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Family Business

FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 19, 1994
The biggest laugh in Olney Theatre's production of Alan Ayckbourn's "A Small Family Business" comes in the opening scene. The family of a British businessman named Jack McCracken is giving him a surprise party to celebrate his quitting his old job to run the family business.While his large, extended family waits in the living room to surprise him, Jack arrives home with something altogether different in mind. Determined to make love to his wife, he has undressed down to his drawers and is babbling lasciviously when he chases her into the living room.
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Ralph DeChiaro built a dynasty.He built hotels, houses and the suburban shopping plaza that came to be known as Towson Town Center. He amassed a fortune estimated at $150 million, set up trust funds for his heirs and turned to the family tree to fill his old CEO shoes.Then, at age 83, he became a reluctant witness to a dispiriting spectacle: his three daughters fighting over the spoils of his success.It was like watching his descendants contest his will -- without waiting for him to die."I made them all rich," the man known to his family as "Poppy" said one day from the witness stand in a Towson courtroom.
NEWS
October 22, 2013
The Wellness for Life Fitness Center is a Francis family business. Lionel Francis took over the business a couple years ago, but he was a familiar fitness fixture there way before that. A believer in health and fitness, Lionel cares about all the members and there is a true family atmosphere at the gym. You often see Donna , his wife, and their children Collin and Cassondra there as well. Cassondra is a certified trainer at the gym. Lionel has been under the weather and unable to run the fitness center recently.
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The newest candidate for the House of Delegates in a district that includes parts of Baltimore and Howard counties has some big -- and soft -- shoes to fill. Renee McGuirk-Spence announced Tuesday that she has filed to run as a Democrat for one of three open House seats in the 12th District. A longtime aide to former Maryland school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, McGuirk-Spence is the daughter of the late state Sen. Harry J. McGuirk, a colorful character known in Maryland politics as "Soft Shoes" for the deftness of his legislative maneuvering.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
It is truly a family affair, both onstage and off. Eric and Jenny Sheffer Stevens star in Center Stage's production of The Voysey Inheritance -- a century-old play about corruption in a family business -- as best friends who share a romantic bond. Offstage, the actors share a greater bond. The couple met while attending Wheaton College in Illinois before attending graduate school together at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival. They have performed together dozens of times during their 11-year marriage, but now they are dealing with parenthood.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
A pair of du Pont cousins, one in love with a woman and the other devoted to plants, used their vast family fortune to create a pair of mansions within minutes of each other in the Brandywine Valley, but from two very different worlds. Alfred I. du Pont, who grew up among the "powder men" his father employed and used his genius to expand the family's explosives business and save it from sale, poured his heart and a considerable fortune into building Nemours, which takes its inspiration from Marie Antoinette's Petit Trianon at Versailles and is a tribute to the family's French heritage.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2010
James Bevard Eline, president and owner of one of the oldest family-owned funeral establishments in the nation, died Thursday from pulmonary fibrosis at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 74. Born in Baltimore into a family of funeral directors, Mr. Eline was the fourth generation of his family to own and operate Eline Funeral Home in Reisterstown. The funeral home was established by his paternal great-great-grandfather, E.D. Selby, a cabinet maker, in 1863. "It originally was called E.D. Selby Undertakers, and after his daughter married J.F. Eline, the business changed its name to J.F. Eline & Sons Undertakers in the 1890s," said his son, Jeffrey B. Eline of Reisterstown, who is a fifth-generation family member in the business.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
E. Eugene Frock, a caterer and musician who operated Frock's Sunnybrook Farm for more than 30 years, died Tuesday of a ruptured aortic aneurysm at Carroll Hospital Center. The Westminster native was 74. Gene Frock, as he was known, took over the family business in 1964 and expanded what had started in the 1930s as a swimming hole into a full-scale banquet facility. Lenders were skeptical that he could fill the banquet room that could hold more than 600, Mr. Frock told The Sun in 1997 as he prepared to retire and sell the 20-acre property near Westminster's business district.
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