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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2003
Dr. Hans Joachim Koetter, a physician who specialized in family medicine, died of complications from a stroke Monday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 77. Dr. Koetter was born in Frankfurt, Germany, and was raised in Dresden. During World War II, he was conscripted into the German army and served as an infantryman on the Eastern front, where he was wounded. After the war, he attended the University of Frankfurt Medical School, where he earned his medical degree in 1951. He completed internships at the 97th U.S. Army Hospital and University Hospital, both in Frankfurt.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Dr. Thomas F. "Tim" Herbert, a well-known Howard County physician who practiced family medicine in Ellicott City for 40 years, died Sunday of cancer at William Hill Manor in Easton. He was 86. "Tim was such a wonderful guy and he was wonderful to me," said Dr. Harry C. Knipp, a radiologist and longtime friend. "He lived and practiced medicine in the home he grew up in that overlooked Ellicott City. " The son of Dr. Alpha Nathan Herbert, a physician, and Dorothy Kraft Herbert, a registered nurse, Thomas Franklyn Herbert, who was known as "Tim," was born in Baltimore and raised in Ellicott City.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
Dr. Michael Victor Edelstein, whose career at Sheppard Pratt Health System spanned nearly 30 years and whose hobbies were auto repair and listening to gospel music, died of a heart attack Monday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 66. Dr. Edelstein was on his way to work Monday morning when he was stricken. He was taken by medics to St. Joseph Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. "I've know Michael since I came to Sheppard Pratt in 1986, and he was one of the most remarkable doctors I've ever worked with," said Dr. Steve Sharfstein, Sheppard Pratt Health System president.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
Dr. Michael Victor Edelstein, whose career at Sheppard Pratt Health System spanned nearly 30 years and whose hobbies were auto repair and listening to gospel music, died of a heart attack Monday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 66. Dr. Edelstein was on his way to work Monday morning when he was stricken. He was taken by medics to St. Joseph Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. "I've know Michael since I came to Sheppard Pratt in 1986, and he was one of the most remarkable doctors I've ever worked with," said Dr. Steve Sharfstein, Sheppard Pratt Health System president.
NEWS
April 12, 1996
Dr. Edward Joseph Kowalewski, a physician who was chairman of the family medicine program and department at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died of heart failure Tuesday at Anne Arundel County Medical Center. He was 75 and lived in Arnold.Dr. Kowalewski became convinced of the values of family medicine -- providing comprehensive medical services for an individual practically from cradle to grave -- while practicing medicine in Pennsylvania after World War II.In a family practice, emphasis is placed on treatment of all problems, from sniffles to management of long-term conditions, such as terminal cancer.
NEWS
September 8, 2008
* The Greater Baltimore Medical Center has named Dr. Robin Motter-Mast, a Cock-eysville physician, chairwoman of the Department of Family Medicine. Motter-Mast, who is certified in family medicine and caring for patients of all ages, joined GBMC in 2005 and works at the Hunt Valley practice of Dr. Mark Lamos and Associates. A physician practicing for 10 years, Motter-Mast graduated from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and completed an osteopathic internship at Delaware County Memorial Hospital/Crozer Chester Medical Center and a residency in family medicine at the University of Maryland Medical System.
NEWS
By Pooja Aggarwal | July 19, 2009
Like many medical students, I proudly wear Obama T-shirts and yearn to reform medicine. While watching the president speak, I envision myself working in primary care, on the vanguard of health care reform. Then, a little later, reality hits. With the number of senior citizens rapidly growing, by 2020 we will likely lack 200,000 physicians. So why do only 2 percent of medical students choose family medicine? Medical students undervalue family medicine residencies in comparison to programs such as dermatology.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1996
Hot jobs: Want to go into a field where you're just about guaranteed a job? Try computer animation, says POV magazine, which lists "10 Career Fields To Get Into -- And 10 Career Fields To Dump" in its May issue. Others include on-line content producing, mutual fund managing, industrial environmental work, family medicine, management consulting, intellectual property law, the clergy, interactive advertising and physical therapy. Jobs to avoid: accountant, bank teller, bureaucrat, telephone operator, factory worker, real estate agent, bartender, college teacher, librarian and middle manager.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Dr. Omar A. Khan of Havre de Grace recently was honored by the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation for his commitment to education in family medicine. He was selected to receive the 2007 Pfizer Teacher Development Award based on his scholastic achievement, leadership qualities and dedication to family medicine. The award, supported by the Pfizer Medical Humanities Initiatives, recognizes community-based physicians who teach family medicine on a part-time basis. Khan teaches at the Department of Family and Community Medicine, Christiana Care Health System, Delaware.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | October 19, 2010
