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NEWS
November 20, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley joins a long list of political and agricultural leaders across the state who have voiced concern over the University of Maryland Environmental Law Clinic and the Waterkeeper Alliance's litigation against Alan and Kristin Hudson of Berlin who raise chickens on their Worcester County farm ("O'Malley criticizes UMB for lawsuit," Nov. 18). The governor is correct in pointing out this unfair attack on a family farm represents an "ongoing injustice" and that the environmental law clinic and the Waterkeepers are pursuing "costly litigation of questionable merit.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
On an unseasonably warm opening weekend, several visitors exited the 7-acre corn maze at Sharp's at Waterford Farm huffing and puffing, and a tad overheated. The 8-foot-tall withered cornstalks that wall in the maze's twisting pathway were the likely culprit, blocking breezes that could have offset the afternoon sun, surmised farm manager Cheryl Nodar. "The people who walk through on our first weekend are always the guinea pigs," she said. "I ask them how it went to be sure it's a good experience, and we're getting great feedback so far. " The corn maze, which debuted in 2002, is an agritourism feature that has helped attract thousands of visitors over the years to the working Glenwood farm, which dates to 1903.
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NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | May 1, 1994
When Jim Fielder was leaving his job as Harford County economic development director last month, he decided to phone a few friends and associates and let them know.Right after he'd completed the pre-dawn milking chores on his father's Creswell dairy farm.Whether milking the family herd or pitching a Fortune 500 company on locating in Harford County, the days have been long -- but rewarding -- since he took the county position three years ago.His new position of assistant secretary for business development in state government in Annapolis won't cut back on his hours, either; it's just going to be a longer daily commute.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Eugene Nickens, a retired longshoreman and an outdoorsman, died Friday of kidney failure at the Joseph Richey House hospice in Baltimore. He was 87. The son of Eugene Nickens, who worked in a dry-cleaning establishment, and Annie Nickens, a housekeeper, Eugene Nickens was born in Baltimore. When he was 11, he moved with his family to the historic African-American community of Pumphrey in Anne Arundel County, where they settled on a chicken farm. Mr. Nickens attended Wiley H. Bates High School in Annapolis until the 11th grade, when he left after the death of his father to help operate the family farm.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | February 18, 2007
If the state Senate confirms his appointment tomorrow, Maryland's new agriculture secretary will bring to the job the experience of running a family farm that traces its roots back before the Revolutionary War. "I've been a lifelong farmer; my father, my grandfather and my great-grandfather were farmers," Roger L. Richardson said in one of his first interviews since Gov. Martin O'Malley named him to the post. "We still farm the 60 acres that came into our family in 1767." It is his knowledge and understanding of agriculture, stemming from such a long tradition, along with a love of farming, that the 72-year-old Richardson lists as the major attributes he brings to his new job. His aim, he said, "is to continue the successful initiatives" of his predecessor, Lewis R. Riley, who served as agriculture secretary under three governors before resigning this month.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
Tomorrow night, Howard County Councilman Charles C. Feaga will do something he says he should have done a month ago -- get up from his council seat, publicly acknowledge a conflict of interest and let his colleagues debate a touchy issue without him.Had he done that at the council's first hearing on a proposal to ease growth restrictions and allow hundreds of new homes in Ellicott City, the proposal might have been quietly approved by now.And Feaga would...
NEWS
By GERALD P. MERRELL and GERALD P. MERRELL,SUN REPORTER | April 26, 2006
Randy Nixon was rehearsing for a school play, but Thanksgiving at the family farm was also on his mind - heightened by a forecast of snow. So he didn't think much of it when his mother arrived early Nov. 22, 1972, to pick him up from Park School. She pulled him aside and broke the news: His father had been shot to death outside his North Bond Street store in Baltimore during a robbery attempt. While Randy Nixon coped with his father's death, his mother struggled to keep the family afloat.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
In an article in the Jan. 15 Carroll County edition of The Sun, John D. Myers, a former county school board member, related an incident in which a longtime friend once said that Mr. Myers would "rot in hell" after a school board vote. The story may have implied that Melvin Arbaugh, a Westminster architect who was mentioned in the next paragraph, was the person who made the statemen. He was not.The Sun regrets the error.The bright yellow letters on a green banner hanging on the wall in the county school board meeting room are words right out of the mouth of outgoing member and president John D. Myers Jr."
