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NEWS
April 25, 2000
THOSE WHO DOUBT the wisdom of returning Elian Gonzalez to his father and half-brother ought to look at the photographs of the family reunion. They show the 6-year-old happier than he has appeared since arriving on these shores after the death of his mother. The authenticity of these photographs is now beyond doubt, and so should be the necessity of the raid that brought Elian back to his father. Though the raid on Lazaro Gonzalez's Miami house is being criticized, there is no dispute about the professional skill with which it was carried out -- successfully and speedily.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 2000
WASHINGTON -- If the Elian Gonzalez case becomes a custody dispute in Florida family court or runs its course as an immigration case in the federal courts, the result would be the same: Either way, legal experts say, the father will likely get the boy. As a result, it would be up to Juan Miguel Gonzalez, the Cuban boy's father, to decide whether 6-year-old Elian stays in this country or goes back to Cuba. The father's lawyer said yesterday they eventually will go to Cuba together. "The father certainly ought to win under both immigration law and custody law -- take your choice," says David Abraham, a law professor at the University of Miami.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2000
When Phyllis Brown went to college, her father suggested that she take education courses because someday she might want to become a teacher. Teaching was a good job for a woman, he told her, whether or not she ever married. That was in the 1970s and Brown, the youngest of four children and the only girl in her family, devised a plan to deal with her father, a well-established and well-meaning lawyer in Rockville. "I decided not to take any education courses," says Brown, a 46-year-old mother of two. Instead, she followed her father into law, a career decision that paid off this month when she was formally appointed to one of three highly sought-after domestic master posts in Baltimore County Circuit Court.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 13, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno affirmed the decision yesterday of federal immigration officials to send young Elian Gonzalez back to his father in Cuba, in effect ignoring a Florida judge's decision to award temporary custody to the boy's great-uncle in Miami. "The question of who may speak for a six-year-old child in applying for admission or asylum is a matter of federal immigration law," Reno wrote yesterday in a letter to lawyers for the boy's great-uncle. "The Florida court's order has no force or effect."
NEWS
By Jane C. Murphy | May 3, 1998
As we approach Mother's Day, it is worth re-examining our understanding of what it means to be a mother.At first blush, the law seems an unlikely place to turn. Until recently, legal scholars have written little about the subject of motherhood. There is even confusion about how to define "mother" under the law. As Columbia Law School Professor Carol Sanger said, "'Who is a mother?' no longer has a simple answer, now that genetic contribution, gestation and stroller pushing may each be provided by a different woman."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1997
Judge John F. Fader II's benign, fatherly appearance doesn't fool anybody once he starts lecturing troubled families in his Baltimore County courtroom.The Circuit Court judge tells a divorced couple fighting over visitation with their teen-age sons: "We can't have two armed camps at their weddings."He tells a belligerent man in leg chains who owes $13,000 in child support: "There are murderers, there are pedophiles, and there are people who don't pay child support."As the Maryland Court of Appeals considers establishing family courts in Maryland's largest counties, Fader has carved a niche for himself as an authority on family law -- divorce, custody, child support, domestic violence.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Bruce A. Kaufman, "the dean of family law" who was recently elected chairman of the American Bar Association's family law section, died Friday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of cancer. He was 50."He was one of the leading lights in family law, a great lawyer, but, better than that, he was a great person," said Judge Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals, who knew Kaufman for many years.Kaufman of Chevy Chase was a Baltimore native who graduated from the University of Maryland Law School in 1972.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1996
The two attorneys running Carroll County's only all-female law firm are daughters of Sparrows Point steelworkers with a strong desire to help their clients in and out of the courtroom.Despite their similar roots, Kathi Hill, 38, a former assistant state's attorney in Carroll, and Zoa Barnes, 40, who used to work as a civilian in the field of biomedicine and genetics at Fort Detrick in Frederick, did not meet until 1990."I entered law school, began working as a law clerk and got to know Kathi in her role as a prosecutor," Barnes, who also has been a volunteer counselor, said last week.
NEWS
September 20, 1996
WITH GOV. PARRIS N. Glendening's decision to use state dollars to fund nutrition and other welfare benefits for children of legal immigrants, Maryland has put itself in the forefront of states that are refusing to live with one of the most controversial provisions of the welfare reform bill passed by Congress and signed by President Clinton.For Maryland, doing the right thing was made easier by savings from lower caseloads that offset the projected $9 million annual cost. Even so, the decision affects only families with children, leaving many refugees and other adults adrift.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1996
A 17-month project designed to provide legal services to people embroiled in family disputes, including divorce cases, has found that as many as 12,000 such people in Maryland each year forego hiring a lawyer, often because they can't afford it.The needs of these people can be met with a range of lower-cost alternatives to traditional lawyering, according to a study conducted by the University of Maryland Law School's assisted pro se project.Among options suggested by the study are counseling sessions with law students trained in family law and increased use of mediation.
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