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BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
C. Nelson Berman Sr., founder and former president of Belair Produce Co., died Monday of heart failure at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. He was 87 and a former Ruxton resident. Mr. Berman, a loquacious and perpetually cheerful man whose wide smile was as much a part of him as his easygoing demeanor, grew up in the produce business. Born and raised on East 33rd Street, Mr. Berman began working as a youngster in the produce stall his father, Maurice "Mollie" Berman, had established at Belair Market at Gay and Forest streets in 1910.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Recession being the bane of piano retailers, it seems wholly remarkable that Harry Cohen and his son, Lou, decided to start selling Baldwins and Wurlitzers in 1937 - the year the economy relapsed toward the end of the Great Depression. But somehow the Cohens survived the recession of 1937 and 1938. In fact, the family business, founded in Philadelphia, thrived through three generations and extended into three states. Hundreds of families in Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland bought new and used pianos from one of the Cohens over the years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 25, 1991
In a few weeks, the A.H. Fetting Co., the Tiffany of Baltimore-area jewelers, will join the legion of local businesses now fondly recalled, but only in the past tense.No more will customers pore over Fetting's showcases of carriage clocks, amethyst earrings and French porcelain coffee pots."The closing was a proper business decision but it doesn't eliminate the emotional aspects of all this," said John H. Fetting Jr., the fifth and last generation of his family to own the firm, now in Towson Town Center.
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The newest candidate for the House of Delegates in a district that includes parts of Baltimore and Howard counties has some big -- and soft -- shoes to fill. Renee McGuirk-Spence announced Tuesday that she has filed to run as a Democrat for one of three open House seats in the 12th District. A longtime aide to former Maryland school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, McGuirk-Spence is the daughter of the late state Sen. Harry J. McGuirk, a colorful character known in Maryland politics as "Soft Shoes" for the deftness of his legislative maneuvering.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
Albert "Bud" Hendler, retired president of Hendler Creamery Co., which produced ice cream in the Baltimore area for 60 years, died of heart failure Sunday at Brightwood Center, a retirement community in Brooklandville. He was 86.In 1955, Mr. Hendler took over operation of the company that was founded by his father, L. Manuel Hendler, in 1905. The company was in the former Baltimore City Passenger Railway Co. powerhouse in the 1100 block of E. Baltimore St. and was bought by Borden Co. in 1929.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | September 2, 2008
Michael Harry Kostinsky of Ellicott City, a small-business advocate in Annapolis and Washington, died Thursday, after suffering an apparent heart attack at his Arbutus restaurant. He was 56. Mr. Kostinsky transformed his father's pizza and sub shop, Sorrento of Arbutus, into a full-service restaurant and catering business; it has become a community fixture that employs more than 25 people. "I grew up with Sorrento," said former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who said he has eaten hundreds of meals there and liked the thin-crust pizza with extra sauce and mushrooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
It is truly a family affair, both onstage and off. Eric and Jenny Sheffer Stevens star in Center Stage's production of The Voysey Inheritance -- a century-old play about corruption in a family business -- as best friends who share a romantic bond. Offstage, the actors share a greater bond. The couple met while attending Wheaton College in Illinois before attending graduate school together at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival. They have performed together dozens of times during their 11-year marriage, but now they are dealing with parenthood.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
A family fight over German war reparations paid out a half-century after the Holocaust has no place in the Maryland court system, a Howard County Circuit Court judge has ruled. Because German authorities have determined that Columbia resident Gunther Gottfeld is the rightful heir to the family business, which was sold at a loss while the Nazis were in power, his cousin, Lia Miller, "has no viable legal claims [to the money] cognizable in a court in Maryland," Judge James B. Dudley wrote late last week.
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