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NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
Seven gubernatorial candidates squared off last night on a host of family issues that ranged from welfare reform to spanking school children, but offered few specific remedies.The candidates, both Democrats and Republicans, wrestled with the complex issues of government's role in protecting and providing for children and families, and spurring the state economy with the hope of more and better-paying jobs.The two-hour forum at the University of Maryland Baltimore County was sponsored by the MarylandCommittee for Children Inc., a pri vate, nonprofit advocacy group.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Joanna Conti is withdrawing from the race for Anne Arundel County executive, leaving former sheriff George F. Johnson IV as the only Democrat in the running. Conti said she's dealing with "fairly serious family issues. " "I'm very disappointed to have to do this, but my family comes first. I've worked for four-and-a-half years to try to make a difference in Anne Arundel County and I will continue to do so in a different capacity," Conti said. She did not elaborate on her family issues.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | April 30, 2007
Each Saturday, Ted Sophocleus visits the grave of his middle daughter in Woodlawn, catching her up on the news of the past week, tidying up and leaving flowers for her. The ritual brings scant comfort to Sophocleus, a state delegate from Linthicum still mourning the loss of Dina Sophocleus Furrow, who died in July 2005 when she was pitched head-first from her husband's motorcycle into a guardrail on her 38th birthday. A short drive away, Stanley R. Furrow, 41, is in a cell, sentenced April 20 to a year in the Anne Arundel County jail after being convicted of manslaughter and driving his Harley- Davidson while drunk.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop
The Baltimore Sun
| August 14, 2013
A group of city and state biking enthusiasts has put together a free event set for Saturday, Sept. 21, detailing the ABCs of Baltimore Family Biking  for seasoned riders right down to the newbies, who are curious but concerned about taking their tots on the road.  The two-hour get-together will feature: a show-and-tell by "pedal parents" who will present their gear and answer questions about family bike safety and logistics, ...
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Joanna Conti is withdrawing from the race for Anne Arundel County executive, leaving former sheriff George F. Johnson IV as the only Democrat in the running. Conti said she's dealing with "fairly serious family issues. " "I'm very disappointed to have to do this, but my family comes first. I've worked for four-and-a-half years to try to make a difference in Anne Arundel County and I will continue to do so in a different capacity," Conti said. She did not elaborate on her family issues.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
It's one thing for a company to say it's "family-friendly." It's quite another when a working parent can leave the office at 4:30 p.m. each day to pick up the kids from day care and not worry about career damage.As the American work force becomes more diverse, an increasing number of chief executives are becoming aware that workplace flexibility is essential to recruit and retain talented employees, human resources experts say.About two-thirds of major U.S. corporations have established policies aimed at helping employees balance the demands of work and family life, according to a survey by the non-profit Families and Work Institute in New York.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1997
Family issues: Helping employees balance the demands of work and family is a bigger concern for small-business owners than it is for top executives of the nation's largest companies, reports KeyCorp, the banking company. In a recent survey, 58 percent of small business owners said work-family issues were a major part of the culture in their companies. That compares with 28 percent of executives at Fortune 1000 firms in 1995 who said these issues were a major part of their business culture.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Harford County will launch a new monthly program July 19 offering free car-seat inspections for parents who want to make sure theirs are installed correctly. Other regions, including Baltimore, already offer similar inspections. Roughly three quarters of all Maryland car seats inspected last year were either improperly installed or the wrong size for the children using them, according to Harford County police. It's a frightening figure given that car crashes are the main cause of accidental death and injury for U.S. children.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | January 2, 2007
The lights are always on at Campbell and Co.'s offices in Towson. Across time zones in a dozen countries, its traders are betting on the world's financial markets, millions of dollars at a time. Those transactions have made Keith Campbell a rich man. Now they are helping to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. Since 1998, when he started the Keith Campbell Foundation for the Environment, the 64-year-old investment manager has given away more than $20 million - much of it to fund the bay cleanup.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
