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By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
The flowers are not the only things in bloom at Kroh's Nursery year after year. In fact, this family business has deep roots that continue to grow in this Aberdeen nursery. In 1980, husband and wife, Robert and Mickie Sachs purchased Kroh's Nursery because they wanted to spend the rest of their lives working in a nursery and garden center. And after high school, their son Jeff started working the family business. Today, Jeff runs the day-to-day operations and says, “I started working in the nursery with my parents when I was just 10 years old. I remember holidays and Mother's Day, which are the busiest days of the year for us.” Though Robert and Mickie still work at the nursery today, Jeff Sachs runs the business and has expanded what they offer with custom design/build landscape services including hand crafted stone walls and patios, garden pools and waterfalls, and landscape maintenance.
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Ralph DeChiaro built a dynasty.He built hotels, houses and the suburban shopping plaza that came to be known as Towson Town Center. He amassed a fortune estimated at $150 million, set up trust funds for his heirs and turned to the family tree to fill his old CEO shoes.Then, at age 83, he became a reluctant witness to a dispiriting spectacle: his three daughters fighting over the spoils of his success.It was like watching his descendants contest his will -- without waiting for him to die."I made them all rich," the man known to his family as "Poppy" said one day from the witness stand in a Towson courtroom.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | October 12, 2011
I wish I had met Bosley Wright three years earlier. Back in 2008, I embarked on a do-it-mostly-myself kitchen renovation that included adding architectural millwork around the door and window frames. Easy enough, except that I wanted to match the existing original millwork installed in 1918. They didn't have anything even close at Lowes or Home Depot. Faced with what I thought was no other inexpensive option, I purchased raw lumber and then cut, chiseled, planed, and sanded the lumber to match.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 19, 2009
Louis Francis Machacek, former owner of a Towson dry cleaning and tailoring establishment and a big-band buff, died Sunday of complications from an infection at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 87. Mr. Machacek was born and raised over the family business, Smrcina's Cleaners, which was established in 1913 by his grandfather in the 400 block of York Road. He was a 1938 graduate of Towson Catholic High School and earned a bachelor's degree in business from Loyola College in 1942.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
Searching for some good old-fashioned family fun that doesn't involve a video game? If so, you should check out Churchville Golf Range. This family-run recreation center, on Churchville Road, has two miniature golf courses, a driving range, nine softball and baseball batting cages, a golf pro shop and an arcade for those who still want their video game fix. Joyce and Ken Rizer purchased, renovated and expanded this Churchville gem from Joyce's...
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
NEWS
October 21, 2004
Marion S. Harwood, co-owner of a Baltimore art gallery and longtime volunteer, died of cardiac arrest Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 84 and had lived in Elkridge Estates since moving from her Roland Park home in 1986. Born Marion Smith in Baltimore and raised in Homeland, she was a graduate of Eastern High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. Mrs. Harwood worked for several years in the bacteriology laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital before her 1946 marriage to Richard R. Harwood Jr. In 1975, the couple purchased the Purnell Gallery in the 400 block of N. Charles St. Her husband, a former printing company executive, is president of the family business -- now in Hampden's Mill Center -- and Mrs. Harwood was vice president.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 19, 1994
The biggest laugh in Olney Theatre's production of Alan Ayckbourn's "A Small Family Business" comes in the opening scene. The family of a British businessman named Jack McCracken is giving him a surprise party to celebrate his quitting his old job to run the family business.While his large, extended family waits in the living room to surprise him, Jack arrives home with something altogether different in mind. Determined to make love to his wife, he has undressed down to his drawers and is babbling lasciviously when he chases her into the living room.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
August Ernest "Bud" Eckels Jr., former president and general manager of a family-owned Baltimore ice cream manufacturing plant, died Thursday of a hemorrhage at a Leesburg, Fla., hospital. He was 88. Mr. Eckels, whose father established Eckels Ice Cream & Dairy Co. in 1918 and whose mother was a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Mayfield Avenue in the city's Arcadia neighborhood. He was a 1940 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. His college studies at the University of Maryland were interrupted when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Mr. Eckels, who was trained as a bombardier, flew 50 missions while based in Italy with the 15th Air Force's 464th Bomb Group.
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