby landscape, low trees and bushes almost the same brown color as the sandy earth beneath them. Hardly noticeable were the small buildings and many tents that have put this place on the international map. They were covered with the ubiquitous brown dust that would soon blow in my face as I stepped onto the tarmac. Dadaab has become host to one of the largest refugee populations in the world.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Waves of refugees arrive daily to Kenya, some having walked weeks through unforgiving desert with virtually no possessions, and yet local relief workers report optimism among the millions threatened by the historic famine and drought spreading through the Horn of Africa. "Everyone looks hungry and wiped out," said Bruce White, a Catholic Relief Services adviser who returned earlier this month from Kenya. "But there is a sense of hope because there is help. I asked one man what he wanted here and he said 'peace.'" Jonathan Ernst, a Baltimore freelance photojournalist, reached the refugee camps in eastern Kenya last week and is reporting to Lutheran World Relief.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
The world has been slow to react to the growing specter of famine in Somalia, despite repeated warnings by the United Nations and aid organizations that millions of people are at risk. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has said that nearly 4 million Somalis - half the country's population - were in imminent danger of starvation. Unless the international community takes immediate steps to address the crisis, the loss of life there could rival that of the humanitarian emergencies in Sudan in 1998, Ethiopia in 2001 and Niger in 2005.
NEWS
July 11, 2011
The letter to the editor responding to Dan Rodricks ' column supporting tuition breaks for children of illegal immigrants merits a response. ("Tuition break for illegal immigrants not a principled stand" Readers Respond, July 2.) First, these so-called illegal immigrants are being employed by our fellow Americans. And these Americans don't seem to be bothered by the immorality of offering these hard-working people sub-standard wages. Second, most "legal" Americans (even those out of work)
SPORTS
January 4, 2010
Alex Kovalev broke out of a long slump in a big way. The 36-year-old forward has taken his share of flak in his first season in Ottawa for failing to produce regularly, but on Sunday, Kovalev ended a 10-game scoring drought with a career-high four goals in the Senators' 7-4 victory over the visiting Philadelphia Flyers. "All I can say is that it's a good way to start 2010," said Kovalev, who added an assist. The goals were his first since he snapped a 16-game goal-less run with a hat trick on Dec. 12 against Carolina.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | March 1, 2009
Kat Nicholson, 12, helped fry 22 pounds of bacon and scramble 20 dozen eggs well before dawn yesterday so that a Howard County food shelter could serve breakfast. Hours later, she was making dozens of bag lunches to distribute to the homeless in Baltimore. The smell and the feel of food heightened her hunger, but she didn't so much as take a taste. She had promised to fast for 30 hours. About 250 Howard County teens from more than a dozen different churches participated in the 2009 World Vision 30 Hour Famine, an event that meant forgoing food from midday Friday to 6 p.m. yesterday.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
After a spirited hour of debate that prompted lawmakers to reflect on their ethnic histories, the Maryland Senate gave preliminary approval yesterday to a bill that would require public BTC schools to teach children about the Irish potato famine.The 26-18 vote came after the bill's sponsor, Sen. Perry Sfikas, accused educators of negligence in failing to include any mention of the 1845-1850 mass starvation in school curriculums.The bill, which is opposed by state education officials, is expected to receive final Senate approval and be sent to the House for consideration.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 8, 1992
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- A year ago, 5-year-old Mohammed Abukar lay on his back in a decrepit hospital yard, his right leg newly amputated after a shell blast in the war that killed his family.With only his grandmother to look after him and a famine looming, the prospects of survival were dim for the bright, brown-eyed boy with an engaging smile.Last year, he lay outdoors in the heat, swatting flies with a piece of cardboard. Yesterday, on the anniversary of his operation, a smiling Mohammed loped around with his friends, helped by a steel crutch clamped to his arm.But children Mohammed's age and younger are rare in Somalia today.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Thomas H. Maugh II and Alan Zarembo and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | April 7, 2007
A global warming report issued yesterday by the United Nations paints a near-apocalyptic vision of Earth's future: more than a billion people in need of water, extreme food shortages in Africa, a landscape ravaged by floods and millions of species sentenced to extinction. Despite the harshness of its vision, the report was quickly criticized by scientists who said its findings were watered down at the last minute by government bureaucrats seeking to deflect calls for action. "The science got hijacked by the political bureaucrats at the late stage of the game," said John Walsh, a climate expert at the University of Alaska who helped write a chapter on the polar regions.
TRAVEL
By COLLEEN DUNN BATES and COLLEEN DUNN BATES,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 4, 2006
DUBLIN, IRELAND / / My family went to the far reaches of southern Ireland just so we could say "Skibbereen" as often as possible. OK, that's an exaggeration. That's not the only reason we drove from Dublin to Skibbereen and back again. But go ahead, try it: Say "Skibbereen" out loud. There. Didn't it make you happy just to say it? It wasn't easy, this road trip we undertook with two other families. Now that we are all back in our big American cars and houses, I marvel at how we managed to stuff six adults, four teenagers, three 11-year-olds and a week's worth of gear into two minivans -- not to mention into some of the bed-and-breakfasts we took over.
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