Don't drop practical arts requirementThe Maryland Board of Education is proposing changes in the graduation requirements for students which will eliminate the practical arts requirement. Home economics courses dealing with family issues such as parenthood responsibilities, resource management and budgeting, establishing and maintaining healthy family relationships, and establishing nutritious eating habits have been among the choices students have had to fulfill the practical arts requirement.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Harford County will launch a new monthly program July 19 offering free car-seat inspections for parents who want to make sure theirs are installed correctly. Other regions, including Baltimore, already offer similar inspections. Roughly three quarters of all Maryland car seats inspected last year were either improperly installed or the wrong size for the children using them, according to Harford County police. It's a frightening figure given that car crashes are the main cause of accidental death and injury for U.S. children.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop,
The Baltimore Sun
| July 3, 2013
Giving birth in a Kmart parking lot off Belair Road wasn't part of Amber Noll's pregnancy plan, but she said that's what happened after a hospital sent her home Monday morning because she wasn't far enough along.  Noll, who already has two young girls, felt contractions overnight and headed to the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson around 4 a.m. July 1, about a week ahead of her July 9 due date. She said workers there claimed she wasn't dilated enough to be admitted, however.  "They said I shouldn't come back until I couldn't talk through contractions," Noll said.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
In my household, we're in search of the new normal, whatever that is. The past year has been one of transition, upheaval, limbo … but that's coming to an end now, at least we hope so. Last spring, my husband's Marine Corps Reserve unit mobilized to deploy to Afghanistan. Between April and August, he was in and out of training, some in D.C., some in Quantico, nearly a month in California. Then in August, he left for seven months in Afghanistan, leaving me to solo parent our 3-year-old son. In late December, I went on maternity leave and had our second son at the end of the year.
EXPLORE
December 22, 2011
St. Vincent Pallotti Prep President/Principal David McKenzie resigned from his position Dec. 19, just months after assuming the position at the school, according to school officials. Assistant Principal Rick Diggs will become acting principal until a permanent replacement is selected, officials said. McKenzie stepped down due to "pressing family issues," according to a statement released by the school's board of directors. McKenzie, 61, was hired in March to replace Stephen Edmonds, who has been with Pallotti for 36 years and was principal for the last 13 years.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
The dozens of children who spend their after-school hours at the Stanton Community Center in downtown Annapolis can find help with homework, or a game of basketball. They get a bag lunch and assistance from a friendly group of volunteers. But the most dominant presence in this historic city building is the man they call Mr. Lassie. Everybody refers to recreation leader George Belt as Lassie, a childhood nickname that has stuck for all his 60 years. (When he was born the third child in three years, his grandparents told his mother he should be called "Lastie," though she went on to have seven more children.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 8, 2010
Christina Rose Schauble, a freelance news reporter who wrote on legal and family issues, died of cancer April 1 at Frederick Memorial Hospital. The former Highlandtown resident was 58. Born in Baltimore and raised here and in Richmond, Va., she earned a degree in journalism from the University of Maryland, College Park, where she was a reporter for the Diamondback school newspaper. A friend, Rosalia Scalia, recalled her "signature was her long blond hair and her ever-present cigarette."
EXPLORE
December 22, 2011
St. Vincent Pallotti Prep President/Principal David McKenzie resigned from his position Dec. 19, just months after assuming the position at the school, according to school officials. Assistant Principal Rick Diggs will become acting principal until a permanent replacement is selected, officials said. McKenzie stepped down due to "pressing family issues," according to a statement released by the school's board of directors. McKenzie, 61, was hired in March to replace Stephen Edmonds, who has been with Pallotti for 36 years and was principal for the last 13 years.
NEWS
September 2, 2008
Statistically, the most likely profile of a neglectful or abusive parent is a 30-year-old, college-educated white woman who has a job. Yet in Maryland, African-American children are far more likely than their white counterparts to be removed from their homes by child welfare officials because of maltreatment. A recent study by Advocates for Children and Youth, a group that lobbies for children's issues in Maryland, found that while African-Americans make up only a third of the state's children, they constitute nearly three-quarters of the children removed from their homes, and are five times more likely than white children to be placed in group or foster home care.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | April 30, 2007
Each Saturday, Ted Sophocleus visits the grave of his middle daughter in Woodlawn, catching her up on the news of the past week, tidying up and leaving flowers for her. The ritual brings scant comfort to Sophocleus, a state delegate from Linthicum still mourning the loss of Dina Sophocleus Furrow, who died in July 2005 when she was pitched head-first from her husband's motorcycle into a guardrail on her 38th birthday. A short drive away, Stanley R. Furrow, 41, is in a cell, sentenced April 20 to a year in the Anne Arundel County jail after being convicted of manslaughter and driving his Harley- Davidson while drunk.
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