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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 8, 2010
Christina Rose Schauble, a freelance news reporter who wrote on legal and family issues, died of cancer April 1 at Frederick Memorial Hospital. The former Highlandtown resident was 58. Born in Baltimore and raised here and in Richmond, Va., she earned a degree in journalism from the University of Maryland, College Park, where she was a reporter for the Diamondback school newspaper. A friend, Rosalia Scalia, recalled her "signature was her long blond hair and her ever-present cigarette."
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NEWS
September 2, 2008
Statistically, the most likely profile of a neglectful or abusive parent is a 30-year-old, college-educated white woman who has a job. Yet in Maryland, African-American children are far more likely than their white counterparts to be removed from their homes by child welfare officials because of maltreatment. A recent study by Advocates for Children and Youth, a group that lobbies for children's issues in Maryland, found that while African-Americans make up only a third of the state's children, they constitute nearly three-quarters of the children removed from their homes, and are five times more likely than white children to be placed in group or foster home care.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | April 30, 2007
Each Saturday, Ted Sophocleus visits the grave of his middle daughter in Woodlawn, catching her up on the news of the past week, tidying up and leaving flowers for her. The ritual brings scant comfort to Sophocleus, a state delegate from Linthicum still mourning the loss of Dina Sophocleus Furrow, who died in July 2005 when she was pitched head-first from her husband's motorcycle into a guardrail on her 38th birthday. A short drive away, Stanley R. Furrow, 41, is in a cell, sentenced April 20 to a year in the Anne Arundel County jail after being convicted of manslaughter and driving his Harley- Davidson while drunk.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | January 2, 2007
The lights are always on at Campbell and Co.'s offices in Towson. Across time zones in a dozen countries, its traders are betting on the world's financial markets, millions of dollars at a time. Those transactions have made Keith Campbell a rich man. Now they are helping to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. Since 1998, when he started the Keith Campbell Foundation for the Environment, the 64-year-old investment manager has given away more than $20 million - much of it to fund the bay cleanup.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 21, 2006
The resignation Tuesday of Maryland Historical Society Executive Director W. Eric Emerson - less than four months after taking the job - caught staff and board members off guard, though his indecision had been evident, museum officials said. Emerson and board members say he resigned for family reasons. In a statement, board President Henry Stansbury said Emerson, who headed the South Carolina Historical Society before being appointed July 1 to the Maryland position, realized that "it is really in his family's best interest to remain in Charleston" because he had two young children in school there.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 29, 2004
With impeccable timing, PBS tonight presents a Frontline documentary that explores the roots of George W. Bush's religious beliefs and how those beliefs have influenced his policies, particularly his decision to wage war in Iraq. Called The Jesus Factor, the program is an incisive report, solidly grounded in the expertise of religious leaders even as it serves as a cautionary tale about the dangers of using God to justify the political policies of man. Produced by Raney Aronson, the film is structured as a journey - the spiritual journey of Bush, from his alcoholic early adulthood to his life as an openly religious world leader.
NEWS
July 20, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of the last extensive interview conducted with John F. Kennedy Jr. It was published in the March issue of Brill's Content magazine.BRILL: In the current issue [of George magazine] you've got [former] President Reagan on the cover. Is that something where you said, "Let's do that?"KENNEDY: What really happens is, we have meetings with the senior staff and in a kind of Socratic method, we vet the ideas. And the ones that stand up under that scrutiny, and the ones [for]
NEWS
August 18, 1998
SINCE HIS election in 1981, Republican Sen. F. Vernon Boozer has been a voice of reason, a leader and a conscientious representative of the 9th Legislative District -- a largely rural area of central Baltimore County. Unfortunately, his moderation has made him the target of Republican ideologues who often influence primary elections.They have an aggressive, intelligent candidate in Andrew P. Harris, a Johns Hopkins anesthesiologist running on a hard-right, social issues platform. Dr. Harris charges that the senator is too liberal, but Mr. Boozer has supported many conservative causes, such as stiff penalties for child pornography and registration of convicted child molesters upon release.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1997
Family issues: Helping employees balance the demands of work and family is a bigger concern for small-business owners than it is for top executives of the nation's largest companies, reports KeyCorp, the banking company. In a recent survey, 58 percent of small business owners said work-family issues were a major part of the culture in their companies. That compares with 28 percent of executives at Fortune 1000 firms in 1995 who said these issues were a major part of their business culture.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1997
Selective execs:Quality of life has become a key issue in job negotiations with executives, reports A. T. Kearney Executive Search.The search firm reports that executives more frequently are asking in job negotiations these days about taking their families on business trips with them, being more selective about the communities into which they will move and seeking more freedom to take three- and four-day weekends.And, Kearney says, 25 percent of executive job candidates decline placement at a corporation because of lack of attention to family issues.
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