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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 11, 2001
Porcini mushroom-scented Dover sole roulade with roasted pepper mousseline on spinach noisette and golden tomato coulis -- and that was just the first course at the Family Tree's Great Chefs' Dinner. That and dishes like Maryland crab salad with Osetra caviar and green peppercorn- crusted veal chop on foie gras risotto were why some 275 people filled the Center Club for the charity's annual gourmet meal, which each year is prepared by a different visiting chef. This year, chef Lynn Kennedy-Tilyou, from Taneytown's Antrim 1844 Country Inn, received rave reviews from the gathering of gourmands.
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NEWS
By Lane Page | May 29, 2014
Among the generations of fine ancestors Dennis Ayers discovered while climbing through the branches of his family tree are a "witch" and an "Indian-slayer. " Then there's the 11th-century tale of the origin of his family name with William the Conqueror's British invasion force, and the coincidental 20th-century return of the family to a farm just four miles from ancestral land across the Patapsco River. And that's just in his father's father's line. With results like this, no wonder genealogy is the fastest growing hobby in the country, says Ayers, who lives in Ellicott City and is president of the Howard County Genealogical Society . Curious baby boomers seem to represent many of the family history seekers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | August 15, 1999
Mission: To build stronger, healthier families and prevent the maltreatment of children. Affiliated with Parents Anonymous, the National Exchange Club and United Way, the Family Tree provides crisis intervention, information and referral and a 24-hour, toll-free statewide Family StressLine. The group's parent education programs focus on teaching parents new skills and strategies in a supportive, informal group setting. Trained volunteers also work with pregnant teen-agers and young fathers in a home-based mentoring program.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
The path from Baltimore to the National Basketball Association is dotted with big names and busts, with perennial All-Stars like Carmelo Anthony, heartwarming reclamation projects like Gary Neal and whatever-happened-to former first-round draft picks like Josh Boone. But in the decade since Anthony was drafted behind a legend-in-the-making named LeBron James and the long-forgotten Darko Milicic, an argument can be made that no single family has made a bigger impact in the NBA than the Connelly brothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 7, 1999
Gourmands gathered at Linwoods/Due restaurants in Owings Mills as the Family Tree held its eighth annual Great Chefs' Dinner. This year, the $200-a-plate meal was masterminded by renowned chef Alessandro Stratta, former executive chef of the four-star Mary Elaine's restaurant at the Phoenician hotel in Scottsdale, Ariz.During the cocktail hour, dinner co-chairs Georgia Stamas and Ziba Franks welcomed eager epicures, including the Family Tree's deputy executive director, Stephanie Davis, and director of development, Judy Hyman; Joanne and Abraham Rosenthal, CEO of Prime Retail Inc.; Dort and Richard Mollett, owners of Antrim 1844 Country Inn; Caprece Jackson Garrett, special-events coordinator for Port Discovery, and Dennis Garrett, president of Arcadia Transportation; and Joan and Tom Smyth, VP of the Albert S. Smyth Co.After cocktails came the serious supping: a five-course meal that began with sea scallops and asparagus with black truffle hollandaise, and ended with chocolate mousse.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | June 23, 1993
Family, huh? As if he didn't have enough problems, Bill Clinton has family like "Jurassic Park" has lizards.Doesn't this guy ever get a break?Let's review. He's got Mom, the woman behind the false eyelashes, who is willing to bet the entire tax hike at the racetrack. And then there's rock-and-rolling Brother Roger, who makes Billy Carter look like Sir Laurence Olivier. In his latest episode, Roger was seen assaulting a heckler at a basketball game. It gets worse. You know the story. Now Bill's got a 55-year-old high-school dropout who's also a Republican showing up on "Good Morning America" claiming to be his half-brother.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | February 16, 1997
IT WAS A HOT JULY afternoon in 1991, the kind of day Noel Coward described in his ditty "Mad Dogs and Englishmen," when I went to hunt for my deceased relatives in Baltimore Cemetery.It was searing at the far eastern end of North Avenue. Hot gusts of air rolled in from Sinclair Lane.Staff members at Baltimore Cemetery were efficient and helpful. They extracted the location of my family's lot from little cards housed in long drawers. They provided a suggested walking route and sent me on my way.I passed the impressive granite and limestone graves of 19th-century German brewers and musicians, but couldn't find my great-grandfather, William Stewart, Area J, Lot 187.I walked back to the big, stone, entrance castle, looked helpless, and got one of the staff to escort me to the resting place of great-grandpop, the father of Lily Rose and Cora, the sisters so often mentioned in this column.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1998
Two respected nonprofit groups that try to prevent child abuse are targeting the problem with new programs and a new name.The two agencies -- Parents Anonymous and the Child Abuse Prevention Center -- joined forces in July. They created the Family Tree, a name that is kinder and simpler to better describe the protective nature of their mission.The goal is to more aggressively serve the 15,000 parents calling each year in need of free child-rearing help.The service focuses on preventing a problem considered acute.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | August 4, 1991
Blanche Doolittle Webb wasn't intimidated by the thought of planninga reunion for 100 of her kinfolk.After all, the family's motto is: "Do a little more a little bit better."The reunion, Aug. 6-8 at a Towson hotel, is expected to draw about 100 Doolittles -- from 26 states and Canada.As president of Doolittle Family Inc., the Harford County resident has planned tours of Baltimore and Fort McHenry, and a family meeting as part of the family's three-day biannual reunion next week in Towson.
