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BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2003
Three Ellicott City businessmen are close to purchasing a landmark building that for more than 80 years housed Caplan's Department Store, an anchor on Main Street since the family business opened in 1895. The buyers - Dr. Bruce Taylor, Jared Spahn and Donald R. Reuwer Jr. - plan to restore the facade of the structure, where the Caplan family ran a thriving retail business and lived above the store. They expect to finalize the deal next month. In addition to renovating the building, the businessmen hope to build apartments on a vacant lot behind it that extends to St. Paul Street, said Spahn, president of Old Town Construction on Main Street.
NEWS
October 21, 2004
Marion S. Harwood, co-owner of a Baltimore art gallery and longtime volunteer, died of cardiac arrest Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 84 and had lived in Elkridge Estates since moving from her Roland Park home in 1986. Born Marion Smith in Baltimore and raised in Homeland, she was a graduate of Eastern High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. Mrs. Harwood worked for several years in the bacteriology laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital before her 1946 marriage to Richard R. Harwood Jr. In 1975, the couple purchased the Purnell Gallery in the 400 block of N. Charles St. Her husband, a former printing company executive, is president of the family business -- now in Hampden's Mill Center -- and Mrs. Harwood was vice president.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Ralph DeChiaro built a dynasty.He built hotels, houses and the suburban shopping plaza that came to be known as Towson Town Center. He amassed a fortune estimated at $150 million, set up trust funds for his heirs and turned to the family tree to fill his old CEO shoes.Then, at age 83, he became a reluctant witness to a dispiriting spectacle: his three daughters fighting over the spoils of his success.It was like watching his descendants contest his will -- without waiting for him to die."I made them all rich," the man known to his family as "Poppy" said one day from the witness stand in a Towson courtroom.
FEATURES
May 24, 2001
Laws for silence on the western front The Newport Beach, Calif., City Council took the first step toward approving a tougher noise ordinance, but not before the city's most famous noisemaker spoke his peace. Former basketball star Dennis Rodman, who has received more than 50 police visits and been fined more than $8,500 for violations of the current ordinance over the past year, told council members Tuesday that authorities are unfairly targeting him. "My complaint is that I get harassed every day," Rodman said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 14, 2008
Edward Stonewall "Eddie" Tochterman, former co-owner of T.G. Tochterman & Sons, the venerable Eastern Avenue tackle shop that has kept fishermen in rods and reels for more than 90 years, died in his sleep Sunday at Oak Crest Village retirement community in Parkville. He was 92. Mr. Tochterman, the son of Thomas G. and Anna K. Tochterman, was born at home at 244 S. Ann St. In 1916, the family moved to 1925 Eastern Ave., where they established a confectionary store. His father, who also worked at the Booth Fishery in the old Marsh Market, used to bring home unsold fish, fresh peelers or soft crabs, and sold them to streetcar-bound fishermen traveling to the Eastern Baltimore County fishing grounds.
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | September 2, 2008
Michael Harry Kostinsky of Ellicott City, a small-business advocate in Annapolis and Washington, died Thursday, after suffering an apparent heart attack at his Arbutus restaurant. He was 56. Mr. Kostinsky transformed his father's pizza and sub shop, Sorrento of Arbutus, into a full-service restaurant and catering business; it has become a community fixture that employs more than 25 people. "I grew up with Sorrento," said former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who said he has eaten hundreds of meals there and liked the thin-crust pizza with extra sauce and mushrooms.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2007
Arthur Kargman Painter, wallpaper hanger, business owner Kargmans Inc., Owings Mills Salary --$80,000 plus profits Age --38 Years on the job --24 How he got started --Kargman's father and uncle began hanging wallpaper in the late 1960s while living in Ukraine. When they moved to the United States in 1979, they continued to work on a part-time basis as a way to make extra money. In 1981, the two went full time and expanded their company to include interior and exterior painting and light carpentry work.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
A pair of du Pont cousins, one in love with a woman and the other devoted to plants, used their vast family fortune to create a pair of mansions within minutes of each other in the Brandywine Valley, but from two very different worlds. Alfred I. du Pont, who grew up among the "powder men" his father employed and used his genius to expand the family's explosives business and save it from sale, poured his heart and a considerable fortune into building Nemours, which takes its inspiration from Marie Antoinette's Petit Trianon at Versailles and is a tribute to the family's French heritage.
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