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NEWS
February 17, 2012
After reading your editorial on the achievement gap in Advanced Placement test scores, I was amazed that you focused on family income and wealth as causes of the disparity ("The AP achievement gap," Feb. 14). As one who taught math in both Pikeville and Randallstown high schools, I observed that the biggest differences in students' level of accomplishment were more dependent on their efforts to learn than on their financial status. I think you should put more emphasis on the need for students to focus on their studies rather than on social activities in high school.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
The more money a family in Maryland earns, the more likely their child is to have higher-than-average SAT scores, according to data released by the College Board on Thursday. On average, students living in poverty scored hundreds of points below wealthy students on the national tests used in college admissions, giving them an advantage during the process. "The SAT tells you quite a bit about where you come from, but not very much about where a kid can go," said Robert Schaeffer, public education director of FairTest, a nonprofit that believes the SAT should be optional in the college admissions process.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
The more money a family in Maryland earns, the more likely their child is to have higher-than-average SAT scores, according to data released by the College Board on Thursday. On average, students living in poverty scored hundreds of points below wealthy students on the national tests used in college admissions, giving them an advantage during the process. "The SAT tells you quite a bit about where you come from, but not very much about where a kid can go," said Robert Schaeffer, public education director of FairTest, a nonprofit that believes the SAT should be optional in the college admissions process.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 23, 2013
If you like paint-by-numbers, the data just released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Census create a picture of the United States that is not inspiring. We spend the biggest part of our day - 9 hours and 12 minutes - commuting and working and the other big chunk - 7 hours and 39 minutes - sleeping. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show we spend 6 minutes or less on education and talking to people on the phone. We spend three hours on "leisure," and almost all of that is watching TV. We spend proportionally more on housing now (41 percent of our income)
NEWS
By David Lauter and David Lauter,Los Angeles Times | January 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A large majority of two-earner families with children had to work harder simply to stay in place during the 1980s, according to a new congressional study that documents the widely felt syndrome of "middle-class squeeze."The study illustrates a sharp disparity between those who prospered in the 1980s and those who did not. And it is particularly striking because it looked at the incomes of of families with two wage earners and children -- a group many assumed had fared better during the 1980s than individuals or one-wage-earner families.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
THE URBANOLOGIST David Rusk has confirmed what we've been saying all along: It's the money, stupid.Analyzing the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program for the Abell Foundation, Rusk notes the striking relationship between the pass rate on MSPAP and students' family income.The correlation, Rusk says, is .81. This means 81 percent of the variation in test scores among the 213 elementary schools in Baltimore city and county is "explained" by each school's percentage of low-income children.
BUSINESS
By Craig Stock and Craig Stock,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 8, 1992
The U.S. middle class shrank markedly between 1969 and 1989, as the number of Americans who were rich and poor increased.In 1969, 71.2 percent of Americans were "middle class." Twenty years later, 63.2 percent were middle class, a new Census Bureau study found. The study defined middle class as anyone with income ranging from 50 percent to 199 percent of the national median, or midpoint, income level.High-income individuals -- those with incomes two or more times higher than the median -- increased from 10.9 percent of the population to 14.7 percent.
NEWS
By James Risen and James Risen,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a significant government study of the economic consequences of the Reagan era to be released today, the Federal Reserve Board says the rich got richer while the middle class stagnated during the unprecedented boom of the past decade.The study -- the Fed's first, sweeping attempt to officially study changes in the distribution of wealth during the 1980s -- found that the incomes of affluent Americans rose more quickly throughout the decade than those of middle Americans. The disparity between the wealthiest Americans and the rest of the nation was even more evident in a comparison based on net worth, the Fed found.
NEWS
October 28, 1990
According to the 1980 census, which includes some areas outside the Odenton zip code (latest figures available):Population: 13,27087.5 percent white9.86 percent black1989 median family income, according to county demographer Alexander Speer: $44,1411989 median family income for Anne Arundel County: $44,486Largest employer of Odenton residents: National Security AgencyLargest private employers: Westinghouse, Nevamar Corp.Average single-family home price: $130,000
NEWS
September 25, 2005
At a time when the economic insecurity of middle-class Americans is growing, one bedrock is the soaring values of single-family homes. But for the younger and less affluent, fast-mounting home values are making it more and more difficult to achieve the dream of a home. This challenge can be spotlighted when the average sale price of a single-family home is compared with the median family income. In the Baltimore region five years ago, it generally took two to 2 1/2 times the median family income to purchase a formerly owned single-family home.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 10, 2013
The Pew Research Center reports that mom is the top breadwinner - or the sole breadwinner - in 40 percent of homes with children under 18, and we are talking, again, about how we balance our work and our families. It makes sense. Work and family are the central issues of our lives. It is no wonder that we keep rethinking how to get it right. The Pew report suggests that we are not sure we have. In addition to the facts about who is bringing home the bacon (37 percent are married mothers who have higher incomes than their partners, but 63 percent are single moms)
NEWS
February 17, 2012
After reading your editorial on the achievement gap in Advanced Placement test scores, I was amazed that you focused on family income and wealth as causes of the disparity ("The AP achievement gap," Feb. 14). As one who taught math in both Pikeville and Randallstown high schools, I observed that the biggest differences in students' level of accomplishment were more dependent on their efforts to learn than on their financial status. I think you should put more emphasis on the need for students to focus on their studies rather than on social activities in high school.
