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By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
August Ernest "Bud" Eckels Jr., former president and general manager of a family-owned Baltimore ice cream manufacturing plant, died Thursday of a hemorrhage at a Leesburg, Fla., hospital. He was 88. Mr. Eckels, whose father established Eckels Ice Cream & Dairy Co. in 1918 and whose mother was a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Mayfield Avenue in the city's Arcadia neighborhood. He was a 1940 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. His college studies at the University of Maryland were interrupted when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Mr. Eckels, who was trained as a bombardier, flew 50 missions while based in Italy with the 15th Air Force's 464th Bomb Group.
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By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Ralph DeChiaro built a dynasty.He built hotels, houses and the suburban shopping plaza that came to be known as Towson Town Center. He amassed a fortune estimated at $150 million, set up trust funds for his heirs and turned to the family tree to fill his old CEO shoes.Then, at age 83, he became a reluctant witness to a dispiriting spectacle: his three daughters fighting over the spoils of his success.It was like watching his descendants contest his will -- without waiting for him to die."I made them all rich," the man known to his family as "Poppy" said one day from the witness stand in a Towson courtroom.
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By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
Stephen J. Glick was a man who wasn't happy until he knew exactly how things worked.This obsession made him an expert on every obscure regulation in golf, prevented him from having fun with a pocket computer until he'd figured out all of its functions and led him to the top at Rose Shanis, the personal loan business his mother founded in 1932."
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October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
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By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | September 2, 2008
Michael Harry Kostinsky of Ellicott City, a small-business advocate in Annapolis and Washington, died Thursday, after suffering an apparent heart attack at his Arbutus restaurant. He was 56. Mr. Kostinsky transformed his father's pizza and sub shop, Sorrento of Arbutus, into a full-service restaurant and catering business; it has become a community fixture that employs more than 25 people. "I grew up with Sorrento," said former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who said he has eaten hundreds of meals there and liked the thin-crust pizza with extra sauce and mushrooms.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
On one side of the counter of the V. Jordan Lumber Co. stand the pretzels and beverages for customers to munch on. On the other side is a notice reminding customers that the snacks, along with everything from doors to nuts, soon will be gone.The 48-year-old family-owned East Glen Burnie hardware store will go out of business around Thanksgiving Day, falling victim to a combination of growing competition, rising taxes and insurance, shrinking profits and a shriveled home-building market."We're definitely holding our own; we can pull through this if we choose to. But as a family, we do not choose to," said Steve Jordan, 30, who runs the business with his brother Kent, 28. They are grandsons of founder Vurl Jordan.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Charles Nelson Wells, a retired owner of a printing firm and a World War II veteran later honored for his service with a Congressional Gold Medal, died of a blood disorder Feb. 12 at Sinai Hospital. He was 87 and lived in Lochearn. Born in Baltimore and raised on Schroeder Street, he was the son of Charles Elliott Wells and Anna Nelson Wells. He was a 1944 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. As a young man he worked alongside his father as an apprentice at Watkins and Wells printers on West Lexington Street.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 14, 1992
The long line of patient customers at the Trinacria grocery store tells the secret of this Seton Hill institution.This time of the year, people stand in line, waiting for their number to be called -- often a 20-minute wait -- for pungent cheeses, salted codfish, salty dark olives and raisin-studded cakes imported to 406 N. Paca St.If the gustatory spread doesn't win them over, the prices do."We fight for the customers. We give them the goods and the price," said Vincent Fava as he hand-scooped a brown paper bag of pasta for a customer one morning last week.
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