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ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | January 1, 2006
The philosopher Roland Barthes called photographs remnants of an absent past, a species of semi-magical sign denoting something that once was, but that is no longer. Absence and loss are the subject of Mitch Epstein's Warehouse, 2000, one of the Baltimore Museum of Art's newest acquisitions. Senior contemporary art curator Darsie Alexander purchased the picture last year for the museum's photography collection with funds from a grant provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation. The 30-by-40-inch color image, which seems to depict an array of anonymous objects in an anonymous room in some anonymous city, exudes an almost ineffable sadness, like the poignance of a memorial.
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NEWS
April 14, 2003
4 volunteers sought for equal business opportunity panel County Executive James N. Robey is seeking four Howard County volunteers to serve on the Equal Business Opportunity Commission. The commission helps the county purchase goods and services from enterprises owned by members of minorities, women and the disabled. It also monitors the activities of the Economic Development Authority to ensure equal business opportunities in its programs. Members of the commission serve five years. They are appointed by the county executive and approved by the County Council.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1999
Anthony Thomas Jeppi, longtime proprietor of Baltimore's Jeppi Nut and Candy Co., died Monday from complications of diabetes at Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. He was 92.Mr. Jeppi headed the family business founded by his father, John Jeppi, in 1884 as a fruit and vegetable stall at the old Hanover Market at Sharp and Camden streets. The elder Jeppi, who died in 1943, immigrated to America from Cefalu, Italy."Peanuts moved very well at that location, and soon my father began specializing in all kinds of nuts," Mr. Jeppi told The Sunday Sun Magazine in 1975.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 19, 2009
Louis Francis Machacek, former owner of a Towson dry cleaning and tailoring establishment and a big-band buff, died Sunday of complications from an infection at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 87. Mr. Machacek was born and raised over the family business, Smrcina's Cleaners, which was established in 1913 by his grandfather in the 400 block of York Road. He was a 1938 graduate of Towson Catholic High School and earned a bachelor's degree in business from Loyola College in 1942.
NEWS
June 29, 2004
John W. "Jack" Lundy, 95, a lumber company owner who agreed to pay $30 in 1939 to sponsor one of the first three Little League teams, died Saturday at his central Pennsylvania home. On its opening day June 6, 1939, the Lundy Lumber team defeated Lycoming Dairy, 23-8. Mr. Lundy remained active in the organization for more than half a century. He visited the White House in 1989 when President George Bush commemorated the league's 50th anniversary. Mr. Lundy's family business - now called Lundy Construction - continues to support Little League teams.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
Our family takes pride in Dundalk and the people that live here. My family owns and operates a floral shop in the Dundalk area that dates back to 1910. Yes, ever community has it problems, but it seems that everyone likes to thrive on talking about Dundalk's bad news ("Odd crime tales rise again in Dundalk," June 1). I have tried several times to contact The Baltimore Sun about writing an article on our family business. As we celebrate 100 years in business this year, I have heard from no one at the Sunpaper, but let something bad happen in Dundalk, and you are here to report it. I guess there is no room for good news.
BUSINESS
By Carla Lazzareschi and Carla Lazzareschi,Los Angeles Times | September 20, 1992
Q: Several years ago, our accountant put our individual retirement accounts into a real estate investment. My husband had 5,150 shares worth $1 each; I had 2,715 shares. The name of the investment changed several times before I heard that the deal went bankrupt.Are these shares totally worthless? What happened to our money? -- D. H.A: Without knowing more, it's impossible to say precisely what happened to your investments and if you will ever see your money again. In all likelihood, your money is lost.
BUSINESS
By a Sun Staff Writer | January 21, 1995
Frank Perdue, who built a chicken empire by hawking his chicken on television for the last 20 years, will let his son, James, do the crowing from now on.In television advertisements scheduled to start airing next week, the elder Mr. Perdue says that although he's nearing retirement age -- he's 74 -- the company that bears his name won't be slacking off.Instead, as the cameras follow him through office corridors, Mr. Perdue dons a white coat and opens the...
NEWS
March 1, 2013
I could hardly believe my ears when President Barack Obama chastised lawmakers for focusing on the next election instead of the nation's business ("Military bases in Md. brace for U.S. budget cuts," Feb. 27). President Obama started his run for a second term right after the results of the first election were in. The last four years seemed to be one long campaign, but now with the term limits in effect this is wrong. Mr. Obama wants to keep "early education funding," which is just another way of saying free day care for the poor.
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