NEWS
By David M. Abromowitz | November 17, 2008
During the presidential campaign, the housing debate sometimes had more to do with how many homes a candidate owned than about solutions to the nation's housing crisis. At other times, specious claims were made that the current foreclosure crisis was caused by Fannie Mae, or by policies started in the 1990s to get banks to expand homeownership lending to low- and moderate-income families. We heard very little, unfortunately, about what has succeeded at enabling hardworking families with average or below-average incomes to afford a home or rent a decent apartment.
NEWS
December 31, 2007
Despite some progress, the economic mobility of black Americans is still not comparable to that of whites, according to three recent studies by a scholar at the Brookings Institution. Most disappointing is the financial stagnation that has hit black middle-class families, which raises serious questions about the idea that middle-class status guarantees an even better life for children and future generations. The stagnant, even falling, financial prospects for many blacks is a disturbing trend that will require a number of short- and long-term solutions.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | August 23, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Health officials in Maryland and other states are scrambling to respond to new Bush administration rules that could effectively end subsidized medical insurance for thousands of children. State officials plotted strategy in a conference call yesterday and are reaching out to governors and congressional allies for help. They hope to block new regulations that limit eligibility for the State Children's Health Insurance Program, a Clinton administration-era partnership between state and federal governments that, supporters say, provides a critical safety net for hundreds of thousands of families.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL | April 20, 2006
Although it doesn't include the city, a just-released study seems pertinent to Baltimore. The study, by University of Virginia planning professors William Lucy and David Phillips, compared income and housing values in nearly two dozen cities in the first four years of the decade with their surrounding metropolitan areas. Its findings? "Per capita income and median owner-occupied housing value increased on average in 22 central cities in large metropolitan areas relative to their suburbs between 2000 and 2004, improving on their performance in the 1990s," they wrote in a follow-up to their book Tomorrow's Cities, Tomorrow's Suburbs, which postulates that cities are rebounding while some middle-age suburbs are showing increasing signs of decline.
NEWS
December 31, 2007
Despite some progress, the economic mobility of black Americans is still not comparable to that of whites, according to three recent studies by a scholar at the Brookings Institution. Most disappointing is the financial stagnation that has hit black middle-class families, which raises serious questions about the idea that middle-class status guarantees an even better life for children and future generations. The stagnant, even falling, financial prospects for many blacks is a disturbing trend that will require a number of short- and long-term solutions.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Mollison and Andrew Mollison,Cox News Service | January 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Single-family homes were more affordable in November than at any time in the last 17 1/2 years, a report issued yesterday by the National Association of Realtors says.The trend is expected to continue, because the Federal Reserve Board has acted since then to encourage even lower interest rates.As usual, existing single-family homes were most affordable in the Midwest and South. But the report said that even in the Northeast and West, more families than usual could find affordable homes.
NEWS
September 25, 2005
At a time when the economic insecurity of middle-class Americans is growing, one bedrock is the soaring values of single-family homes. But for the younger and less affluent, fast-mounting home values are making it more and more difficult to achieve the dream of a home. This challenge can be spotlighted when the average sale price of a single-family home is compared with the median family income. In the Baltimore region five years ago, it generally took two to 2 1/2 times the median family income to purchase a formerly owned single-family home.
NEWS
By William A. Galston | June 8, 2004
THE BALTIMORE-BASED Annie E. Casey Foundation recently issued its 15th annual Kids Count Data Book, a respected source of information about the condition of America's young people. The results were bad news - and a challenge - for Maryland. The foundation selected 10 key indicators of child well-being. Between 1996 and 2001, Maryland underperformed the nation on eight of them, including infant mortality and high-school dropout rates. Overall, Maryland received a below-average score, ranking 27th among the 50 states.
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