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Susan Reimer | July 2, 2012
Two women, one a shy British housewife and the other a groundbreaking social scientist, who changed significantly the landscape of family life, died in recent days - and it is worth taking a moment to remember them and their courage. Judith Wallerstein, a psychologist whose research concluded that children bear the scars of their parents' divorce well into adulthood, died at 90 at her daughter's home in Piedmont, Calif. And Lesley Brown, the mother of the world's first "test-tube baby," died of a gall bladder infection at 64, surrounded by the two daughters she bore through in vitro fertilization and her five grandchildren.
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NEWS
By William E. Lori | October 12, 2014
Last Monday, the extraordinary Synod of Bishops to discuss the "Pastoral Challenges of the Family in the Context of Evangelization" began in Rome. The synod represents a key moment in the papacy of Pope Francis and in the life of the Roman Catholic Church, which is looking for more effective ways of communicating what it believes and teaches about marriage and family life and of supporting those who wish to live according to church teaching and are struggling to do so in the face of contemporary challenges.
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FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | August 13, 1993
In the beginning, there was only rock 'n' roll.Now there are car pools and soccer practices and PTAs.To tap into the expanding interests of maturing rock fans, Rolling Stone magazine creator Jann Wenner has added a new publication, Family Life, to his growing list, which also includes Men's Journal. His newest effort hit newsstands this week with a $2.50 cover price. (A one-year subscription is $12.97.)"I like to publish magazines that I feel passionate about," Mr. Wenner says from the New York offices of his company, Straight Arrow Publishers Inc.Family life is a topic about which one would presume Mr. Wenner is passionate these days.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 24, 2014
Ward and June. Ozzie and Harriet. Jim and Margaret Anderson. If you recognize those couples - and if you grew up wishing they were your parents - you likely hearken to a time when the American family was made up of a breadwinning father and a homemaking mother and a couple of kids. We like to think of the 1950s and the early 1960s as the golden age of family life, but it was also a repressive time for women. Only a handful had college degrees, only about 30 percent ventured outside the home to work, and women had little control over the timing and number of the children they bore.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | October 24, 1999
I DON'T KNOW about you, but I haven't said anything right in my house for a long time. My opinions are always unsolicited and inevitably unappreciated. No one cares what I think. But I can't seem to keep my mouth shut, and as a result, I am always in trouble with some member of my family. One harmless little comment from me about, oh, say, a wardrobe choice or a possible college major, and someone gets upset. Sheesh. What a prickly group. I was complaining to my friend Susan, the flight attendant, about the poor reception my comments get, when she flashed me a smile that would melt the chocolate bar in your pocket.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | July 20, 1997
MY AMBITION this summer is to organize and clean out the cellar, the vault for things I think need keeping.Unfortunately, in my case, that means almost everything. I can't bring myself to throw things out. Over the years, I've saved family mementos, the paper routine of my life, and tons of stuff that has come my way.It's all down in the cellar -- not a club room, not a basement, but the kind of rock-walled, humid cavern common to houses built in 1871.My definition of cleaning out the cellar is to go through every box, throw out only what has proven to be worthless, and repack everything worth keeping.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | January 11, 1993
At the point in the baby's birth when the head appeared, male spectators at Harbor Hospital Center could no longer contain themselves."Oh, my God!" yelled one, amazed."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TV CRITIC | September 11, 1999
Bill Sims is a blues musician with a serious drinking problem who took over the household roles of child-rearing and cooking. He's black. Karen Wilson is a corporate manager, the family's primary breadwinner, but she's seriously ill and facing a hysterectomy. She's white.Cicily, their oldest daughter, is away at an elite college and getting one painful lesson after another in elitism and race, while Chaney, their "baby," faces adolescence and her own battles with identity as she tries to start dating.
NEWS
October 9, 1991
Natalia Ginzburg, 75, an author and playwright noted for her deft treatment of family life in Italy, died from cancer at her home in Rome Monday night. Ms. Ginzburg won international recognition with the publication of "Voices in the Evening" (1961) and "Family Sayings" (1963).