NEWS
June 19, 1997
CHARLES C. FEAGA may want to become Howard County executive but he seems more driven to sell his family's West Friendship farm. The Republican county councilman, who already has announced his bid to run for Howard's top elected position, again has pushed the boundary of ethical behavior in a matter involving his property.Mr. Feaga's recent failure to disclose that his property would benefit from a proposed change under the county's growth control law is a sure way to lose the confidence of Howard County voters who have viewed him as the quintessential citizen-legislator.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 19, 2008
John Streett "Jack" Davis, founder and developer of Harford County's first public golf course, died of cancer Feb. 11 at his home in Street. He was 81. Mr. Davis was born and lived his entire life at Geneva Farm, his family's Harford County dairy and later truck farm. He was a descendant of Col. John Streett, who led the Harford Militia against the British at the Battle of North Point during the War of 1812. "He never lived anywhere else," said his daughter, Kelly Louise Davis of Street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Myles R. McComas, a World War II veteran who was the founder and president of Carpet Land, died Friday of complications from a stroke at Manor Care Ruxton. He was 94. The son of Ross McComas and Florence McComas, Myles Ross McComas was born and raised on the family farm in Hampstead. "His formal education ended in the seventh grade at the Fifth District School. It was the Great Depression, and he had to go to work on the family farm," said his son, Michael C. McComas of Hereford.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Alexander M. "Marty" Todd Jr., a retired Eastern Shore vegetable farmer who was an 11th-generation member of the family that settled a farm that is now Todd's Inheritance Historic Site in North Point, died Sunday of respiratory failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 92. "He'd call me when I was in the Baltimore County Office of Planning and would regale me with stories. He was one of the last private owners of the Todd Mansion on North Point Road," said John W. McGrain Jr., a Towson writer and former secretary of the Baltimore County Landmarks Preservation Commission.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Elizabeth H. Breidenbaugh, who with her husband owned and operated a Baltimore County dairy farm for nearly 50 years, died Monday of a heart attack at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 81. The daughter of a farmer and a schoolteacher, Elizabeth Bennett Harlan was born in Baltimore and raised at her family's Belvedere Farm in Fallston, where she helped her father regularly milk his registered Jersey cows. Beginning early in her life, she demonstrated a lifelong interest in raising and showing Jersey cows, so much so that she was given the nickname of "Jersey.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 10, 2013
Pauline Duncan Carico was born on July 8, 1913. She was the middle child of Robert and Hannah Dunlap Duncan. There was an older brother, Everett, and a younger brother, Roy, who are deceased. A party to celebrate her 100th birthday was held in her honor recently at Pond View Farm. She arrived in a horse drawn carriage where she was greeted by more than 200 of her family and friends. "Aunt Polly," as she is known to many, attended a two-room school called Carea and later graduated from Jarrettsville High School in 1931.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Bowie Community Theatre has struck comic gold this month with playwright Del Shores' in 'Daddy's Dyin' Who's Got the Will?" The play was Shores' first hit play, premiering in 1987. In this edition, BCT President John Nunemaker directs with assurance and affection for this family of misfits - in some ways repeating Bowie's earlier triumph with "Sordid Lives," another warm-hearted dark comedy that enlivened the company's 2011-2012 season. "Daddy's Dyin'" takes place in 1986, in the small Texas town of Lowake, where four siblings gather at the family farm after learning of the dire condition of their father, Buford, who has suffered a stroke after already suffering from advanced dementia.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
More than 200 years into the life of their family farm, Tim and Mitzi Jones decided their future should include cheese.  Bowling Green Farm has been producing milk from about 100 Holsteins and has been in the milk business since the 1920s. A few years ago, however, they realized milk wasn't enough. "There is no money in milk at this point," says Mitzi Jones, whose husband's family has owned the farm since the late 1700s. Sitting on 400 acres in the Sykesville area, Bowling Green Farm is one of three dairy farms still in business in Howard County, compared with about 300 in the 1960s, according to the county's economic development agency.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 1996
This was always his home, even if Christopher Tilghman mostly lived elsewhere. He passed many summers as a youth here on this sprawling family farm with its magnificent views of the Chester River and its history nearly as old as the state of Maryland. He teaches his three boys to revel in its thousand acres.It's a wonderful place for a kid, and on this warm, late-winter day, with an explosion of buds promising spring and dark clouds suggesting an afternoon storm coming off the Chesapeake Bay, the three Tilghman boys -- ages 12, 10 and 3 -- are busy exploring.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2000
When the Stanfield brothers decided to peel off 100 acres of their farm for housing, they wanted to guarantee that the new neighborhood would meet their standards. So the two farmers developed the land themselves, hired an engineer, scouted for a builder, and brought in people to build the roads and wells. Typically, farmers sell their land to developers and walk away. But Richard R. Stanfield, 65, and Edward F. Stanfield, 68, are not typical farmers. In nearly a half-century on their 600-acre Edrich Farms, which straddles Randallstown, Woodstock and Granite in western Baltimore County, the Stanfield brothers have done a good deal more than raise cattle and grow corn.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
The plaintiffs in a high-profile land dispute with Johns Hopkins University filed for summary judgment in their case against the university on Tuesday, one day after JHU filed a similar motion. The lawsuit was originally filed in November by family members of Elizabeth Beall Newell, who along with her siblings sold 108 acres of their family's Belward Farm near Gaithersburg to JHU in 1989 for $5 million. The sale, of land the family said was valued at $54 million, came with certain stipulations, including that the land be used for research or education purposes.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
On a recent Sunday afternoon, Polly Pittman clipped nets over the ripening grapes in the vineyard she hopes will ensure that one of Anne Arundel County's oldest family farms continues to have a future. "Basically, the McMansions start on the other side of these trees," Pittman said. "We think of ourselves as the last frontier of agricultural development in Anne Arundel County. " Nearly three centuries after her ancestors started tilling this hill in Davidsonville, the 550-acre Dodon Farm remains the county's largest working family farm.
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