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ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH YURGEALITIS and SARAH YURGEALITIS,SUN REPORTER | January 12, 2006
Imagine living in a family with such peculiar yet colorful members that others have to see them to believe them. This is the basis for Steve Solomon's semi-autobiographical one-man show, My Mother's Italian, My Father's Jewish, and I'm in Therapy. Voicing 32 characters, Solomon takes the audience on a hilarious journey, which includes everything from his everyday interactions to family stories. This all takes place while Solomon sits in the waiting room of a therapist's office. "I take on all these characters -- from family members to the people at the airport, to the cabdrivers, anyone I interact with in my everyday life," Solomon says.
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NEWS
By Warren Buckler | July 23, 1999
WHILE Marylanders fought and killed each other throughout the Civil War, the Battle of Gettysburg stands out in popular memory at least as a particularly harsh reminder of the animosities that made this state to an extraordinary degree "a house divided." Anyone whose roots in Baltimore and Maryland go back into the 19th century has surely become well versed in family lore related to the terrible blood-letting, 136 years ago this month, just up the road in Pennsylvania. In our family, my grandmother, Mary Coleman (Herbert)
FEATURES
By James Endrst and James Endrst,Hartford Courant | April 19, 1995
Here a Turturro, there a Turturro, everywhere, it seems, there's a Turturro.They might not be the Barrymores. Or even the Baldwins.And yet, as one producer puts it, it's as if the Turturro family is "eating up Hollywood."To date, actor-director John Turturro ("Quiz Show" and "Barton Fink") has been the most successful and best-known member of the Turturro troupe. But the TV Turturros are coming up fast.John's brother Nicholas, who plays Det. James Martinez on ABC's "NYPD Blue," has been raising his profile on prime-time's top cop show this year and as one of the stars of the feature film "Federal Hill."
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
The path from Baltimore to the National Basketball Association is dotted with big names and busts, with perennial All-Stars like Carmelo Anthony, heartwarming reclamation projects like Gary Neal and whatever-happened-to former first-round draft picks like Josh Boone. But in the decade since Anthony was drafted behind a legend-in-the-making named LeBron James and the long-forgotten Darko Milicic, an argument can be made that no single family has made a bigger impact in the NBA than the Connelly brothers.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 12, 2006
And so Molly Welsh, an Englishwoman sentenced to indentured servitude in 17th-century Maryland, wed an African slave named Bannaka. And they begat four daughters, one of whom was named Mary. And Mary wed a slave named Robert, who took her last name, which, by the time of their nuptials, had become Bannaky. Mary and Robert begat one son and three daughters. One of the daughters, Jemima, wed Samuel D. Lett. From that union came eight children, including a son named Aquilla. "Aquilla Lett eventually moved to Ohio," Gwen Marable said Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | April 27, 2008
YOU'D THINK THAT THE HIGH POINT OF something called "Great Chef's Dinner" would be the meal. And this year, visiting chef Jim Gerhardt of Limestone Restaurant in Louisville, Ky., was part of the draw. But at this, the 17th annual such fundraiser for the Family Tree, the oohs and aahs began way before the first course was served. They started as soon as the doors to the dining rooms in the Grand Lodge at Hunt Valley opened, and guests to the sold-out event got their first look at the 35 tables inside.
FEATURES
By Steve Silk and Steve Silk,Hartford Courant | December 21, 1994
Guess what crazy Emma O'Hallahan has done now. The Southern California granny with a bad attitude bumped off her cantankerous husband. Filled old Marvin with a load of buckshot, she did. Right in the head. Buried him in the back yard. Now if only the old guy would leave her alone.But no. Marvin stubbornly keeps reappearing from the grave, haunting Emma with his presence and, worse, with his long litany of what ails America and just about everybody in it. It's as if the decomposing creep never died.
FEATURES
By Albert Mobilio and Albert Mobilio,Newsday | June 15, 1994
My wife and I were out with another couple recently, and we were talking about ethnicity. We realized that if our friends had a daughter (half Jewish-half Irish) and we had a son (half Italian-half Jewish) who married, our grandchildren would be a mish-mash of cultures, practically deracinated and stripped of any real heritage.That may be true, I said, thumping my chest, but they would have my name. What that name might be worth, in the face of eroding European ethnic identity, is precisely what Bill Tonelli sets out to discover in his sociological picaresque, "The Amazing Story of the Tonelli Family in America."
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | December 22, 2003
THE SKELETON that rattled in the late South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond's closet when Essie Mae Washington-Williams revealed that she's his daughter also rattled for me. My two granddaughters are her great-granddaughters. That means that they are Mr. Thurmond's great-great-granddaughters. This was not really news to me. At family functions, Mr. Thurmond's relationship with Ms. Washington-Williams was the subject of much gossip and speculation. That's always where it ended, since she would not utter a word one way or another on the subject.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 2, 2000
LIKE MANY families, mine sometimes exaggerates the accomplishments of our ancestors. All of my Irish relatives, for example, claim to be descended from "Celtic ruling clans." None ever seems to hail from a "losing clan." On the German side of the tribe, the name Kasper is an indication, or so I have been told, that we are kin to kings. Another possible translation of "Kasper" is puppeteer. Given the choice between claiming we are descended from monarchs or from street-corner performers, we go the royalty route.
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