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By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2011
It was 1985, and Gordon Tomaselli had graduated from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of California at San Francisco. He was at a Boston hospital, interviewing for a possible fellowship, when he got the phone call: His mother had gone into cardiac arrest. Within three weeks, Patricia Tomaselli would have a new heart, and her son would have a new career path. Before that moment, Tomaselli said, he had not been entirely set on a career as a cardiologist.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Terry Stafford grew up in Chatham, Va., before bringing her Southern lifestyle to Abingdon some 28 years ago. Of her dream house, she proudly remarks, "Everybody who comes into this house says it should be in Southern Living magazine. " That was her plan all along when the builder she worked for designed a three-gabled, Colonial-style home for her and husband, Jim Boyd, for which they paid just under $750,000. A licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Premier Realty and the host for 20 years of the WCBM talk radio show "All About Real Estate," Stafford, 64, insisted that her home fit the couple's lifestyle.
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NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 1996
TRACING your family's history can be educational, rewarding, time-consuming and addictive. Just ask Ann Glover.Family genealogy has become a growing passion for the Sykesville resident. Mrs. Glover had always been interested in her family history and admits to being something of a pack rat growing up."I began saving things from my grandmother's attic when I was a child," she said.But with boxes and boxes of family pictures and other memorabilia preserved at her father's Aberdeen home, Mrs. Glover had no idea how to begin organizing the items into something enjoyable to share with family and friends.
NEWS
January 18, 2014
I have 300 years of family history in Central Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania. I lived in New York City for four years. Eileen Pollock is on target - Baltimore is the only large city Maryland has and should not be neglected ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan. 13). I questioned in the 1960s after completing college why jobs were leaving Baltimore and was patronizingly told, "There will be plenty of jobs left, little girl. " A sadness and regret of my older years has been the lack of interest by Marylanders (including politicians)
FEATURES
By Alexis Chiu and Alexis Chiu,BOSTON GLOBE | September 21, 1997
Hunched over a musty book on the top floor of a stately Back Bay building, Bryson Cook was walking backward in time.No Freedom Trail, no Fanueil Hall, no Fenway Park for Cook.The 42-year-old stock brokerage manager from Bedford, N.H., came to Boston not to vacation, but to plumb the city's genealogical records."It's like detective work," said Cook, perched behind an old oak desk in the hushed library of the New England Historic Genealogical Society. "How do you know where you're going if you don't know where you came from?"
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, CHRIS EMERY AND MICHAEL DRESSER and JONATHAN BOR, CHRIS EMERY AND MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTERS | June 23, 2006
Although he provided few details about the depression that drove him out of the governor's race yesterday, Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan mentioned two factors that often converge and trigger the condition - a family history and stress. "One thing that is clear is that vulnerability to depression is a mixture of genetic vulnerability and some kind of stress," said Jennifer Payne, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. "You will almost always find a family history of depression in a patient."
FEATURES
By Peter Landry and Peter Landry,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 6, 1993
Antonia Wilson hasn't seen her childhood home in Pennsylvania in ages, but on days when it rains, she can still picture its sprawling, great cellar."The floor was great big slabs of slate, all smooth," she recalls. "We roller-skated down there. And my grandfather had been an invalid, and there were old wheelchairs. We would push each other all through these rooms."It's the kind of memory that lasts. But in any family -- and Ms. Wilson had a brother, two sisters, and a half sister -- no two people remember things the same way.And sometimes, when older relatives die, all vestiges of their lifestyle pass with them.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1997
Houston Davis Snowden, a Baltimore public school teacher )) for 20 years who traced his family history back 200 years, died Monday of heart failure at Fort Howard Veterans Hospital.Mr. Snowden, 70, of Northwest Baltimore began researching his family ancestry in 1977, interviewing scores of relatives and poring over records and documents in libraries and courthouses in Baltimore and Harper's Ferry, W.Va., where he grew up."He was basically a historian and loved tracing his family's roots," said Paul A. Smith, a former student of Mr. Snowden's at Carver Vocational Technical High School who later became his instructor's close friend.
FEATURES
By Carol Lacey and Carol Lacey,Knight-Ridder | December 18, 1991
Holidays are the time when "branches" and "twigs" from the family tree are most likely to entwine around your living room or dining table.And it's a good bet that once Grandma Geraldine and Uncle Otto sit down with a mug of steaming cider and a plate of cookies, they'll start reminiscing. They'll tell the old stories about how they walked 10 miles to school -- uphill both ways quite likely. Or they'll remember funny little pranks they used to play.Chances are, this is when many youngsters excuse themselves, hurrying off to play Nintendo, call friends or even catch up on overdue homework.
