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NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | March 8, 1993
When her late husband first approached her nearly 50 years ago with the idea of running his own yacht yard, Carmella Petrini acknowledged, she was less than thrilled."
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
John Ostrowski, a renowned Southeast Baltimore sausage maker who refused to sell his product to supermarkets for wider distribution, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Somerford Place Assisted Living in Columbia. The Lutherville resident was 72. "As soon as you step through the front door of 524 S. Washington St., it hits you: the spicy, smoky, garlicky and altogether unmistakable smell of tradition," said a 2005 Baltimore Sun article about Mr. Ostrowski and his family business, Ostrowski's Famous Polish Sausage.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 25, 1991
In a few weeks, the A.H. Fetting Co., the Tiffany of Baltimore-area jewelers, will join the legion of local businesses now fondly recalled, but only in the past tense.No more will customers pore over Fetting's showcases of carriage clocks, amethyst earrings and French porcelain coffee pots."The closing was a proper business decision but it doesn't eliminate the emotional aspects of all this," said John H. Fetting Jr., the fifth and last generation of his family to own the firm, now in Towson Town Center.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2007
Arthur Kargman Painter, wallpaper hanger, business owner Kargmans Inc., Owings Mills Salary --$80,000 plus profits Age --38 Years on the job --24 How he got started --Kargman's father and uncle began hanging wallpaper in the late 1960s while living in Ukraine. When they moved to the United States in 1979, they continued to work on a part-time basis as a way to make extra money. In 1981, the two went full time and expanded their company to include interior and exterior painting and light carpentry work.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
Albert "Bud" Hendler, retired president of Hendler Creamery Co., which produced ice cream in the Baltimore area for 60 years, died of heart failure Sunday at Brightwood Center, a retirement community in Brooklandville. He was 86.In 1955, Mr. Hendler took over operation of the company that was founded by his father, L. Manuel Hendler, in 1905. The company was in the former Baltimore City Passenger Railway Co. powerhouse in the 1100 block of E. Baltimore St. and was bought by Borden Co. in 1929.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 16, 2010
Bettye J. Nelson, who co-founded Andy Nelson's Southern Pit Barbecue three decades ago, died Monday of lung cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Glen Arm resident was 77. Bettye J. Bryan, the daughter of a judge and a homemaker, was born and raised in Memphis, Tenn., where she graduated from Central High School in 1951. She met her future husband, Andrew V. Nelson Sr., when the two were students at Memphis State College, now the University of Memphis.
NEWS
December 23, 2007
On December 22, 2007, BRUCE CARL DIETLE, of Kingsville, MD, born 1/19/1924. Husband of the late Susan Belcher Dietle, beloved father of Daryl, Marlin, Melissa Anne Willams and Diane Dietle Pellegrini, grandfather of Brian, Kelsey, Travis, and Elizabeth, great grandfather of Liam. Survived by his sister Ada Goodwin and family. Pre-deceased by brother Sylvester and sister Catherine Deal. Born in Pocahontas, Pa , he spent his early years working at the home farm. A WWII veteran of the 82nd Airborne as a paratrooper, fighting in the front lines at the Battle of the Bulge.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
George Getschel's wife might be one of the luckiest women on the planet. As a trained gemologist who grew up in the jewelry business, he understands diamonds and exactly why they're a girl's best friend. And he has given his wife quite a few, he says. Getschel, 33, should know his gems. His great-grandfather started the Albert Smyth Co. — one of the area's most popular jewelry retailers. He left the family business after a few years — he calls the move "a natural progression" in his career — to attend graduate school and then work for Tiffany & Co. His latest venture is director of the Tiffany store to open Sept.
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2003
Three Ellicott City businessmen are close to purchasing a landmark building that for more than 80 years housed Caplan's Department Store, an anchor on Main Street since the family business opened in 1895. The buyers - Dr. Bruce Taylor, Jared Spahn and Donald R. Reuwer Jr. - plan to restore the facade of the structure, where the Caplan family ran a thriving retail business and lived above the store. They expect to finalize the deal next month. In addition to renovating the building, the businessmen hope to build apartments on a vacant lot behind it that extends to St. Paul Street, said Spahn, president of Old Town Construction on Main Street.
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