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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2004
Mary M. Kramer came to family law by way of a boss with old-school views. In the 1980s, a male lawyer hired her and said, "You're a woman, you'll do the divorce cases." William V. Tucker first worked with kids and the criminal justice system as a police officer in New Jersey, when he was part of a program similar to DARE. Kramer and Tucker will bring their diverse experiences to their latest jobs as Howard County Circuit Court's newest masters in chancery, filling vacancies left by two masters who retired from their seats this fall.
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NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Between the entrances to two Carroll County courtrooms is a door with a paper sign reading "Please walk in." Anybody who does finds a suite of offices where parents can work out custody battles while their children play in a room adorned with a mural of forest animals frolicking in a green meadow. This is the new home of the Carroll Circuit Court's Family Law Administration in the Courthouse Annex. In the past, children would sometimes amuse themselves in a judge's chambers while the grownups settled their legal differences.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Between the entrances to two Carroll County courtrooms is a door with a paper sign reading "Please walk in." Anybody who does finds a suite of offices where parents can work out custody battles while their children play in a room adorned with a mural of forest animals frolicking in a green meadow. This is the new home of the Carroll Circuit Court's Family Law Administration in the Courthouse Annex. In the past, children would sometimes amuse themselves in a judge's chambers while the grownups settled their legal differences.
NEWS
October 26, 2003
McDaniel College to hold town hall meeting on drugs McDaniel College will hold a town hall debate on the drug war at 7 p.m. Wednesday in McDaniel Lounge. Eric E. Sterling, president of the Criminal Justice Policy Foundation, and Anthony J. O'Donnell, minority whip for the Maryland House of Delegates, will discuss "The Drug War: Our Domestic Vietnam?" The event is free to the public. Information: 410-857-2294. Transportation Dept. seeks residents' feedback The Maryland Department of Transportation will hold a series of open houses and public meetings around the state for citizens to voice their ideas and comments on the state's transportation network.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gray and Ellen Gray,KNIGHT RIDDER TRIBUNE | August 23, 2002
It's taken decades, but Hamilton Burger finally has his revenge. The district attorney who lost to Perry Mason week after hopeless week, year after excruciating year -- could, if he were alive today, see prosecutors celebrated by the same medium that once treated them like so many crash dummies, foils for flamboyant defense lawyers with right on their side. As Law & Order producer Dick Wolf is fond of reminding people, TV-watchers are seldom more than a click away from one of his cops-and-prosecutors shows.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2002
If Judge Catherine Curran O'Malley feels like talking these days, she should probably spend some time with Sheila K. Sachs. Sachs and her husband, Stephen H. Sachs, were like the Judge O'Malley and Mayor Martin O'Malley of a generation ago. Even today, Sachs is a bigtime city lawyer, a specialist in family law - alimony, child custody, that sort of thing, and often represents the local celebrities when they wind up in divorce court. But in January 1979, she was a part-time attorney who was in the midst of an ethical conflict that would greatly influence her career.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
He's arranged seating for confirmations and weddings because warring parents couldn't agree on who would sit where. He's thrilled and disappointed thousands of adults in decisions on child custody and support. In nearly two decades on the bench, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. has presided over the dissolution of countless failed relationships, and he's patiently dealt with the couples who return to his courtroom year after year. "When a case comes in, everybody loves you. When they keep coming back, at least one of them doesn't love you," Cawood said with characteristically dry wit. At 65, Cawood, considered the grandfather of family law matters in the county and an expert in the field throughout the state, is leaving the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
He's arranged seating for confirmations and weddings because warring parents couldn't agree on who would sit where. He's thrilled and disappointed thousands of adults in decisions on child custody and support. In nearly two decades on the bench, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. has presided over the dissolution of countless failed relationships, and he's patiently dealt with the couples who return to his courtroom year after year. "When a case comes in, everybody loves you. When they keep coming back, at least one of them doesn't love you," Cawood said with characteristically dry wit. At 65, Cawood, considered the grandfather of family law matters in the county and an expert in the field throughout the state, is leaving the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2001
Who gets the sale proceeds of a marital home when a couple divorces? Is the money divided equally, even though the home was acquired using property or funds inherited by one of the spouses? Susanne Hudson of Rock Hall wrote that she and her husband bought a house 26 years ago for $60,000. Both of their names are on the deed. She used $20,000 of her inheritance for the down payment. She and her husband now are separated. They've been working through a mediator to reach a settlement on all their assets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 9, 2000
There were lawyers, judges and representatives from a number of family advocacy groups, but this wasn't your garden variety legal proceeding. No, this get-together was your garden party variety -- as in the annual Spring Lawn Party and Silent Auction for Alternative Directions, Inc. A casual, inviting atmosphere permeated the gardens surrounding the Towson home of Mary Joel Davis, Alternative Directions' executive director. Some of the 220 guests brought their home-cooked specialties, such as crab dip and sweet potato pie, creating an almost-endless buffet and giving the event a real family feel.
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