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By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
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By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2003
Three Ellicott City businessmen are close to purchasing a landmark building that for more than 80 years housed Caplan's Department Store, an anchor on Main Street since the family business opened in 1895. The buyers - Dr. Bruce Taylor, Jared Spahn and Donald R. Reuwer Jr. - plan to restore the facade of the structure, where the Caplan family ran a thriving retail business and lived above the store. They expect to finalize the deal next month. In addition to renovating the building, the businessmen hope to build apartments on a vacant lot behind it that extends to St. Paul Street, said Spahn, president of Old Town Construction on Main Street.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 1997
MOSCOW -- The Zotov family is reduced by new, post-Communist poverty to taking in washing to make ends meet. The brainless eldest son, Albert, invites a high-priced interior decorator to design a high-concept laundry for them.In walks a New Russian fop in white tie and tails, spewing English and French words and grandiose decorating schemes. He clashes instantly with the aging grandfather, an old Communist and veteran of many Soviet wars, who mistakes the title of designer for a Jewish surname.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | December 4, 1992
Mano Swartz, a family business that has wrapped Baltimore women in mink and sable for 103 years, will close its doors this month, saying it refuses to lower its quality standards to make the price cuts necessary to survive in today's market. In a letter to customers, company President Richard Swartz said the Towson store would sell off its entire inventory to invited guests "at a fraction of retail value" in a going-out-of-busines sale next Tuesday through Saturday. "It is with emotions astir that I tell you that Mano Swartz will close its doors," said the letter, dated Wednesday.
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
Albert "Bud" Hendler, retired president of Hendler Creamery Co., which produced ice cream in the Baltimore area for 60 years, died of heart failure Sunday at Brightwood Center, a retirement community in Brooklandville. He was 86.In 1955, Mr. Hendler took over operation of the company that was founded by his father, L. Manuel Hendler, in 1905. The company was in the former Baltimore City Passenger Railway Co. powerhouse in the 1100 block of E. Baltimore St. and was bought by Borden Co. in 1929.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 14, 1992
The long line of patient customers at the Trinacria grocery store tells the secret of this Seton Hill institution.This time of the year, people stand in line, waiting for their number to be called -- often a 20-minute wait -- for pungent cheeses, salted codfish, salty dark olives and raisin-studded cakes imported to 406 N. Paca St.If the gustatory spread doesn't win them over, the prices do."We fight for the customers. We give them the goods and the price," said Vincent Fava as he hand-scooped a brown paper bag of pasta for a customer one morning last week.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Charles Nelson Wells, a retired owner of a printing firm and a World War II veteran later honored for his service with a Congressional Gold Medal, died of a blood disorder Feb. 12 at Sinai Hospital. He was 87 and lived in Lochearn. Born in Baltimore and raised on Schroeder Street, he was the son of Charles Elliott Wells and Anna Nelson Wells. He was a 1944 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. As a young man he worked alongside his father as an apprentice at Watkins and Wells printers on West Lexington Street.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
A family fight over German war reparations paid out a half-century after the Holocaust has no place in the Maryland court system, a Howard County Circuit Court judge has ruled. Because German authorities have determined that Columbia resident Gunther Gottfeld is the rightful heir to the family business, which was sold at a loss while the Nazis were in power, his cousin, Lia Miller, "has no viable legal claims [to the money] cognizable in a court in Maryland," Judge James B. Dudley wrote late last week.
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