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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | April 19, 1993
For decades it was Baltimore's Eastern District police station, a proud symbol of law and order amid of one of the city's poorest communities.Now it will be the symbol of a different kind of law and order, but still a haven for those who need help starting out in life.The Family Place is the name of a $1.4 million family support center that will open this fall inside the former police station at 1809 Ashland Ave. -- an 1885 structure that has stood vacant for the past decade.The General Assembly appropriated $500,000 to ensure that construction begins this spring.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
It's one thing for a company to say it's "family-friendly." It's quite another when a working parent can leave the office at 4:30 p.m. each day to pick up the kids from day care and not worry about career damage.As the American work force becomes more diverse, an increasing number of chief executives are becoming aware that workplace flexibility is essential to recruit and retain talented employees, human resources experts say.About two-thirds of major U.S. corporations have established policies aimed at helping employees balance the demands of work and family life, according to a survey by the non-profit Families and Work Institute in New York.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
Maybe the kids seem too loud, too playful, too unrelenting. Maybe a spouse has grown accustomed to doing things alone and isn't ready to let go of a newfound independence. Or maybe routine noises such as slamming doors or clanging silverware trigger flashbacks or uncontrollable twitchiness. Combat has many dangers, but returning home can also be fraught with peril for troops. Using private funding, Anne Arundel Community College next week will begin "Reunited: Family Life After Deployment," a free, four-week seminar aimed at helping military families readjust to life at home.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 26, 1992
Boston. -- My aunt and I are making stuffing and convening with our ancestors. It's a ritual we have performed each year since I inherited Thanksgiving from her. Or to be precise, since the family dinner moved one doorway and one generation down the street.In truth, my aunt, who is eight inches shorter and 21 years older, still regards me as something of an apprentice in the Thanksgiving business, not entirely ready to strike out on my own. A bit too inexperienced to be entrusted with the awesome responsibilities of tradition.
FEATURES
By Judith H. Dobrzynski and Judith H. Dobrzynski,New York Times News Service | July 5, 1995
For all its allure, the American Dream has always come with strings attached. The catch is that hard work and long hours on the job are part and parcel of getting ahead and making money. Family life often pays the price, of course -- a bargain that makes many Americans queasy.Bob Israel, co-owner of a motion-picture ad agency in Los Angeles, knows the feeling well."At some point during the day, I look at my watch, and I'm faced with, 'Do I go home now and spend a little more time with my kids before they go to bed, or do I complete the work that I'm staring at?
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | February 16, 1997
25 years ago The Taneytown Council, faced with its own reservations and petition-bearing residents, turned down the proposed shopping center for Taneytown at its February meeting and drew a caution from developer Robert Bankert to carefully weigh "precedent-settling" decisions. -- The Carroll Record, Feb. 10, 1972.50 years ago Westminster and the surrounding community was very much interested in the Junior Town Meeting, broadcast over station WBAL on Tuesday afternoon. In summing up the half-hour discussion, Mr. Eaton said that he felt the main point had been brought out by Thomas Holmes Jr., when he said, "These things we have said put forth a challenge, a challenge to us, the teen-agers of today, who will in the near future have families of our own and also should strive to rebuild and protect our American family life."
NEWS
April 16, 1993
Every generation is a reflection of the times and circumstances that shaped it. As the largest demographic bulge since the Baby Boomers works its way toward the teen years, its effects on contemporary American life are being felt. Drug use is up among younger teens, and from many schools come reports of young people who are more violent and less respectful of authority, less tuned in to adults and more hip to survival strategies for mean streets or empty houses where they spend many hours alone.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Regarding Susan Reimer 's recent column on elder care, while your parents may have many "talks" with you over the years none rival when the tables turn and you need to facilitate a complex conversation with your parents about elder care ( "How much are they worth to you?" Oct. 9). Even when you start the conversation, it's hard to foresee what sacrifices you and your family might have to make in caring for an aging parent over the long term. Still, those who are thinking ahead about elder care have avoided a big mistake, which is not to think about it at all. While it's smart to initiate these conversations early and often, family dynamics can be complicated and factor into the planning process.
NEWS
September 7, 1994
Was Dan Quayle right after all? Last week the Census Bureau reported that the conventional model of American family life -- a married couple with kids and a stable home -- is on the verge of becoming the exception rather than the rule. The latest figures are bound to renew the "family values" debate highlighted by former Vice President Quayle during the 1992 presidential campaign.The bureau found that in 1991, only 50.8 percent of American children lived in a traditional "nuclear" family -- defined as one where both biological parents are present and all children were born after the marriage.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 28, 1998
THE NATIONAL Partnership for Women & Families says television presents a distorted picture of the American family, in which work and family responsibilities almost never collide, child-care hassles are rare and resolved without a hitch, and ill and aging parents don't exist.Good thing. Or those of us with work/family conflicts, child-care hassles and ill and aging parents would watch even less of it than we do now.I don't know about the rest of you work/family-conflicted women, but there's an overstuffed chair positioned right in front of the television in my house, and that isn't an impression of my rear end in the cushions.
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