Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFamily Business
IN THE NEWS

Family Business

NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2014
If there's any joy in Baltimore this week, it comes from baseball and the Orioles. With this frustrating city having slipped into another cycle of summer shootings - one of them ending the life of a 3-year-old girl - I guess we turn to baseball for communal relief from all that's awful, all that makes us angry and weary. Having the Orioles in first place helps. And, further, it helps to hear a pleasant fellow named Mike Cataneo tell why his father bought four season tickets to Orioles games 60 years ago, for the team's inaugural season here.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 1997
MOSCOW -- The Zotov family is reduced by new, post-Communist poverty to taking in washing to make ends meet. The brainless eldest son, Albert, invites a high-priced interior decorator to design a high-concept laundry for them.In walks a New Russian fop in white tie and tails, spewing English and French words and grandiose decorating schemes. He clashes instantly with the aging grandfather, an old Communist and veteran of many Soviet wars, who mistakes the title of designer for a Jewish surname.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
C. Nelson Berman Sr., founder and former president of Belair Produce Co., died Monday of heart failure at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. He was 87 and a former Ruxton resident. Mr. Berman, a loquacious and perpetually cheerful man whose wide smile was as much a part of him as his easygoing demeanor, grew up in the produce business. Born and raised on East 33rd Street, Mr. Berman began working as a youngster in the produce stall his father, Maurice "Mollie" Berman, had established at Belair Market at Gay and Forest streets in 1910.
NEWS
October 21, 2004
Marion S. Harwood, co-owner of a Baltimore art gallery and longtime volunteer, died of cardiac arrest Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 84 and had lived in Elkridge Estates since moving from her Roland Park home in 1986. Born Marion Smith in Baltimore and raised in Homeland, she was a graduate of Eastern High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. Mrs. Harwood worked for several years in the bacteriology laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital before her 1946 marriage to Richard R. Harwood Jr. In 1975, the couple purchased the Purnell Gallery in the 400 block of N. Charles St. Her husband, a former printing company executive, is president of the family business -- now in Hampden's Mill Center -- and Mrs. Harwood was vice president.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
Stephen J. Glick was a man who wasn't happy until he knew exactly how things worked.This obsession made him an expert on every obscure regulation in golf, prevented him from having fun with a pocket computer until he'd figured out all of its functions and led him to the top at Rose Shanis, the personal loan business his mother founded in 1932."
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Barton S. Mitchell, a retired asphalt paving company executive who was active in Maryland Republican politics and enjoyed collecting vintage cars, died Sunday of lung cancer at his Lutherville home. He was 73. "Bart was just a larger-than-life character who sucked all the air out of the room and loved playing the part of the 'Big Cheeeze,' which those who knew him called him. Everything with Bart was big, big, and I will miss him," said former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a longtime friend.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
A family fight over German war reparations paid out a half-century after the Holocaust has no place in the Maryland court system, a Howard County Circuit Court judge has ruled. Because German authorities have determined that Columbia resident Gunther Gottfeld is the rightful heir to the family business, which was sold at a loss while the Nazis were in power, his cousin, Lia Miller, "has no viable legal claims [to the money] cognizable in a court in Maryland," Judge James B. Dudley wrote late last week.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
E. Eugene Frock, a caterer and musician who operated Frock's Sunnybrook Farm for more than 30 years, died Tuesday of a ruptured aortic aneurysm at Carroll Hospital Center. The Westminster native was 74. Gene Frock, as he was known, took over the family business in 1964 and expanded what had started in the 1930s as a swimming hole into a full-scale banquet facility. Lenders were skeptical that he could fill the banquet room that could hold more than 600, Mr. Frock told The Sun in 1997 as he prepared to retire and sell the 20-acre property near Westminster's business district.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.