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NEWS
May 27, 2014
Perhaps someday in the future, forensic psychiatrists and others will analyze the circumstances of last Friday's mass shooting near Santa Barbara, Calif. from medical records, family interviews and YouTube videos and determine definitively what was going inside the mind of suspected gunman Elliot Rodger. That he hated women was obviously a significant piece of the puzzle. Was it that anger that caused him to plan the rampage, post his manifesto on the Internet and ultimately kill six people and injure 13 before killing himself, or was that simply the delusion on which a suicidal 22-year-old became obsessed?
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Paul A. Dorf, a former state senator and Baltimore City circuit judge who championed the use of arbitration and mediation as alternatives to an overcrowded court system, died of renal cancer Thursday at his home in Harbor Court. He was 86. "Paul brought a very strong spirit of collegiality, high ethical standards, energy and enthusiasm to the practice of law," said Oren D. Saltzman, managing partner of the law firm of Adelberg, Rudow, Dorf & Hendler, LLC, which Judge Dorf joined in 1983 after retiring from the bench.
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Marc B. Noren, a family law attorney and former manager for the Civil Division of the Clerk's Office of the Baltimore City Circuit Court, died of respiratory failure on Aug. 25, at his home in Pikesville. He was 59 and had suffered for several years from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. Mr. Noren was a fixture in the Baltimore City court system and family law circles, having begun his career at the age of 19 at the Baltimore City clerk's office. By age 22, he was a leader in one of the civil courts.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Bruce A. Kaufman, "the dean of family law" who was recently elected chairman of the American Bar Association's family law section, died Friday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of cancer. He was 50."He was one of the leading lights in family law, a great lawyer, but, better than that, he was a great person," said Judge Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals, who knew Kaufman for many years.Kaufman of Chevy Chase was a Baltimore native who graduated from the University of Maryland Law School in 1972.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
A family law service for moderate-income residents has been expanded into Carroll County.The Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Service -- a nonprofit, statewide group of attorneys that also provides civil legal assistance for low-income residents -- began the Carroll County program in mid-October to help families with divorce, custody, adoption or visitation cases, said Winifred Borden, executive director.The service group also expanded the program into Calvert, Caroline, Cecil, Charles, Garrett, Howard, Somerset and Worcester counties last month.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 2000
WASHINGTON -- If the Elian Gonzalez case becomes a custody dispute in Florida family court or runs its course as an immigration case in the federal courts, the result would be the same: Either way, legal experts say, the father will likely get the boy. As a result, it would be up to Juan Miguel Gonzalez, the Cuban boy's father, to decide whether 6-year-old Elian stays in this country or goes back to Cuba. The father's lawyer said yesterday they eventually will go to Cuba together. "The father certainly ought to win under both immigration law and custody law -- take your choice," says David Abraham, a law professor at the University of Miami.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 12, 1995
Dorothy A. Landsman, a homemaker and matriarch of a Northwest Baltimore police family, died Friday of complications of a stroke at the home of a daughter in Catonsville. She was 80.Mrs. Landsman's husband, three sons, three grandsons (one is a police cadet) and a son-in-law all are or have been police officers.Her husband, Raymond Landsman, who joined the Baltimore City Police Department in 1936, was the second Jewish officer in the department, according to a son, Jerry Landsman Sr. He retired as a lieutenant in the Northwestern District in 1963 and died in 1986.
FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,Chronicle Features | November 20, 1994
When Philip Stern took three months off from work after the birth of his first child, he wasn't sure his job would still be there when he returned to the Eastman Kodak Co. in Rochester, N.Y. Two years later, Mr. Stern's second baby is due imminently and he plans to take another leave. But this time he won't have to depend on Kodak's kindness -- federal law guarantees he can return to the same job (as a product engineer), or to an equivalent position.Mr. Stern is among the growing number of people who are benefiting from a 15-month-old federal law called the Family and Medical Leave Act. It says that employees at many companies have the right to take up to 12 weeks per year off from work for health emergencies or the arrival of a child.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2001
Who gets the sale proceeds of a marital home when a couple divorces? Is the money divided equally, even though the home was acquired using property or funds inherited by one of the spouses? Susanne Hudson of Rock Hall wrote that she and her husband bought a house 26 years ago for $60,000. Both of their names are on the deed. She used $20,000 of her inheritance for the down payment. She and her husband now are separated. They've been working through a mediator to reach a settlement on all their assets.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1996
In Iran, Azar Nafisi, a professor of English, writes about the strong and clever women in Persian classical literature and the pallid female characters in contemporary Iranian fiction.In Bangladesh, Yasmeen Murshed, chairwoman of an Asia-Pacific network for women in politics, teaches women how to run for office and write legislation enhancing their rights.In Malaysia, Norani Othman, an anthropologist, leads a movement to reinterpret Islamic law and strip it of centuries of accretions that discriminate against women.
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