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By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 26, 1992
Boston. -- My aunt and I are making stuffing and convening with our ancestors. It's a ritual we have performed each year since I inherited Thanksgiving from her. Or to be precise, since the family dinner moved one doorway and one generation down the street.In truth, my aunt, who is eight inches shorter and 21 years older, still regards me as something of an apprentice in the Thanksgiving business, not entirely ready to strike out on my own. A bit too inexperienced to be entrusted with the awesome responsibilities of tradition.
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FEATURES
By Judith H. Dobrzynski and Judith H. Dobrzynski,New York Times News Service | July 5, 1995
For all its allure, the American Dream has always come with strings attached. The catch is that hard work and long hours on the job are part and parcel of getting ahead and making money. Family life often pays the price, of course -- a bargain that makes many Americans queasy.Bob Israel, co-owner of a motion-picture ad agency in Los Angeles, knows the feeling well."At some point during the day, I look at my watch, and I'm faced with, 'Do I go home now and spend a little more time with my kids before they go to bed, or do I complete the work that I'm staring at?
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | February 16, 1997
25 years ago The Taneytown Council, faced with its own reservations and petition-bearing residents, turned down the proposed shopping center for Taneytown at its February meeting and drew a caution from developer Robert Bankert to carefully weigh "precedent-settling" decisions. -- The Carroll Record, Feb. 10, 1972.50 years ago Westminster and the surrounding community was very much interested in the Junior Town Meeting, broadcast over station WBAL on Tuesday afternoon. In summing up the half-hour discussion, Mr. Eaton said that he felt the main point had been brought out by Thomas Holmes Jr., when he said, "These things we have said put forth a challenge, a challenge to us, the teen-agers of today, who will in the near future have families of our own and also should strive to rebuild and protect our American family life."
NEWS
April 16, 1993
Every generation is a reflection of the times and circumstances that shaped it. As the largest demographic bulge since the Baby Boomers works its way toward the teen years, its effects on contemporary American life are being felt. Drug use is up among younger teens, and from many schools come reports of young people who are more violent and less respectful of authority, less tuned in to adults and more hip to survival strategies for mean streets or empty houses where they spend many hours alone.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Regarding Susan Reimer 's recent column on elder care, while your parents may have many "talks" with you over the years none rival when the tables turn and you need to facilitate a complex conversation with your parents about elder care ( "How much are they worth to you?" Oct. 9). Even when you start the conversation, it's hard to foresee what sacrifices you and your family might have to make in caring for an aging parent over the long term. Still, those who are thinking ahead about elder care have avoided a big mistake, which is not to think about it at all. While it's smart to initiate these conversations early and often, family dynamics can be complicated and factor into the planning process.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 28, 1998
THE NATIONAL Partnership for Women & Families says television presents a distorted picture of the American family, in which work and family responsibilities almost never collide, child-care hassles are rare and resolved without a hitch, and ill and aging parents don't exist.Good thing. Or those of us with work/family conflicts, child-care hassles and ill and aging parents would watch even less of it than we do now.I don't know about the rest of you work/family-conflicted women, but there's an overstuffed chair positioned right in front of the television in my house, and that isn't an impression of my rear end in the cushions.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 11, 1997
BOSTON -- So this is Morning in America, circa 1997: Mom is making breakfast and hurrying 15-year-old Joanna through the before-school ritual: ''Honey, don't forget to brush your teeth and take your drug test.''Dad jumps up at dawn Saturday to run a pop urine quiz on 17-year-old Johnny for any substance leftovers from last night's party. He accompanies his son into the, uh, collection room with a small plastic vial.These warmhearted little scenes of modern family life may soon become domestic docudramas.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 18, 1997
I HAVE NEVER met him, yet like many American dads who watched his television show, I feel I know him intimately. And so when I read the news yesterday that Bill Cosby had lost his only son, Ennis, 27, shot on a California highway, it hurt.I got that same, kicked-in-the-stomach feeling, that sweeps over me when I read about the sudden, senseless deaths of other sons whose dads I know. Cosby's description of his son, "He was my hero," rings true to many fathers.At one level, this personal response to the Cosby tragedy is an overreaction.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 1, 2014
Oh, my Lord, where to begin? You already know what this column is about. You know even though we are barely three sentences in. You knew before you saw the headline. There are days in the opinion business when one story makes itself inevitable and unavoidable, one story sucks up all the air in the room. This is one of those times. One story. Well ... two, actually: the misadventures of Cliven Bundy and Donald Sterling. Mr. Bundy, of course, is the Nevada rancher whose refusal to pay fees to allow his cattle to graze on public land made him a cause celebre on the political right.
NEWS
By Joe Jones | April 21, 2013
From Bangor to Peoria, in the Huffington Post and in Forbes Magazine, the press is focusing on the minimum wage. While we hear and read about it constantly these days, many of us never take the time to reflect on what it really means. When seen up close, as I do every day here in Baltimore at the Center for Urban Families, the real meaning of "minimum" becomes painfully apparent. Minimum is just that. As Merriam Webster says: "the least quantity assignable, admissible, or possible.
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