NEWS
By ANN LOLORDO | August 22, 1993
Oberlin, La. -- At the juncture of two country lanes, the Sonniers have buried their dead.Here in Allen Parish, amid the lush green fields of rice along State Highway 26, a sign points the way to a slip of pasture, rimmed by fence posts weathered gray. There, beyond rain rusted gates held fast with a wire hook, lie members of a Cajun clan who settled in this spit of central Louisiana more than a century ago.This is America beyond the urban skyline and suburban sprawl, a sweep of country far from interstates and airports where fathers still live within sight of their daughters, and some traditions, like burying kin in a small family graveyard on the edge of a field, live as long as a great pin oak.At the Sonnier Cemetery, whitewashed crosses, unmarked cement vaults and, in recent years, squares of polished marble distinguish married kin from blood relation, husband from wife, father from son. And while the headstones seem unremarkable, Ruby Robichaux mentions their orientation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
When Henry Bromell won the Writers' Guild Award this year for scripting “The Good Soldier” episode of “Homeland,” he thanked Barry Levinson and Tom Fontana. Why, you might wonder, would this California screenwriter be thanking these two producers closely identified with Baltimore and New York, respectively, as he accepted an award for work on a series with which they had absolutely no connection? The answer goes to the heart of what's known in the television industry as “The Family Tree,” a group of a couple of dozen writers and producers who can trace their screenwriting roots or training back to a pair of seminal TV shows from the early 1980s, “St.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Maryland First Lady Catherine Curran O'Malley announced Monday that Baltimore City, Talbot and Worcester counties have been selected for a new statewide initiative to prevent child sexual abuse by training adults. The Family Tree, a Baltimore non-profit, was granted $25,000 in private funding to replicate the Enough Abuse Campaign, which originated in Massachusetts. The Family Tree will provide free training to child advocacy organizations in the three communities. The program emphasizes educating adults to recognize abused children, to communicate with children about appropriate interactions with adults, and to advocate for victims.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2011
When she was a child growing up in Lothian, Lyndra Pratt loved spending time with her grandmother, Margaret Ann Easton, at Easton's nearby farm. Naturally, Pratt was curious about this woman she loved so dearly. What, she wondered, had her grandma's life been like? How had she become the way she was? "Who are your parents?" Pratt asked one day when she was 8. "Where did they come from?" Easton burst into tears. That was 48 years ago, long before Pratt, now Lyndra Pratt Marshall, realized black Americans of her grandmother's time rarely wanted to discuss their lineage.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Patrick Reid O'Brien knew at the age of 6 that he wanted to be an artist — art flows through his family tree — but everybody warned him he'd never be able to pay his bills with his art. And for a long time, everybody was right. After graduating with an art degree from St. Mary's College, O'Brien designed insurance forms and then sold hoses and couplings for a while to support his family. He got close to making a living at his art when he was doing graphics for a marketing company.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to the Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
"It was late in the spring of 1923 and the very popular Anne Arundel County strawberries were running very late. It seemed like the rain would never stop and the sand was being splashed up onto the waiting berries. "Finally, the sun — greeted with mixed emotions — came out in all its glory and beat down on the Maryland hillside. Mixed emotions because now, acres and acres of strawberries would ripen suddenly, needing to be picked, packed, and shipped to Baltimore quickly or the entire spring cash crop would be lost … perhaps a call to a Baltimore agent would yield some help.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
Soon-to-be princess Kate Middleton has a few prominent Marylanders — and American celebrities — in her family tree. Middleton, a commoner who marries Prince William on Friday, is a distant cousin of "The Star-Spangled Banner" author Francis Scott Key, talk-show host Ellen DeGeneres and Colonial Maryland governor Sir Thomas Bladen, the namesake of Bladensburg, according to "The Ancestry of Catherine Middleton. " Released this month by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the book traces Middleton's roots back hundreds of years, and ties the 29-year-old to a host of historical figures, from George Washington to World War II Gen. George S. Patton.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 8, 1999
Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, and Martha Stewart, the Queen of Cold, together in the kitchen.Franklin takes the word right out of my mouth when she tells Stewart that being there with her is "unbelievable."But it wouldn't be a Martha Stewart holiday special, now would it, without one or more unbelievable moments. "Martha Stewart's Home for the Holidays -- The Family Tree," which airs tonight on CBS, has enough bizarre moments to still please dyed-in-the-wool Stewart haters. But, in fairness, there's also quite a bit to like about the program, as holiday specials go.I offer that qualified praise with full knowledge that some will claim that I, along with most of the media, have caved in to the almighty power of Martha Stewart Living OmnimediaInc.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2006
For most of his life, William Popomaronis wondered about his blue eyes and blond hair. Born in Baltimore to natives of Greece, Popomaronis stood out in a sea of dark hair, dark eyes and olive skin at family gatherings. It was obvious that the 52-year-old pharmacist and one of his daughters picked up their coloring from his mother and maternal grandfather, who were also blondes, but no one else in the family had similar features. "I could only infer that somewhere, long ago in my family history, someone did not originate from Greece," Popomaronis says.
NEWS
March 6, 2010
As Maryland's leading child-abuse prevention organization, we at The Family Tree know that Senate Bill 689 will help protect Maryland's children from maltreatment. By providing clear guidance about how a parent may discipline his or her child, the bill both teaches parents appropriate behavior and protects children from dangerous abuse. The Family Tree wholeheartedly endorses Senate Bill 689 and applauds its co-sponsors, Sens. Jamie Raskin and Richard Madaleno. Child abuse takes a tremendous toll in the United States.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2008
Pam Engel tried something new with her biology students last year at Glen Burnie High School. Instead of talking about how diseases and traits are passed on through family members, she teamed up with a doctor to help students create their own family trees. Students had to list three generations and include medical conditions such as diabetes and heart disease, along with causes of death. Then they had to act as genetics counselors and predict which conditions might be passed on in their families.
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