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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2010
James Bevard Eline, president and owner of one of the oldest family-owned funeral establishments in the nation, died Thursday from pulmonary fibrosis at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 74. Born in Baltimore into a family of funeral directors, Mr. Eline was the fourth generation of his family to own and operate Eline Funeral Home in Reisterstown. The funeral home was established by his paternal great-great-grandfather, E.D. Selby, a cabinet maker, in 1863. "It originally was called E.D. Selby Undertakers, and after his daughter married J.F. Eline, the business changed its name to J.F. Eline & Sons Undertakers in the 1890s," said his son, Jeffrey B. Eline of Reisterstown, who is a fifth-generation family member in the business.
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NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
A family fight over German war reparations paid out a half-century after the Holocaust has no place in the Maryland court system, a Howard County Circuit Court judge has ruled. Because German authorities have determined that Columbia resident Gunther Gottfeld is the rightful heir to the family business, which was sold at a loss while the Nazis were in power, his cousin, Lia Miller, "has no viable legal claims [to the money] cognizable in a court in Maryland," Judge James B. Dudley wrote late last week.
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
August Ernest "Bud" Eckels Jr., former president and general manager of a family-owned Baltimore ice cream manufacturing plant, died Thursday of a hemorrhage at a Leesburg, Fla., hospital. He was 88. Mr. Eckels, whose father established Eckels Ice Cream & Dairy Co. in 1918 and whose mother was a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Mayfield Avenue in the city's Arcadia neighborhood. He was a 1940 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. His college studies at the University of Maryland were interrupted when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Mr. Eckels, who was trained as a bombardier, flew 50 missions while based in Italy with the 15th Air Force's 464th Bomb Group.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Ralph DeChiaro built a dynasty.He built hotels, houses and the suburban shopping plaza that came to be known as Towson Town Center. He amassed a fortune estimated at $150 million, set up trust funds for his heirs and turned to the family tree to fill his old CEO shoes.Then, at age 83, he became a reluctant witness to a dispiriting spectacle: his three daughters fighting over the spoils of his success.It was like watching his descendants contest his will -- without waiting for him to die."I made them all rich," the man known to his family as "Poppy" said one day from the witness stand in a Towson courtroom.
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
Fletcher G. Mormann, a cabinetmaker who restored and upholstered furniture for nearly four decades, died Monday of respiratory complications at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation and Extended Care Center. The Westminster resident was 90. He was born in a rented house across the street from 5247 Reisterstown Road, where his father, also a cabinetmaker, was building his business and home for the family. They moved into the 19-room building in 1912. After graduating from a Forest Park High School vocational program, Mr. Mormann apprenticed with his father and eventually took over the family business, Fred.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
On one side of the counter of the V. Jordan Lumber Co. stand the pretzels and beverages for customers to munch on. On the other side is a notice reminding customers that the snacks, along with everything from doors to nuts, soon will be gone.The 48-year-old family-owned East Glen Burnie hardware store will go out of business around Thanksgiving Day, falling victim to a combination of growing competition, rising taxes and insurance, shrinking profits and a shriveled home-building market."We're definitely holding our own; we can pull through this if we choose to. But as a family, we do not choose to," said Steve Jordan, 30, who runs the business with his brother Kent, 28. They are grandsons of founder Vurl Jordan.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 27, 2010
Nearly 40 years ago, I learned that Baltimoreans never tire of tales about the stores where they shopped. At that time, I made a small career out of writing about the Bernheimer-Leader retailing empire at Howard and Fayette streets. The building is now an apartment house called the Atrium. About a year ago, I was contacted by Michael Lisicky, whose book on Hutzler's came out last year and whose John Wanamaker ( Philadelphia) opus is due for publication in a few months. A Fells Point resident and member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Lisicky is writing a history for the Fells Point newsletter about a place called Hecht's Reliable, on the east side of Broadway between Eastern and Fleet streets.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
E. Eugene Frock, a caterer and musician who operated Frock's Sunnybrook Farm for more than 30 years, died Tuesday of a ruptured aortic aneurysm at Carroll Hospital Center. The Westminster native was 74. Gene Frock, as he was known, took over the family business in 1964 and expanded what had started in the 1930s as a swimming hole into a full-scale banquet facility. Lenders were skeptical that he could fill the banquet room that could hold more than 600, Mr. Frock told The Sun in 1997 as he prepared to retire and sell the 20-acre property near Westminster's business district.
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