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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
George Warren "Moose" Mix Sr., a well-known Towson attorney whose legal expertise included administrative, criminal and family law, died May 4 of heart failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The 30-year Lutherville resident was 74. "I knew Warren when I was a prosecutor and later as a defense attorney, and he was often in three jurisdictions during a single day. He was a stand-up, honest and hardworking guy when it came to his clients. He'd fight for his people," said Gov. Martin J. O'Malley.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1996
The two attorneys running Carroll County's only all-female law firm are daughters of Sparrows Point steelworkers with a strong desire to help their clients in and out of the courtroom.Despite their similar roots, Kathi Hill, 38, a former assistant state's attorney in Carroll, and Zoa Barnes, 40, who used to work as a civilian in the field of biomedicine and genetics at Fort Detrick in Frederick, did not meet until 1990."I entered law school, began working as a law clerk and got to know Kathi in her role as a prosecutor," Barnes, who also has been a volunteer counselor, said last week.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
George Kunz should have slowed by now. At 66, the former All-Pro tackle should be golfing or fishing or appearing at autograph shows, a battle-scarred old Colt telling tales about his time in the NFL trenches. Not Kunz. He's an attorney, all 6 feet 5 and 255 pounds of him, just three years out of law school and determined to make this career as estimable as his first. A Colt from 1975 through 1980, he anchored the offensive line and helped Baltimore win three straight AFC East championships.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2000
When Phyllis Brown went to college, her father suggested that she take education courses because someday she might want to become a teacher. Teaching was a good job for a woman, he told her, whether or not she ever married. That was in the 1970s and Brown, the youngest of four children and the only girl in her family, devised a plan to deal with her father, a well-established and well-meaning lawyer in Rockville. "I decided not to take any education courses," says Brown, a 46-year-old mother of two. Instead, she followed her father into law, a career decision that paid off this month when she was formally appointed to one of three highly sought-after domestic master posts in Baltimore County Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
A state appeals court overturned the criminal kidnapping convictions yesterday of an Iranian charged with taking his two children to live with him in Iran in violation of a court order granting custody to his former wife.But the Court of Special Appeals let stand the parental abduction convictions against Hossein Nasri Ghajari, 53.Mr. Ghajari, 53, was given a 10-year suspended sentence March 15, 1995, by Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. He was convicted of two criminal counts of kidnapping and two of parental kidnapping for taking his children with him to Iran, where they had lived from 1990 to 1993.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
A state appeals court overturned the criminal kidnapping convictions yesterday of an Iranian charged with taking his two children to live with him in Iran in violation of a court order granting custody to his former wife.But the Court of Special Appeals let stand the parental abduction convictions against Hossein Nasri Ghajari, 53.Mr. Ghajari, 53, was given a 10-year suspended sentence March 15, 1995, by Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. He was convicted of two criminal counts of kidnapping and two of parental kidnapping for taking his children with him to Iran, where they had lived from 1990 to 1993.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | December 27, 1994
Kathleen Murphy wants Maryland's judges and lawyers to stand up and listen to her silence.The Westminster bank teller, who in 1992 was ordered to pay her ex-husband $315 a month in child support, on Dec. 15 staged the second of what she hopes will be many "silent marches" at the Carroll County Courthouse, protesting the way state courts handle domestic disputes."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1997
Judge John F. Fader II's benign, fatherly appearance doesn't fool anybody once he starts lecturing troubled families in his Baltimore County courtroom.The Circuit Court judge tells a divorced couple fighting over visitation with their teen-age sons: "We can't have two armed camps at their weddings."He tells a belligerent man in leg chains who owes $13,000 in child support: "There are murderers, there are pedophiles, and there are people who don't pay child support."As the Maryland Court of Appeals considers establishing family courts in Maryland's largest counties, Fader has carved a niche for himself as an authority on family law -- divorce, custody, child support, domestic violence.
NEWS
October 26, 2003
McDaniel College to hold town hall meeting on drugs McDaniel College will hold a town hall debate on the drug war at 7 p.m. Wednesday in McDaniel Lounge. Eric E. Sterling, president of the Criminal Justice Policy Foundation, and Anthony J. O'Donnell, minority whip for the Maryland House of Delegates, will discuss "The Drug War: Our Domestic Vietnam?" The event is free to the public. Information: 410-857-2294. Transportation Dept. seeks residents' feedback The Maryland Department of Transportation will hold a series of open houses and public meetings around the state for citizens to voice their ideas and comments on the state's transportation network.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
The creation of a family court in Maryland to hear cases ranging from divorces to juvenile delinquency was widely endorsed yesterday as a way to better handle increasingly complex social issues.But many state judges -- including Chief Judge Robert C. Murphy -- were either opposed or cool to the Schaefer administration's measure as burdensome to the courts.And a key lawmaker dismissed it as unnecessary, saying the Circuit Court has the power to create a family division."There isn't any question that a family court is needed now. . . . It's highly specialized," said Gov. William Donald Schaefer, unveiling the legislation at a morning news conference.
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