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NEWS
February 14, 1994
No one likes the welfare system, least of all those who depend on it. But float a proposal for reform and, just as surely, objections will abound. A good example is the controversial "family cap," one of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's reforms now pending before the General Assembly. It would halt automatic increases in welfare payments if a recipient has an additional child.Advocates for the poor strongly object. They note that 77 percent of welfare recipients have only one or two children and that there is no sound evidence such caps influence childbearing.
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NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 2004
MIAMI - Tough new restrictions imposed by the Bush administration on travel and remittances to Cuba go into effect today, with Cuban-Americans sharply divided over whom the crackdown would hurt more - Fidel Castro or their own loved ones on the island. "This is a very humanitarian but responsible measure to speed up the transition to democracy in Cuba and protect our national interests against terrorism," said Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, a Florida Republican. "What the president did is cut off money to an anti-American terrorist regime."
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NEWS
By CAROLYN W. COLVIN | February 20, 1994
Recently Connie Tolbert, a former welfare mother, recalled the day in 1990 when she first paid for groceries with her paycheck instead of food stamps. Ms. Tolbert had been off and on welfare for eight years. Unaccustomed to budgeting, she was suddenly stricken with fear that she wouldn't have enough money to feed her four kids and pay the rent.But those anxious moments in the supermarket checkout lasted only a few minutes. She presented her groceries and paid the bill. And she still had money in the bank.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The first state in the nation to end the practice of increasing a welfare check when a recipient has another baby conceded yesterday that the policy has failed to reduce birthrates.The Rutgers University study leading to that conclusion, commissioned by the state of New Jersey, could deal a blow to the 20 other states that since have adopted "family caps." And it poses a challenge to conservatives who argued that a federally required cap is necessary for welfare reform to succeed nationally.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Marina Sarris and Laura Lippman and Marina Sarris,Staff Writers | January 27, 1994
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has proposed to make Maryland one of the toughest states in the nation in its willingness to limit benefits to welfare mothers.The centerpiece of his reform package, submitted this week to the General Assembly, is a controversial and relatively untested proposal not to increase payments when a welfare recipient has an additional child.The so-called "family cap," once vehemently opposed by Mr. Schaefer, is now used only in New Jersey.Another Schaefer proposal is a variation on "time-limited" welfare -- the approach favored by President Clinton Tuesday night -- in which benefits would end altogether for recipients who refuse to look for a job or do community service.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt Sun staff writers John A. Morris and Robert Timberg contributed to this article. and Frank Langfitt Sun staff writers John A. Morris and Robert Timberg contributed to this article.,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer vowed today to continue trying to institute a so-called "family cap" on Marylanders who receive welfare payments -- despite a General Assembly that in its final hours last night killed the measure.The governor, obviously tired from a legislative session that treated administration proposals roughly, also said he might veto the welfare-reform bill that Assembly members did pass.The welfare reform legislation was a key piece of administration agenda, and the resulting bill was a sharp reduction of what the governor had sought.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Ending months of intense debate within the administration, President Clinton will propose making it easier for states to deny additional benefits to women who have children while already on welfare, senior administration officials say.The decision aligns Mr. Clinton with those inside and outside the administration who argue that government must intensify its efforts to discourage out-of-wedlock births, which now constitute roughly 30 percent...
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1994
A Schaefer administration measure that would deny increased payments to welfare mothers who have additional children cleared its first major legislative hurdle yesterday.By an 8-2 vote, with one abstention, the Senate Finance Committee passed the administration's key welfare proposal virtually intact, including the controversial family cap provision.In addition to the cap, which applies statewide, the bill would require some recipients to participate in an experimental program in which they could lose welfare payments if they don't get a job or perform community service work after 18 months on the rolls.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The first state in the nation to end the practice of increasing a welfare check when a recipient has another baby conceded yesterday that the policy has failed to reduce birthrates.The Rutgers University study leading to that conclusion, commissioned by the state of New Jersey, could deal a blow to the 20 other states that since have adopted "family caps." And it poses a challenge to conservatives who argued that a federally required cap is necessary for welfare reform to succeed nationally.
NEWS
July 9, 1995
Welfare reform is no issue for anyone lacking patience. It took decades to build up the system that now exists, and it won't be reformed overnight. Sad to say, there are no magic bullets to spur the process.So it comes as no surprise that a study of New Jersey's pioneering use of the "family cap" found that refusing to increase payments to mothers who have another child while on welfare has no significant effect on birthrates among women on welfare.The new study crushes the hopes of those who looked to a prior report suggesting that the family cap could dramatically lower birthrates among women on welfare.
NEWS
February 13, 1996
WHATEVER THE merits of Governor Parris N. Glendening's new welfare reform proposals, they are based on a questionable assumption. For months, it has been conventional wisdom that the federal government would pass welfare reform legislation. States everywhere expected something before now, even if the changes were less than sweeping.So far, nothing. Just as it proved on health care legislation, the federal government is showing again that it is capable of reaching gridlock no matter how high the expectations or fierce the desire for change.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- There are several pointed political messages in the defection of 20 Republican senators against the so-called family cap on welfare.The most important is that there are still some Republicans unwilling to go to any length either to make an ideological point or to punish the liberals and their constituencies.There is also a clear warning to Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole that he is taking a serious political risk as a presidential candidate if he continues kowtowing to the extremism of his rival from the far right, Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a double-barreled defeat for conservative Republicans, the Senate voted yesterday to scuttle a proposal to deny additional cash benefits for welfare recipients who have more babies and rejected an amendment to deny cash to unwed teen mothers.The provisions sparked intense debate as the Senate moved toward final passage of welfare reform.The legislation, which Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas said would likely go to a final vote today, would engineer the most extensive welfare changes in six decades.
NEWS
July 9, 1995
Welfare reform is no issue for anyone lacking patience. It took decades to build up the system that now exists, and it won't be reformed overnight. Sad to say, there are no magic bullets to spur the process.So it comes as no surprise that a study of New Jersey's pioneering use of the "family cap" found that refusing to increase payments to mothers who have another child while on welfare has no significant effect on birthrates among women on welfare.The new study crushes the hopes of those who looked to a prior report suggesting that the family cap could dramatically lower birthrates among women on welfare.
NEWS
July 2, 1995
It's a simple idea that's had a sweeping impact on welfare reform: Remove the financial incentive and welfare mothers won't have more children.It began in 1992 when New Jersey enacted a "family cap" law barring additional payments to welfare mothers who have children 10 or more months after they apply for welfare.Based on reports of the law's success, several states -- including Maryland -- implemented similar laws. The family cap also became an important part of the congressional push for welfare reform.
NEWS
March 30, 1995
One problem with welfare reform is the tone of the debate. "Do as I say, not as I do," shout the politicians and angry voters -- plenty of whom are no longer married to the mothers or fathers of their own children and who seem as lacking in family values as some of the welfare mothers they preach to. Real welfare reform will come only when this country acknowledges the obvious: There will always be families who need a safety net. "Curing" the joblessness and...
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening joined state legislative leaders yesterday to support a pilot welfare reform program that they said would help move people from dependence to work and keep poor families together.The program, which is pending before the General Assembly, would require some parents to find a job, perform community service or enroll in a job training and placement program within three months of going on the welfare rolls.To encourage families to stay together, the program would also allow households to continue to receive welfare payments even if the father worked more than 100 hours in one month.
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