NEWS
By JUDY REILLY | March 4, 1993
Larry Whitaker has at least 500 relatives. They're not the kind you invite for Thanksgiving, mind you, or the ones you want to reach out and touch over the long-distance wires.Yet his relatives, though numerous, are easy to get along with: He initiates all contact with them, they're almost always cooperative, and they never complain.These folks are the relatives on Mr. Whitaker's family tree.Mr. Whitaker is an amateur genealogist who spends weekends and evenings trekking through prior decades in search of his family's roots.
NEWS
By Kevin Leonard | January 3, 2014
It started as idle chatter on the beach. My family was vacationing with old friends we've known since our Laurel High School days in the early 1970s, Richard and Denise Pond. Rich was talking about his father, Clayton Pond, an American Indian and World War II veteran, who died in 1989. His father was typical of many World War II veterans, and reluctant to talk about his military service. He would occasionally drop hints and tidbits that made his children curious, but when pressed for details, he clammed up. At Rich Pond's request and after some digging, I found an amazing story of a small-town hero who was written about in newspapers across the country in the 1940s.
EXPLORE
June 10, 2013
Jarrettsville Lions inducted their newest members, Ellen Scherer and Dave Siemon, flanked by their sponsors Dale Orwig and Al Williamson. Both have a long family history with the Lions clubs; Ellen wears a broach symbolizing her grandmother's membership in Lions.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
William Waters Kirk IV, a Baltimore native and former headmaster of the Calvert School, died June 18 of Parkinson's disease. He was 91. "He took justifiable pride in the influential role he played in the development of thousands of young people," his son-in-law Jack Anderson wrote in an email. "His generation is often referred to as 'The Greatest,' and I would hold William Kirk up as an example of why it has been so recognized. " Mr. Kirk was reared by a widowed mother in the Walbrook neighborhood in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
No one could predict in 1940 that World War II was destined to become the deadliest conflict in history, so they couldn't foresee how important the data in the 1940 census might become one day. Information about the lives of U.S. citizens, including those who died in World War II, has been locked away for more than seven decades and is about to be unveiled. And the Howard County Genealogical Society is ready to help people access it. The nation was emerging from the Depression in 1940, the same year that President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | August 12, 2011
Upon entering the G. Krug & Son blacksmith shop, I was handed a pair of safety goggles and immediately knew I was in for a treat. All around me were the goings-on of a bygone era. Peter Krug, owner of the Baltimore workshop that has been in business since the early 19th century, crafts steel scrollwork by hand, the old-fashioned way: hammer and anvil shaping red-hot metal heated in a 2,500-degree forge. You don't know hot until you've stood in front of that forge on a summer day in a building that has no air conditioning.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
A century ago, the Page family settled in Catonsville, founded a church and operated the neighborhood grocery out of the front rooms of a home on Winters Lane. Still, the family's 99-year-old matriarch, Eva Page Brooks - whose living room was once that family store - could not trace its history back more than a few generations. But thanks to the Internet and a DNA sample, the Catonsville clan has become the first black family - and the first Baltimoreans - to verify their descent from two 17th- and 18th-century settlers of Virginia and become members of a group dedicated to their legacy, the Page-Nelson Society.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
No one could predict in 1940 that World War II was destined to become the deadliest conflict in history, so they couldn't foresee how important the data in the 1940 census might become one day. Information about the lives of U.S. citizens, including those who died in World War II, has been locked away for more than seven decades and is about to be unveiled. And the Howard County Genealogical Society is ready to help people access it. The nation was emerging from the Depression in 1940, the same year that President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office.
NEWS
By Tony Pugh and Tony Pugh,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 12, 2004
Top U.S. health officials are asking families to use their Thanksgiving gatherings to discuss and record the medical histories of their parents, grandparents and other kin. Health researchers have known for years that family medical history is a strong indicator for many chronic diseases, including diabetes, stroke, obesity, cancer and heart disease. "In fact, family history is the most consistent risk factor for almost all human diseases across [one's] life span," said Muin Khoury, the director of the Office of Genomics and Disease Prevention at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | July 27, 2011
If the recent TV program “Who Do You Think You Are?” piques your interest into researching your ancestry, you're not alone. The Family History Center in Ellicott City has seen an increase in the number of people doing just that - helping more than 36 visitors each week. Wanda Franklin, director of the center, shared that there's also an increase in the number of people studying genealogy at Howard Community College, through classes taught by the center's staff. “Doing family history research is like working on a jigsaw puzzle.
LIFESTYLE
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2011
It was 1985, and Gordon Tomaselli had graduated from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of California at San Francisco. He was at a Boston hospital, interviewing for a possible fellowship, when he got the phone call: His mother had gone into cardiac arrest. Within three weeks, Patricia Tomaselli would have a new heart, and her son would have a new career path. Before that moment, Tomaselli said, he had not been entirely set on a career as a cardiologist.
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