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NEWS
By Barbara Babb and Mitchell Karpf | July 13, 2010
Unfortunately for so many in our society, family breakup is a fact of life. When a family dissolves, there is much more than furniture, houses or cars at stake — the identity of that family, including its children, is in the mix. That's why the way our legal system and our society respond to family dissolution needs to change. While people read about the travails of celebrities who commit marital infidelity, perhaps we should be upset that the huge headlines are not about the everyday families — those who often are devastated by their trek through the adversarial legal process that constitutes much of family law. The parties may emerge having disposed of a marriage but also having traumatized loved ones, exhausted their resources and diminished the well-being and self-esteem of their children and of each other.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 13, 2014
Commentator Ned Holstein makes excellent points about the values of shared parenting agreements ( "Joint custody should be the rule, not the exception," Oct. 8). As a policy analyst in very progressive California, Mr. Holstein and I have differing viewpoints on some issues; however, shared parenting has been proven time and again to be the most effective and beneficial custody arrangement. My particular focus regarding custody issues is on domestic violence - its prevalence, reduction and role in custody disputes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 9, 2000
There were lawyers, judges and representatives from a number of family advocacy groups, but this wasn't your garden variety legal proceeding. No, this get-together was your garden party variety -- as in the annual Spring Lawn Party and Silent Auction for Alternative Directions, Inc. A casual, inviting atmosphere permeated the gardens surrounding the Towson home of Mary Joel Davis, Alternative Directions' executive director. Some of the 220 guests brought their home-cooked specialties, such as crab dip and sweet potato pie, creating an almost-endless buffet and giving the event a real family feel.
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Marc B. Noren, a family law attorney and former manager for the Civil Division of the Clerk's Office of the Baltimore City Circuit Court, died of respiratory failure on Aug. 25, at his home in Pikesville. He was 59 and had suffered for several years from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. Mr. Noren was a fixture in the Baltimore City court system and family law circles, having begun his career at the age of 19 at the Baltimore City clerk's office. By age 22, he was a leader in one of the civil courts.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 15, 2009
Monica Doherty, an attorney who worked in family law, ended her life July 1 in Largo, Fla. The Wyman Park resident was 40. Born Monica Christine Doherty in Virginia Beach, Va., and raised in Dunedin, Fla., she earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Florida in Gainesville. After moving to Baltimore in 1999, she taught computer science at the Roland Park Middle School. She received a degree from the University of Baltimore School of Law in 2005. At her death she was practicing law in Towson and worked in family law. She enjoyed travel and outdoor activities and completed the 2006 Baltimore Marathon.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Mercedes C. Samborsky, a musician who changed careers later in life and became an attorney whose specialty was family law, died Jan. 31 of heart failure at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center. She was 84. "Mercedes was always very vigorous in representing all of her clients, and no one was more vigorous in representing the position of her clients. She was very hardworking," said retired Baltimore County Circuit Judge John F. Fader II. "She appeared before me on several occasions, and she was always vigilant to the needs of her clients.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2004
Mary M. Kramer came to family law by way of a boss with old-school views. In the 1980s, a male lawyer hired her and said, "You're a woman, you'll do the divorce cases." William V. Tucker first worked with kids and the criminal justice system as a police officer in New Jersey, when he was part of a program similar to DARE. Kramer and Tucker will bring their diverse experiences to their latest jobs as Howard County Circuit Court's newest masters in chancery, filling vacancies left by two masters who retired from their seats this fall.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Between the entrances to two Carroll County courtrooms is a door with a paper sign reading "Please walk in." Anybody who does finds a suite of offices where parents can work out custody battles while their children play in a room adorned with a mural of forest animals frolicking in a green meadow. This is the new home of the Carroll Circuit Court's Family Law Administration in the Courthouse Annex. In the past, children would sometimes amuse themselves in a judge's chambers while the grownups settled their legal differences.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1996
A 17-month project designed to provide legal services to people embroiled in family disputes, including divorce cases, has found that as many as 12,000 such people in Maryland each year forego hiring a lawyer, often because they can't afford it.The needs of these people can be met with a range of lower-cost alternatives to traditional lawyering, according to a study conducted by the University of Maryland Law School's assisted pro se project.Among options suggested by the study are counseling sessions with law students trained in family law and increased use of mediation.
NEWS
By Jane C. Murphy | May 3, 1998
As we approach Mother's Day, it is worth re-examining our understanding of what it means to be a mother.At first blush, the law seems an unlikely place to turn. Until recently, legal scholars have written little about the subject of motherhood. There is even confusion about how to define "mother" under the law. As Columbia Law School Professor Carol Sanger said, "'Who is a mother?' no longer has a simple answer, now that genetic contribution, gestation and stroller pushing may each be provided by a different woman."
