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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Eight people hung posters on the Anne Arundel County Circuit Courthouse fence yesterday and gathered signatures on a petition calling for passage of a law that would set up a Family Division within circuit courts to handle divorces and child custody disputes.Such issues are handled as part of Maryland's regular Circuit Court caseload.In three hours yesterday morning, the demonstrators gathered about 150 signatures on petitions asking the state House Judiciary and the Senate Judicial Proceedings committees to approve bills to set up a Family Division.
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NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2002
Baltimore Circuit Judge Kathleen O'Ferrall Friedman, who brought a social work bent to her judicial duties in becoming one of Maryland's most effective advocates for children and families, retired from the bench yesterday. During her 16 years as a judge, Friedman set case law and helped create Baltimore's pioneering Family Court - a Circuit Court division designed to handle heavy caseloads that demand a light touch. "She broke ground," said Circuit Court Administrative Judge Ellen M. Heller.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1998
The state's highest court approved yesterday judicial rules to formalize the creation of family divisions for Maryland's five largest circuit courts.The family divisions will consolidate domestic matters such as divorce, custody, paternity, child support, name changes, involuntary commitments to state hospitals and the withholding of medical care.Many courts in the state have moved toward creating family divisions to better manage swollen caseloads. Family issues account for at least half of all civil case filings in the state.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
His longtime position at the helm of the court's family division gone, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. will retire from the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Oct. 30. Cawood, 65, said he is stepping down after nearly two decades on the bench because he is unhappy with changes in the court that have taken family cases from him and that have set time limits for moving cases through the legal system. Cawood has handled cases of family discord -- seen by many judges as the worst cases because they tend to be emotional and take a great deal of time -- almost exclusively for most of his tenure on the bench.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
These are the walls that lead to the rooms where your parents get divorced, where they fight over who should pay for your food, where they figure out who your real father is. At best, the family division of Baltimore Circuit Court is no fun for children. At worst, it's terrifying. Yesterday evening, though, the elementary school pupils, who crowded into the family division waiting area, were giggling and beaming as judges officially unveiled an exhibit of their work. Now, as children and their parents walk past the formerly stark white walls leading to the courtrooms, they will pass 32 framed pictures in crayon, watercolor, sparkly paper and feathers.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
His longtime position at the helm of the court's family division gone, Judge James C. Cawood Jr. will retire from the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Oct. 30. Cawood, 65, said he is stepping down after nearly two decades on the bench because he is unhappy with changes in the court that have taken family cases from him and that have set time limits for moving cases through the legal system. Cawood has handled cases of family discord -- seen by many judges as the worst cases because they tend to be emotional and take a great deal of time -- almost exclusively for most of his tenure on the bench.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2000
With the opening of four new courtrooms devoted to processing family conflict cases, navigating the legal system just became easier for Baltimore families. "Litigants get lost as they are shuffled from the medical services offices on one floor to the courtroom to the assignment office," said Baltimore City Circuit Judge Albert J. Matricciani Jr. "Once we finish building this out, 99 percent of our services will be within arm's reach," Matricciani said. "That means a quicker resolution of more family disputes ... and a more user-friendly system for people who are often unrepresented."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
Maryland's highest court is poised to create a family division in the state's five largest circuit courts to consolidate everything from child-support to life-support matters.Proponents, including Chief Judge Robert M. Bell of the Court of Appeals, say a family division is needed to efficiently manage the TC family cases, which have swelled to half the civil cases on any given circuit court docket, and to get appropriate services for the families.Because the emotionally explosive cases often sprawl across juvenile and adult courts, coordination is difficult.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
The creation of a family court in Maryland to hear cases ranging from divorces to juvenile delinquency was widely endorsed yesterday as a way to better handle increasingly complex social issues.But many state judges -- including Chief Judge Robert C. Murphy -- were either opposed or cool to the Schaefer administration's measure as burdensome to the courts.And a key lawmaker dismissed it as unnecessary, saying the Circuit Court has the power to create a family division."There isn't any question that a family court is needed now. . . . It's highly specialized," said Gov. William Donald Schaefer, unveiling the legislation at a morning news conference.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2002
Baltimore Circuit Judge Kathleen O'Ferrall Friedman, who brought a social work bent to her judicial duties in becoming one of Maryland's most effective advocates for children and families, retired from the bench yesterday. During her 16 years as a judge, Friedman set case law and helped create Baltimore's pioneering Family Court - a Circuit Court division designed to handle heavy caseloads that demand a light touch. "She broke ground," said Circuit Court Administrative Judge Ellen M. Heller.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
