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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 24, 1995
MOSCOW -- Natalya Baranskaya created a sensation in 1969 when she published a short novel about the modern Soviet woman, vividly describing a life consumed by enormous drudgery and impossible demands.A quarter-century later, she remains a tart observer of the nation's social progress."Of course, life has changed for women," Mrs. Baranskaya says. "It's gotten much worse."Mrs. Baranskaya, 86, lives in a small apartment on the eighth floor of a tired-looking building in an industrial section of Moscow.
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By Mike Giuliano | November 29, 2011
Many bottles of pinot noir have been sold in the seven years since director Alexander Payne's "Sideways" took moviegoers through California's wine country. His long-overdue new movie, "The Descendants," was worth the wait. Maintaining a delicate balance between its comic and dramatic elements, "The Descendants" is one of the year's most emotionally satisfying movies. Although some of its later scenes seem forced and its overall tone flirts with being facile, these are relatively minor reservations.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 1, 2014
Oh, my Lord, where to begin? You already know what this column is about. You know even though we are barely three sentences in. You knew before you saw the headline. There are days in the opinion business when one story makes itself inevitable and unavoidable, one story sucks up all the air in the room. This is one of those times. One story. Well ... two, actually: the misadventures of Cliven Bundy and Donald Sterling. Mr. Bundy, of course, is the Nevada rancher whose refusal to pay fees to allow his cattle to graze on public land made him a cause celebre on the political right.
NEWS
By Joe Jones | April 21, 2013
From Bangor to Peoria, in the Huffington Post and in Forbes Magazine, the press is focusing on the minimum wage. While we hear and read about it constantly these days, many of us never take the time to reflect on what it really means. When seen up close, as I do every day here in Baltimore at the Center for Urban Families, the real meaning of "minimum" becomes painfully apparent. Minimum is just that. As Merriam Webster says: "the least quantity assignable, admissible, or possible.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
When James H. McDonald was 16, back when Baltimore was legally segregated, he set out to apply for a job in a drugstore a few blocks into the white side of town. Almost as soon as he'd set foot over Fulton Avenue, the dividing line, he had company. "This gentleman - he said he was a policeman - asked what I was doing there," said McDonald, now 80. McDonald, who was followed to the store to prove that there was indeed a job opening, offered the story Monday as an example of life before the civil-rights activists made inroads, before the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech and long before a black man was elected president.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service 7/8 7/8 HC 4B | March 25, 1992
Television has no problem these days casting a friendly snicker at the depictions of family life in old series such as "Ozzie and Harriet" or "Leave It to Beaver." The traditional nuclear family in America has long been an endangered species. Adults have been known to recall growing up neurotic because life at home did not measure up to the warm togetherness shown on "Father Knows Best." Upbeat programming has its downside.The patronizing air toward old series, however, carries an implicit message: Television today is so much more gritty and attuned to reality.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The conventional model of American family life -- a married couple with kids and a stable home -- is on the verge of becoming the exception rather than the rule, the Census Bureau reports.In a study certain to fuel the "family values" debate, Census Bureau statisticians said yesterday that only 50.8 percent of American children live in a traditional "nuclear" family. They define a nuclear family as one where both biological parents are present and all children were born after the marriage.
NEWS
By Daniel Mendel | August 11, 1993
THE STARTLING discovery that affiliation with the Republican Party is genetically determined, announced by scientists in the current issue of the journal Nurture, threatens to overshadow the announcement by government scientists that there might be a gene for homosexuality in men.Reports of the gene that codes for political conservatism, discovered after a long study of quintuplets in Orange County, Calif., have sent shock waves through the medical, political and golfing communities.Psychologists and psychoanalysts have long believed that Republicans' unnatural and frequently unconstitutional tendencies result from unhealthy family life -- a remarkably high percentage of Republicans had authoritarian, domineering fathers and emotionally distant mothers who didn't teach them how to be kind and gentle.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
Don't drop practical arts requirementThe Maryland Board of Education is proposing changes in the graduation requirements for students which will eliminate the practical arts requirement. Home economics courses dealing with family issues such as parenthood responsibilities, resource management and budgeting, establishing and maintaining healthy family relationships, and establishing nutritious eating habits have been among the choices students have had to fulfill the practical arts requirement.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | April 5, 1992
The date is burned into his memory. How could it not be? It was Aug. 12, and John Oates had a lunch date with the woman of his dreams.Gloria Oates has been that woman for 24 years, but on the afternoon of their wedding anniversary, her husband was somewhere else. He was sitting on the other side of the table, but he was definitely somewhere else."That was the day it hit rock bottom," Oates recalls. "I was going to set aside one whole hour to be just with her, and, a half-hour into it, I was thinking about that night's lineup."
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