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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1996
In Iran, Azar Nafisi, a professor of English, writes about the strong and clever women in Persian classical literature and the pallid female characters in contemporary Iranian fiction.In Bangladesh, Yasmeen Murshed, chairwoman of an Asia-Pacific network for women in politics, teaches women how to run for office and write legislation enhancing their rights.In Malaysia, Norani Othman, an anthropologist, leads a movement to reinterpret Islamic law and strip it of centuries of accretions that discriminate against women.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
A state appeals court overturned the criminal kidnapping convictions yesterday of an Iranian charged with taking his two children to live with him in Iran in violation of a court order granting custody to his former wife.But the Court of Special Appeals let stand the parental abduction convictions against Hossein Nasri Ghajari, 53.Mr. Ghajari, 53, was given a 10-year suspended sentence March 15, 1995, by Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. He was convicted of two criminal counts of kidnapping and two of parental kidnapping for taking his children with him to Iran, where they had lived from 1990 to 1993.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
A state appeals court overturned the criminal kidnapping convictions yesterday of an Iranian charged with taking his two children to live with him in Iran in violation of a court order granting custody to his former wife.But the Court of Special Appeals let stand the parental abduction convictions against Hossein Nasri Ghajari, 53.Mr. Ghajari, 53, was given a 10-year suspended sentence March 15, 1995, by Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. He was convicted of two criminal counts of kidnapping and two of parental kidnapping for taking his children with him to Iran, where they had lived from 1990 to 1993.
NEWS
March 22, 1996
A GOOD LAW involves two essential ingredients. It must aim to accomplish something worthwhile, and it must be crafted to fulfill that aim only. Anne Arundel County's so-called "family conveyance" law meets only the first of these criteria. Its goal to make it easy for families with property to carve out lots for children and other close relatives makes sense. But faulty construction of the law has allowed it to be used in a way it was never intended as a loophole for development in areas where growth is not planned.
FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,CHRONICLE FEATURES | January 21, 1996
Workers used to worry that if they took time off for family or medical reasons, they would get fired. Now a federal law guarantees that you can be out for up to 12 weeks per year in certain cases and still have a job. Unfortunately, it isn't always that easy.Many businesses don't like the Family and Medical Leave Act. While it's illegal for them to punish you for taking leave, companies have found legal ways to, in effect, do just that.In a nutshell, the law protects most people who work for a company with 50 or more employees and have clocked at least 1,250 hours during the past year.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 12, 1995
Dorothy A. Landsman, a homemaker and matriarch of a Northwest Baltimore police family, died Friday of complications of a stroke at the home of a daughter in Catonsville. She was 80.Mrs. Landsman's husband, three sons, three grandsons (one is a police cadet) and a son-in-law all are or have been police officers.Her husband, Raymond Landsman, who joined the Baltimore City Police Department in 1936, was the second Jewish officer in the department, according to a son, Jerry Landsman Sr. He retired as a lieutenant in the Northwestern District in 1963 and died in 1986.
NEWS
April 6, 1995
Family CourtThank you for your March 25 editorial in support of a family court for Maryland.I chaired the subcommittee of the Governor's Task Force on Family Law investigating the need for such a court.I, together with other members of the task force, traveled throughout the state listening to citizens' concerns regarding family law and the process available to them for resolving their issues.We heard repeatedly, and without solicitation, their unhappiness with our present system.The only opposition we heard then, and have ever heard since, has been from judges.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | December 27, 1994
Kathleen Murphy wants Maryland's judges and lawyers to stand up and listen to her silence.The Westminster bank teller, who in 1992 was ordered to pay her ex-husband $315 a month in child support, on Dec. 15 staged the second of what she hopes will be many "silent marches" at the Carroll County Courthouse, protesting the way state courts handle domestic disputes."
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | December 25, 1994
Christmas is supposed to be the season for goodwill, peace and family, and it is not the appropriate time for recriminations. But for a number of divorced mothers and fathers in Carroll and other Maryland counties, this festive holiday is an unpleasant reminder of the injustices they suffered in the state court system.In Carroll, the ranks of the unhappily divorced women keep increasing. Nearly all of them have lost custody of their children, are paying irrational levels of child support and spend much of their income paying lawyers' fees.
FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,Chronicle Features | November 20, 1994
When Philip Stern took three months off from work after the birth of his first child, he wasn't sure his job would still be there when he returned to the Eastman Kodak Co. in Rochester, N.Y. Two years later, Mr. Stern's second baby is due imminently and he plans to take another leave. But this time he won't have to depend on Kodak's kindness -- federal law guarantees he can return to the same job (as a product engineer), or to an equivalent position.Mr. Stern is among the growing number of people who are benefiting from a 15-month-old federal law called the Family and Medical Leave Act. It says that employees at many companies have the right to take up to 12 weeks per year off from work for health emergencies or the arrival of a child.
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