Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFamily Business
IN THE NEWS

Family Business

FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | June 12, 1991
LIKE HIS FATHER before him, and his father before him and his father before him, Mickey Haas, 26, wants the clothes to fit the man. After majoring in radio and television at the University of Arizona, there was little question that he would join the family business, Haas Tailoring Co. in Baltimore."
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 14, 2008
Since the early 1960s, Mrs. Pose has been, arguably, Baltimore's most famous dessert baker. The signature cheesecake she began selling in 1962 remains a staple of local restaurants, country clubs and delis. She says it has "the texture of ice cream." Her name is Lois Gibbons (she was once really Mrs. Posey) and lives in Sebring, Fla., while spending the summer and Christmas at her daughter's Lutherville home. She plays golf three times a week and only stopped cleaning her own house when her right leg developed a meniscus tear.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
Stephen J. Glick was a man who wasn't happy until he knew exactly how things worked.This obsession made him an expert on every obscure regulation in golf, prevented him from having fun with a pocket computer until he'd figured out all of its functions and led him to the top at Rose Shanis, the personal loan business his mother founded in 1932."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Recession being the bane of piano retailers, it seems wholly remarkable that Harry Cohen and his son, Lou, decided to start selling Baldwins and Wurlitzers in 1937 - the year the economy relapsed toward the end of the Great Depression. But somehow the Cohens survived the recession of 1937 and 1938. In fact, the family business, founded in Philadelphia, thrived through three generations and extended into three states. Hundreds of families in Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland bought new and used pianos from one of the Cohens over the years.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Officials with Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's administration say they won't immediately seek to recoup a $300,000 taxpayer-funded loan granted to a Pikesville family business that was raided this week in a federal cigarette-smuggling case. Health-Way Pharmacy was allegedly used to aid a black-market cigarette trade and the illegal sale of foreign drugs, according to a federal indictment unsealed Wednesday. Its owners received the loan in 2010 from a county fund meant to revitalize downtown Pikesville.
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
A pair of du Pont cousins, one in love with a woman and the other devoted to plants, used their vast family fortune to create a pair of mansions within minutes of each other in the Brandywine Valley, but from two very different worlds. Alfred I. du Pont, who grew up among the "powder men" his father employed and used his genius to expand the family's explosives business and save it from sale, poured his heart and a considerable fortune into building Nemours, which takes its inspiration from Marie Antoinette's Petit Trianon at Versailles and is a tribute to the family's French heritage.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
A family fight over German war reparations paid out a half-century after the Holocaust has no place in the Maryland court system, a Howard County Circuit Court judge has ruled. Because German authorities have determined that Columbia resident Gunther Gottfeld is the rightful heir to the family business, which was sold at a loss while the Nazis were in power, his cousin, Lia Miller, "has no viable legal claims [to the money] cognizable in a court in Maryland," Judge James B. Dudley wrote late last week.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
E. Eugene Frock, a caterer and musician who operated Frock's Sunnybrook Farm for more than 30 years, died Tuesday of a ruptured aortic aneurysm at Carroll Hospital Center. The Westminster native was 74. Gene Frock, as he was known, took over the family business in 1964 and expanded what had started in the 1930s as a swimming hole into a full-scale banquet facility. Lenders were skeptical that he could fill the banquet room that could hold more than 600, Mr. Frock told The Sun in 1997 as he prepared to retire and sell the 20-acre property near Westminster's business district.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
Searching for some good old-fashioned family fun that doesn't involve a video game? If so, you should check out Churchville Golf Range. This family-run recreation center, on Churchville Road, has two miniature golf courses, a driving range, nine softball and baseball batting cages, a golf pro shop and an arcade for those who still want their video game fix. Joyce and Ken Rizer purchased, renovated and expanded this Churchville gem from Joyce's...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.