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NEWS
July 16, 2007
Astudy showing that keeping children at home, even if there are problems, is better than putting them in foster care reinforces the importance of family ties and the need to view foster care as the exception, not the norm, when dealing with troubled families. That's a lesson that Maryland is now trying to apply - and wisely so - after too many years of bad practices. The recently released study, by a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sloan School of Management, examined 15,000 cases in Illinois from 1990 to 2002, one of the largest studies of the effects of foster care.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Date: June 7 Her story: Anna Scanlan, 26, grew up in Timonium. She is a labor and delivery nurse at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center in Rosedale and is working toward a master's degree in nursing education at Towson University. Her mother, Mary Scanlan, lives in Timonium. Her father, Al Scanlan, lives in Silver Spring. His story: Dave Swift, 32, grew up in Stoneleigh. He works with his two brothers for their uncle's custom home company, Southfen Inc., based in Whitehall.
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EXPLORE
December 27, 2011
An article in the Dec. 28, 1961 edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian reported an area resident's holiday was made even brighter after a chance phone call led to a reunion with two sisters he had not seen in 16 years. Christmas was made happier for a Lansdowne resident, semi-orphan John Glade , 21, who now resides at the home of Mrs. Betty Volkman of 3201 Hilltop road. John's mother died when he was three years old, leaving him and two older sisters.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, For The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Life for Casey Baynes is all about family. Her love of family is why she created the Casey Cares Foundation, and that same strong belief in family ties is reflected in nearly all of her favorite things. Baynes was working with a charity that granted wishes for critically ill children when she says she discovered that what families really wanted wasn't just one big wish to come true. "What about a movie and pizza night at home because [a child's] immune system was too depleted to go to a movie theater?
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | June 4, 1998
Mo Vaughn's father grew up in Baltimore and once tried out for the Colts. His grandmother still resides in Pimlico, and his Baltimore relatives also include an uncle and several cousins.Interesting.Vaughn's parents, Leroy and Shirley, live south of Richmond, in Midlothian, Va. They fly to almost all of Mo's games in Boston. They could drive to Camden Yards in less than three hours.Even more interesting -- especially to Vaughn.Calling Baltimore "definitely one of my top spots," the potential free agent spoke yesterday of playing closer to his family and said he could be flexible in his contract negotiations if the Orioles maintained their reluctance to pay a position player more than Cal Ripken.
FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
In a recent interview with The Baltimore Sun, Molly Shattuck revealed that she and husband Mayo A. Shattuck III have separated. The former Ravens cheerleader, who is busy promoting her new book, "Vibrant Living," with a national tour, said the split is amicable. "We are separated. Mayo has a home 2.4 miles away. We still love each other and spend time together as a family," she said. Mayo Shattuck, the former CEO of Constellation Energy, was not immediately available to comment.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | February 2, 2007
If grating is what you are looking for, then by all means, don't miss Because I Said So. Watching this movie, with Diane Keaton cast as the ne plus ultra of irritating, overbearing mothers, is roughly the equivalent of listening to fingernails on a chalkboard for nearly two hours. With her skittishness and her near-constant state of fluster, Keaton as a comic actress can be wonderfully endearing, the sort of lovable ditz you can laugh with and desperately want to protect. But here, as a mother who can't bear the thought of her lovelorn daughter (Mandy Moore)
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend will flex the muscle of her maiden name tonight at a fund-raiser in Washington. Host of the event is her uncle, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts, one of the most prominent members of Congress. The price of admission is $1,000 per person, with an expected take of about $100,000. The news media are not invited. It is among the first overt displays of Townsend's family ties in the three weeks since the eldest daughter of Robert F. Kennedy formally announced her bid for governor of Maryland.
SPORTS
May 12, 2007
Good morning--Dale Earnhardt Jr.--You will be richly rewarded for cutting the family ties.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | March 19, 2002
STANFORD, Calif. - Did anyone ever call Franklin D. Roosevelt a "Dutch American" or Dwight Eisenhower a "German American"? It would have been resented, not only by them and their supporters, but by Americans in general. These men were Americans - not hyphenated Americans or half Americans. Most black families in the United States today have been here longer than most white families. No one except the American Indians can claim to have been on American soil longer. Why then call blacks in the United States "African-Americans" when not even their great-great-great-grandparents ever laid eyes on Africa?
FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
In a recent interview with The Baltimore Sun, Molly Shattuck revealed that she and husband Mayo A. Shattuck III have separated. The former Ravens cheerleader, who is busy promoting her new book, "Vibrant Living," with a national tour, said the split is amicable. "We are separated. Mayo has a home 2.4 miles away. We still love each other and spend time together as a family," she said. Mayo Shattuck, the former CEO of Constellation Energy, was not immediately available to comment.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
The more money a family in Maryland earns, the more likely their child is to have higher-than-average SAT scores, according to data released by the College Board on Thursday. On average, students living in poverty scored hundreds of points below wealthy students on the national tests used in college admissions, giving them an advantage during the process. "The SAT tells you quite a bit about where you come from, but not very much about where a kid can go," said Robert Schaeffer, public education director of FairTest, a nonprofit that believes the SAT should be optional in the college admissions process.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 1, 2012
For the first time in more than a month, the players will have a rare weekend off as coach John Harbaugh sent them home to take care of their families and tie up loose ends before the start of the regular season. And with the Ravens slated to open the season on Monday, Sept. 10 and many of the starters kept out of Thursday night's preseason finale against the St. Louis Rams, the players will enjoy a rare extended chance to rest and relax. Harbaugh said the time off should be a significant benefit for the players.
SPORTS
By Eric Garland and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
Kevin Marshall and Buddy Evans, like many cousins, are close. They keep in touch regularly and enjoy talking over a cup of coffee when they can get together. The two, who have spent much of their lives on the Chesapeake Bay as watermen, even took their cordial relationship to land to play in a softball league together. But when the 41st annual Crisfield Boat Docking Classic takes place Sept. 2, none of that will matter. Asked whether they were on the same team, Evans laughed at the thought.
EXPLORE
December 27, 2011
An article in the Dec. 28, 1961 edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian reported an area resident's holiday was made even brighter after a chance phone call led to a reunion with two sisters he had not seen in 16 years. Christmas was made happier for a Lansdowne resident, semi-orphan John Glade , 21, who now resides at the home of Mrs. Betty Volkman of 3201 Hilltop road. John's mother died when he was three years old, leaving him and two older sisters.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
It's only natural that J. Scott Wilfong, president and CEO of SunTrust Bank for the Greater Washington/Maryland area, would want to give back to the American Heart Association. After all, heart disease runs in his family. His wife, Susan, suffers from dilated cardiomyopathy, a condition in which the heart weakens and becomes enlarged. Her brother died at the age of 13 and her father at the age of 61 from the same condition. Their daughter, Sarah, 29, has a defibrillator and his sister-in-law has had a heart transplant.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 20, 1990
AMERICAN DREAMER" wears its ancestry, as well as its thematic statements, on its sleeve.This new NBC show, which gets a send-off tonight at 9:30 on Channel 2 (WMAR) before moving into its regular Saturday night at 10:30 slot this weekend, is from producer Gary David Goldberg.Subtlety was never the strength of Goldberg's one big hit,"Family Ties," Michael J. Fox was. Goldberg's characters tend to strut around like ideas in an article out of "Psychology Today" until the actors are given time to flesh them out, and even then the episodes of his shows let you know what they are about by virtually running a banner headline in the opening dialogue."
FEATURES
September 3, 2007
Brad Pitt and his partner, Angelina Jolie, are ready for another child, the actor said yesterday as he was promoting his new film. He did not indicate whether they planned another biological child or if they would adopt. Pitt and Jolie, with children in tow, were in Venice, Italy, to talk about his film on Western outlaw Jesse James, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Asked by Italian state TV whether they were ready for a fifth, Pitt replied: "Yeah we're ready."
EXPLORE
July 12, 2011
Just off busy Butler Road, in Glyndon, a road narrows and passes through two stone gates into a quieter time — a time when neighbors knew each other and enjoyed each other's company on their front porches. It was a time when friends routinely shared picnics and hymn sings on weekday evenings, and worship services and fried chicken dinners on Sundays. That's still the gentle way life flows during the warmer months at Emory Grove — a place that, as one visitor observed, "forces you to slow down and enjoy nature, and become part of a community.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
Soon-to-be princess Kate Middleton has a few prominent Marylanders — and American celebrities — in her family tree. Middleton, a commoner who marries Prince William on Friday, is a distant cousin of "The Star-Spangled Banner" author Francis Scott Key, talk-show host Ellen DeGeneres and Colonial Maryland governor Sir Thomas Bladen, the namesake of Bladensburg, according to "The Ancestry of Catherine Middleton. " Released this month by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the book traces Middleton's roots back hundreds of years, and ties the 29-year-old to a host of historical figures, from George Washington to World War II Gen. George S. Patton.
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