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NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
Republican gubernatorial candidate Helen Delich Bentley said yesterday that she would cut off welfare benefits to recipients convicted of a felony or any crime involving illicit drugs.Unveiling a welfare reform plan six days before the primary election, Mrs. Bentley also would deny increased benefits to mothers who have additional children while on the welfare rolls and would require recipients to go to work after receiving cash benefits for two years.Both those elements are similar to proposals pushed by Democratic Gov. William Donald Schaefer, to whom Mrs. Bentley gave credit, and previously espoused by her closest GOP rival, state Del. Ellen R. Sauerbrey.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Ending months of intense debate within the administration, President Clinton will propose making it easier for states to deny additional benefits to women who have children while already on welfare, senior administration officials say.The decision aligns Mr. Clinton with those inside and outside the administration who argue that government must intensify its efforts to discourage out-of-wedlock births, which now constitute roughly 30 percent...
NEWS
May 4, 1994
Gov. William Donald Schaefer did the right thing by signing a bill permitting Baltimore City to experiment with a needle-exchange program in an attempt to combat the AIDS epidemic. Although the governor does not personally approve of free needle exchanges, he had the courage to recognize the AIDS situation demands some unusual responses."It is so easy to say no, stay the same, don't take any chances, not be progressive," Mr. Schaefer said at this week's bill-signing session in Annapolis. That is not the Schaefer way, though.
NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN | May 1, 1994
Carolyn Colvin, Maryland's Human Resources secretary, once expressed the hope that the state's attempt at welfare reform would blaze a trail for the Clinton administration.In hindsight, that now seems overwhelmingly ambitious for a plan that was largely a pastiche of proposals already tried, or about to be tried, in other states.The family cap? New Jersey gets to take credit for that innovation, which freezes benefits when welfare recipients have more children. (Early results are promising, but incomplete.
NEWS
May 1, 1994
Welfare reform was high on Gov. William Donald Schaefer's list of priorities this year. But the welfare reform bill that passed the General Assembly is sitting on his desk, facing a possible veto because it does not contain a "family cap," a provision that would deny an increase in benefits to a woman who has an additional child after being placed on the welfare rolls.The cap appeals to fairness, but the governor's attachment to it is somewhat puzzling. He asserts that it would save money, but that is a dubious proposition since it would affect only a minority of women on welfare.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | April 19, 1994
Eighty dollars a month is barely enough to keep a child in diapers. It certainly is not enough to give a woman an economic incentive to have babies.Eighty dollars is what Maryland adds to a welfare recipient's check for each additional child. Maryland's generosity is about average -- many states pay a mother more. Many pay a whole lot less.But Gov. William Donald Schaefer apparently believes $80 seduces women into having children and he has vowed to remove this profit motive from the welfare system by any means necessary.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1994
Gov. William Donald Schaefer vowed yesterday to continue trying to impose a so-called "family cap" on Marylanders who receive welfare payments -- despite the measure's defeat in the waning hours of the legislative session Monday night.The governor, weary after watching some of his bigger initiatives weakened or killed on the final day of the General Assembly, also said he might veto the welfare reform bill that lawmakers did approve.Welfare reform was a key piece of the governor's agenda.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Marina Sarris and John W. Frece and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers Frank Langfitt, John A. Morris and Robert Timberg contributed to this article | April 12, 1994
Maryland lawmakers, cautious throughout this election-year session, played it safe to the end last night, passing a bill to get tougher on violent criminals but killing or watering down virtually every other important measure that might offend one interest group or another.Showing no mercy for Gov. William Donald Schaefer in his final legislative session, the lawmakers killed three of his major proposals: bills to regulate gambling, to raise the tax on cigarettes and to speed up the death penalty appeals process.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1994
At midnight the 1994 session of the Maryland General Assembly will be history, and so will efforts to reform welfare, speed up death penalty appeals and raise cigarette taxes if lawmakers don't hurry.They must strike a compromise on those issues today or their work on them during the last 89 days will amount to nothing.The only certainty on the final day of a legislative session is uncertainty. Any bill awaiting action is vulnerable to a last-minute power play, a Senate filibuster, pressure from lobbyists or just plain lack of time.
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