NEWS
June 18, 2014
The Sun makes endorsements in the following races in Anne Arundel County: District 30-A Voters in this Annapolis area district have the rare privilege of being represented by incumbent House Speaker Mike Busch, and Democrats should avail themselves of the opportunity to nominate him for an eighth term. His record in leadership has been commendable, and he has done much for the district as well. But the redrawn district also affords Democrats the chance to capture a second seat in the two-person district.
NEWS
May 27, 2014
Perhaps someday in the future, forensic psychiatrists and others will analyze the circumstances of last Friday's mass shooting near Santa Barbara, Calif. from medical records, family interviews and YouTube videos and determine definitively what was going inside the mind of suspected gunman Elliot Rodger. That he hated women was obviously a significant piece of the puzzle. Was it that anger that caused him to plan the rampage, post his manifesto on the Internet and ultimately kill six people and injure 13 before killing himself, or was that simply the delusion on which a suicidal 22-year-old became obsessed?
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 18, 2014
Kids today, with their different music, outrageous fashion, strange slang and devil-may-care attitude: what's the world coming to? It's coming to the likes of Carley Bynion, a high school senior who has been making teddy bears to give to children unfortunate enough to have been involved in tragic situations. The 17-year-old from Bel Air, who attends John Carroll, started making the stuffed animals as part of a senior project designed to get students to do something that challenges their comfort zones.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Mercedes C. Samborsky, a musician who changed careers later in life and became an attorney whose specialty was family law, died Jan. 31 of heart failure at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center. She was 84. "Mercedes was always very vigorous in representing all of her clients, and no one was more vigorous in representing the position of her clients. She was very hardworking," said retired Baltimore County Circuit Judge John F. Fader II. "She appeared before me on several occasions, and she was always vigilant to the needs of her clients.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
George Kunz should have slowed by now. At 66, the former All-Pro tackle should be golfing or fishing or appearing at autograph shows, a battle-scarred old Colt telling tales about his time in the NFL trenches. Not Kunz. He's an attorney, all 6 feet 5 and 255 pounds of him, just three years out of law school and determined to make this career as estimable as his first. A Colt from 1975 through 1980, he anchored the offensive line and helped Baltimore win three straight AFC East championships.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
William O. Goldstein, a Korean War veteran who practiced law in Baltimore for half a century, died Aug. 21 of kidney failure at Roland Park Place. He was 87. The son of Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, an internationally known urological surgeon, and Elsie May Goldstein, a homemaker and volunteer, William Osler Goldstein was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park and Guilford. After graduating in 1945 from City College, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1949 from Washington College in Chestertown.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Between the entrances to two Carroll County courtrooms is a door with a paper sign reading "Please walk in." Anybody who does finds a suite of offices where parents can work out custody battles while their children play in a room adorned with a mural of forest animals frolicking in a green meadow. This is the new home of the Carroll Circuit Court's Family Law Administration in the Courthouse Annex. In the past, children would sometimes amuse themselves in a judge's chambers while the grownups settled their legal differences.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | July 26, 2009
Michael E. Loney took a long weekend of forced retirement when the calendar shoved him out of his judicial chambers. "I am statutorily senile," he said, referring to the state's requirement that judges retire when they reach age 70. After 19-plus years on the bench, Loney packed up his judicial chambers on the fourth floor of the Anne Arundel County Courthouse and was gone July 16. Five days later, he was back. Like many judges around the state, he is working part time in retirement - balancing golf, travel and work around the house with work at the courthouse.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Marianna Inga Burt, an attorney who represented children, died of cardiovascular disease March 12 at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 80 and lived in the Tuscany-Canterbury section of North Baltimore. Born Marianna Koenig in Hoganas, Sweden, she was the daughter of a chemist, Walter Koenig, and his wife, Elisabeth. She and her family moved to Germany in 1944 and lived in Stendal. She graduated from high school in what became East Germany during the Soviet occupation. Her family eventually left East Germany and relocated to West Germany.
NEWS
January 19, 2013
Among the key disclosures during the on-going gun control debate is the amazing lack of historical knowledge of the Constitution ("Obama pledges fight for gun laws," Jan. 17). When apparently well-educated political leaders such as Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York argue that constitutional gun rights were to protect hunting and Rep. John Lewis of Georgia states that they were conceived to defend against foreign invasion, it reveals some serious gaps in American education. Founding fathers as politically diverse as Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson stated clearly that armed self-defense under the Second Amendment was to warn corruptible rulers of their limits.
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