FEATURES
By Judith H. Dobrzynski | July 5, 1995
Imagine an American lifestyle where people worked fewer hours and spent more time en famille. Strivers would revamp their work habits, regularly leaving a redrafting of business proposals until the next morning, cutting off meetings at 5 o'clock and foregoing evening phone calls to demanding clients.Rush-hour traffic would probably get worse, and Little League games, soccer matches and Indian Princess meetings would be more crowded. Maybe movie studios would produce more family fare.It could happen, if the thesis advanced by a new study gains currency.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Relatives of a 10-year-old disabled foster child who died at an Anne Arundel County group home last month and the guardian of another resident whose inadequate care there led to a serious illness have filed notice that they intend to sue the state for failing to supervise the facility's operator. An attorney for the two former residents of LifeLine Inc.'s Laurel-area group home said he sent a formal notice to the state treasurer's office that he intends to seek monetary damages for each incident - the details of which were highlighted in a Baltimore Sun investigation of the company.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 1, 2014
Oh, my Lord, where to begin? You already know what this column is about. You know even though we are barely three sentences in. You knew before you saw the headline. There are days in the opinion business when one story makes itself inevitable and unavoidable, one story sucks up all the air in the room. This is one of those times. One story. Well ... two, actually: the misadventures of Cliven Bundy and Donald Sterling. Mr. Bundy, of course, is the Nevada rancher whose refusal to pay fees to allow his cattle to graze on public land made him a cause celebre on the political right.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 29, 2014
In all the reporting of the shootings at The Mall in Columbia, one sentence hit me like a punch in the gut. "His mother right now is struggling for a reason to live," said Ellis Cropper of the woman who raised 19-year-old Darion Marcus Aguilar, who shot two strangers and then himself on Saturday. Struggling for a reason to live. Her son, the younger of her two children, had not only taken his own life - an unbearable tragedy for a mother - he had taken the lives of two other young people.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 22, 2014
Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson declared an unconditional war on poverty, and he put Sargent Shriver in charge of leading the fight. Since then, by some estimates, we have reduced the number of poor in this country from one in four to about one in six. But more than 46 million Americans continue to live below the poverty line and more than half of them - 25 million - are women and children. Today Mr. Shriver's daughter, Maria, continues her father's campaign with a new report on women on the cusp of poverty, about whom she writes, "Many of these women feel they are a single incident - one broken bone, one broken-down car, one missed paycheck - away from the brink.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
People lined up outside the Baltimore Convention Center on Wednesday well before the 58th annual Goodwill Thanksgiving Dinner began at noon. Within the first hour, dozens departed with bellies full and leftovers in tow, filing past hundreds more eager to be fed. "This food is lovely, and I don't eat just anybody's cooking," announced Donald Graham of Baltimore, one of about 3,000 people who received tickets from nearby community and outreach centers...
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Regarding Susan Reimer 's recent column on elder care, while your parents may have many "talks" with you over the years none rival when the tables turn and you need to facilitate a complex conversation with your parents about elder care ( "How much are they worth to you?" Oct. 9). Even when you start the conversation, it's hard to foresee what sacrifices you and your family might have to make in caring for an aging parent over the long term. Still, those who are thinking ahead about elder care have avoided a big mistake, which is not to think about it at all. While it's smart to initiate these conversations early and often, family dynamics can be complicated and factor into the planning process.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 24, 1995
MOSCOW -- Natalya Baranskaya created a sensation in 1969 when she published a short novel about the modern Soviet woman, vividly describing a life consumed by enormous drudgery and impossible demands.A quarter-century later, she remains a tart observer of the nation's social progress."Of course, life has changed for women," Mrs. Baranskaya says. "It's gotten much worse."Mrs. Baranskaya, 86, lives in a small apartment on the eighth floor of a tired-looking building in an industrial section of Moscow.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | June 16, 1991
Marie has a house and kids. Bill has a house and kids, too. Now they're going to marry and take on one of life's great challenges: blending families. So where should they all live?Ideally, the newlyweds should resist the temptation to move the whole troop into either Bill or Marie's home. Instead, they should find a third home where everyone in the blended family can make a fresh beginning, therapists and housing specialists agree."I vote for new for everybody," says Carolyn Janik, author of "Positive Moves," a guide to relocation.
NEWS
By Joe Jones | April 21, 2013
From Bangor to Peoria, in the Huffington Post and in Forbes Magazine, the press is focusing on the minimum wage. While we hear and read about it constantly these days, many of us never take the time to reflect on what it really means. When seen up close, as I do every day here in Baltimore at the Center for Urban Families, the real meaning of "minimum" becomes painfully apparent. Minimum is just that. As Merriam Webster says: "the least quantity assignable, admissible, or possible.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 13, 2013
Erin Callan was the face of Lehman Brothers in 2008 as it battled insolvency rumors. Fresh, pretty, smart and confidently articulate, she worked feverishly to try to talk nervous investors out of jumping ship. But when the company imploded in 2008, she did, too. After taking a couple of place-holder jobs, she disappeared. The most powerful woman on Wall Street before it all came tumbling down was only 41. The New York gossips eventually found her in East Hampton, in what passes for a cottage in the woods there, taking spin classes and living on the cash-in of her Lehman shares, now married to a high-school classmate, a handsome New York City firefighter.
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