These are the walls that lead to the rooms where your parents get divorced, where they fight over who should pay for your food, where they figure out who your real father is. At best, the family division of Baltimore Circuit Court is no fun for children. At worst, it's terrifying. Yesterday evening, though, the elementary school pupils, who crowded into the family division waiting area, were giggling and beaming as judges officially unveiled an exhibit of their work. Now, as children and their parents walk past the formerly stark white walls leading to the courtrooms, they will pass 32 framed pictures in crayon, watercolor, sparkly paper and feathers.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 7, 2001
In Baltimore City Authorities arrest man sought in 3 Waverly killings A Baltimore County man being sought in last month's triple fatal shooting in Waverly was arrested yesterday afternoon in a house less than a mile from the slaying scene. Otis Edwards III, 25, of the first block of Dowling Circle in Hillendale was arrested about 3:30 p.m. in the 1800 block of E. 28th St. by members of the Police Department's Warrant Apprehension Task Force and agents with the U.S. marshal's office. Edwards was charged with three counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Tony Blizzard Jr., 18, Jamal Fisher, 18, and Donte Weddington, 25, who were shot while sitting in a car Feb. 24 at East 29th and Mathews streets.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2000
With the opening of four new courtrooms devoted to processing family conflict cases, navigating the legal system just became easier for Baltimore families. "Litigants get lost as they are shuffled from the medical services offices on one floor to the courtroom to the assignment office," said Baltimore City Circuit Judge Albert J. Matricciani Jr. "Once we finish building this out, 99 percent of our services will be within arm's reach," Matricciani said. "That means a quicker resolution of more family disputes ... and a more user-friendly system for people who are often unrepresented."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1998
The state's highest court approved yesterday judicial rules to formalize the creation of family divisions for Maryland's five largest circuit courts.The family divisions will consolidate domestic matters such as divorce, custody, paternity, child support, name changes, involuntary commitments to state hospitals and the withholding of medical care.Many courts in the state have moved toward creating family divisions to better manage swollen caseloads. Family issues account for at least half of all civil case filings in the state.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
Maryland's highest court is poised to create a family division in the state's five largest circuit courts to consolidate everything from child-support to life-support matters.Proponents, including Chief Judge Robert M. Bell of the Court of Appeals, say a family division is needed to efficiently manage the TC family cases, which have swelled to half the civil cases on any given circuit court docket, and to get appropriate services for the families.Because the emotionally explosive cases often sprawl across juvenile and adult courts, coordination is difficult.
NEWS
April 3, 1996
IF THE AMERICAN family were in healthier shape -- fewer divorces, fewer custody cases to resolve, fewer child support payments to collect, fewer children in need of foster care or adoption -- Maryland's current judicial structure might not prove such a heavy burden on so many of its citizens.But the fact is that 50 percent of many court dockets in Maryland involve domestic cases and, all too often, the families have to stand in a long line for judicial attention -- thus stringing out what is already a painfully extended and confusing crisis.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 7, 2001
In Baltimore City Authorities arrest man sought in 3 Waverly killings A Baltimore County man being sought in last month's triple fatal shooting in Waverly was arrested yesterday afternoon in a house less than a mile from the slaying scene. Otis Edwards III, 25, of the first block of Dowling Circle in Hillendale was arrested about 3:30 p.m. in the 1800 block of E. 28th St. by members of the Police Department's Warrant Apprehension Task Force and agents with the U.S. marshal's office. Edwards was charged with three counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Tony Blizzard Jr., 18, Jamal Fisher, 18, and Donte Weddington, 25, who were shot while sitting in a car Feb. 24 at East 29th and Mathews streets.
NEWS
April 3, 1996
IF THE AMERICAN family were in healthier shape -- fewer divorces, fewer custody cases to resolve, fewer child support payments to collect, fewer children in need of foster care or adoption -- Maryland's current judicial structure might not prove such a heavy burden on so many of its citizens.But the fact is that 50 percent of many court dockets in Maryland involve domestic cases and, all too often, the families have to stand in a long line for judicial attention -- thus stringing out what is already a painfully extended and confusing crisis.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | April 2, 1995
There may have been a time when lawmakers could look at the price tag on a piece of legislation and yawn. If so, it's ancient history now. With citizens demanding effective government at an efficient cost, the fiscal note can make or break a bill.For several years, the price tag has helped stall attempts in the General Assembly to create a family division within the state's circuit courts. Legislators would take one look at the inflated fiscal note, and everyone knew the legislation was doomed -- despite evidence that a family court would vastly improve the effectiveness of Maryland's judiciary in dealing with domestic matters.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Eight people hung posters on the Anne Arundel County Circuit Courthouse fence yesterday and gathered signatures on a petition calling for passage of a law that would set up a Family Division within circuit courts to handle divorces and child custody disputes.Such issues are handled as part of Maryland's regular Circuit Court caseload.In three hours yesterday morning, the demonstrators gathered about 150 signatures on petitions asking the state House Judiciary and the Senate Judicial Proceedings committees to approve bills to set up a Family Division.
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