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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
J.W. Treuth & Sons has been nestled in Oella so long, Michael Treuth said no one can figure out quite when the family-owned slaughterhouse and butcher shop first opened its doors, though a sign out front boasts more than 100 years in the business. The 56-year old president and co-owner has been working in the family business for more than 40 years, and said the meat industry is what he "lives and breathes, literally. " Treuth & Sons only slaughters cattle, but it also buys wholesale and then sells and ships chicken, poultry and seafood products to customers, primarily restaurants, nationwide.
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FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | October 12, 2011
I wish I had met Bosley Wright three years earlier. Back in 2008, I embarked on a do-it-mostly-myself kitchen renovation that included adding architectural millwork around the door and window frames. Easy enough, except that I wanted to match the existing original millwork installed in 1918. They didn't have anything even close at Lowes or Home Depot. Faced with what I thought was no other inexpensive option, I purchased raw lumber and then cut, chiseled, planed, and sanded the lumber to match.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Barton S. Mitchell, a retired asphalt paving company executive who was active in Maryland Republican politics and enjoyed collecting vintage cars, died Sunday of lung cancer at his Lutherville home. He was 73. "Bart was just a larger-than-life character who sucked all the air out of the room and loved playing the part of the 'Big Cheeeze,' which those who knew him called him. Everything with Bart was big, big, and I will miss him," said former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a longtime friend.
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 19, 1994
The biggest laugh in Olney Theatre's production of Alan Ayckbourn's "A Small Family Business" comes in the opening scene. The family of a British businessman named Jack McCracken is giving him a surprise party to celebrate his quitting his old job to run the family business.While his large, extended family waits in the living room to surprise him, Jack arrives home with something altogether different in mind. Determined to make love to his wife, he has undressed down to his drawers and is babbling lasciviously when he chases her into the living room.
NEWS
By Stephanie Gleason, Capital News Service | October 6, 2010
President Obama singled out a Mount Airy businesswoman, Theresa Alfaro Daytner, for her inspiring work building her business, during a speech honoring women in business this week. "I love Theresa's story," the president said before an audience that included billionaire investor Warren Buffett, hundreds of women entrepreneurs and 75 girls who aspire to become engineers, U.S. senators or professional race car drivers. The event in the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington was Fortune Magazine's "2010 Most Powerful Women Summit," and Daytner was named one of the periodical's 10 most powerful women entrepreneurs this year.
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
It is truly a family affair, both onstage and off. Eric and Jenny Sheffer Stevens star in Center Stage's production of The Voysey Inheritance -- a century-old play about corruption in a family business -- as best friends who share a romantic bond. Offstage, the actors share a greater bond. The couple met while attending Wheaton College in Illinois before attending graduate school together at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival. They have performed together dozens of times during their 11-year marriage, but now they are dealing with parenthood.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Charles Nelson Wells, a retired owner of a printing firm and a World War II veteran later honored for his service with a Congressional Gold Medal, died of a blood disorder Feb. 12 at Sinai Hospital. He was 87 and lived in Lochearn. Born in Baltimore and raised on Schroeder Street, he was the son of Charles Elliott Wells and Anna Nelson Wells. He was a 1944 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. As a young man he worked alongside his father as an apprentice at Watkins and Wells printers on West Lexington Street.
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