The Maryland Board of Physicians has released the list of doctors and other medical professionals who were sanctioned in September. Here is a summary of the actions; for more information, see The Baltimore Sun's Consuming Interests blog . The list: Romeo A. Ferrer, M.D., OB/GYN, Severna Park. Summary suspension. Improperly administered anesthesia. Thomas L. Fieldson, M.D., General practice, Waldorf. Summary suspension of June 10, 2010, is vacated, probation for 5 years subject to terms and conditions; and restriction from practicing pain management medicine and dispensing any opiates or benzodiazepine medications for any longer than 3 days and only in an emergency situation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 22, 2011
Dr. Harry L. Knipp, whose family had been associated with family medicine in West Baltimore and Catonsville for 110 years and who treated generations of families, died Friday of an intestinal disease at his home in Hedgesville, W.Va. The former longtime Ten Hills resident was 87. Dr. Knipp was born at his grandfather's house, at Fremont Avenue and Lanvale Street, where his father George A. Knipp and grandfather Harry E. Knipp practiced medicine together. The Knipps have been practicing medicine — 11 family members have been physicians —since pre-Revolutionary War days.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | October 19, 2010
The Maryland Board of Physicians has released the list of doctors and other medical professionals who were sanctioned in September. Here is a summary of the actions; for more information, see The Baltimore Sun's Consuming Interests blog . The list: Romeo A. Ferrer, M.D., OB/GYN, Severna Park. Summary suspension. Improperly administered anesthesia. Thomas L. Fieldson, M.D., General practice, Waldorf. Summary suspension of June 10, 2010, is vacated, probation for 5 years subject to terms and conditions; and restriction from practicing pain management medicine and dispensing any opiates or benzodiazepine medications for any longer than 3 days and only in an emergency situation.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | September 29, 2009
Ryan Circh's heart is drawn to family medicine, but his head - fixated on his daunting student loans and the uncertainties of health care reform - is leading him toward emergency or sports medicine. The 24-year-old studying medicine at the University of Maryland is probably another potential primary care physician lost. In the school's most recent graduating medical school class, more than a third pursued internal and family medicine. That reflects a nationwide trend, according to the National Resident Matching Program, whose figures show about a third of graduating students are going into primary care, a number that's been dropping fairly steadily over the last generation.
NEWS
By Pooja Aggarwal | July 19, 2009
Like many medical students, I proudly wear Obama T-shirts and yearn to reform medicine. While watching the president speak, I envision myself working in primary care, on the vanguard of health care reform. Then, a little later, reality hits. With the number of senior citizens rapidly growing, by 2020 we will likely lack 200,000 physicians. So why do only 2 percent of medical students choose family medicine? Medical students undervalue family medicine residencies in comparison to programs such as dermatology.
NEWS
September 8, 2008
* The Greater Baltimore Medical Center has named Dr. Robin Motter-Mast, a Cock-eysville physician, chairwoman of the Department of Family Medicine. Motter-Mast, who is certified in family medicine and caring for patients of all ages, joined GBMC in 2005 and works at the Hunt Valley practice of Dr. Mark Lamos and Associates. A physician practicing for 10 years, Motter-Mast graduated from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and completed an osteopathic internship at Delaware County Memorial Hospital/Crozer Chester Medical Center and a residency in family medicine at the University of Maryland Medical System.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Dr. Omar A. Khan of Havre de Grace recently was honored by the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation for his commitment to education in family medicine. He was selected to receive the 2007 Pfizer Teacher Development Award based on his scholastic achievement, leadership qualities and dedication to family medicine. The award, supported by the Pfizer Medical Humanities Initiatives, recognizes community-based physicians who teach family medicine on a part-time basis. Khan teaches at the Department of Family and Community Medicine, Christiana Care Health System, Delaware.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Dr. Thomas F. "Tim" Herbert, a well-known Howard County physician who practiced family medicine in Ellicott City for 40 years, died Sunday of cancer at William Hill Manor in Easton. He was 86. "Tim was such a wonderful guy and he was wonderful to me," said Dr. Harry C. Knipp, a radiologist and longtime friend. "He lived and practiced medicine in the home he grew up in that overlooked Ellicott City. " The son of Dr. Alpha Nathan Herbert, a physician, and Dorothy Kraft Herbert, a registered nurse, Thomas Franklyn Herbert, who was known as "Tim," was born in Baltimore and raised in Ellicott City.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | May 9, 1995
Brandon stares ahead, listless, his eyes tinged with pink. His family doctor has found swollen glands and, peeking inside the 2-year-old's ears, claims to see Simba.No response."You're too sick to care, aren't you, sweetie?" Dr. Alex Rocha asks the sad towhead. He turns to Brandon's mother, Dawn Goodman: "He's got tonsillitis," the doctor says.A few minutes later, Dr. Rocha is talking to an 80-year-old farmer about the arthritis in his leg and stops to examine his sandpaper hands."Look at these mitts," he tells Howard Leister, who recently painted 12,000 feet of white fence.
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