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NEWS
May 9, 1994
William Tuerke Jr.Former Tuerkes ownerWilliam A. Tuerke Jr., retired chairman and president of Tuerkes-Beckers Inc., the leather-goods chain, died Thursday of emphysema at Memorial Hospital in Easton. He was 84.Mr. Tuerke, who retired in 1983, inherited the leather-goods retailing business from his father, who had founded it in 1899.The company now has 13 stores, including several in Maryland. Shops sell luggage, handbags and other leather items, as well as an array of specialty and gift merchandise.
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EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
The flowers are not the only things in bloom at Kroh's Nursery year after year. In fact, this family business has deep roots that continue to grow in this Aberdeen nursery. In 1980, husband and wife, Robert and Mickie Sachs purchased Kroh's Nursery because they wanted to spend the rest of their lives working in a nursery and garden center. And after high school, their son Jeff started working the family business. Today, Jeff runs the day-to-day operations and says, “I started working in the nursery with my parents when I was just 10 years old. I remember holidays and Mother's Day, which are the busiest days of the year for us.” Though Robert and Mickie still work at the nursery today, Jeff Sachs runs the business and has expanded what they offer with custom design/build landscape services including hand crafted stone walls and patios, garden pools and waterfalls, and landscape maintenance.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | December 5, 1992
Mano Swartz, a family business that has wrapped Baltimor women in mink and sable for 103 years, will close this month, saying it refuses to lower its quality standards to make the price cuts necessary to survive in today's market. "It is with emotions astir that I tell you that Mano Swartz will close its doors," company President Richard Swartz said in a letter to customers dated Wednesday. Mr. Swartz told customers that the Towson store would sell off its entire inventory to invited guests "at a fraction of retail value" // in a going-out-of-business sale Tuesday through Saturday.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2014
If there's any joy in Baltimore this week, it comes from baseball and the Orioles. With this frustrating city having slipped into another cycle of summer shootings - one of them ending the life of a 3-year-old girl - I guess we turn to baseball for communal relief from all that's awful, all that makes us angry and weary. Having the Orioles in first place helps. And, further, it helps to hear a pleasant fellow named Mike Cataneo tell why his father bought four season tickets to Orioles games 60 years ago, for the team's inaugural season here.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Ralph DeChiaro built a dynasty.He built hotels, houses and the suburban shopping plaza that came to be known as Towson Town Center. He amassed a fortune estimated at $150 million, set up trust funds for his heirs and turned to the family tree to fill his old CEO shoes.Then, at age 83, he became a reluctant witness to a dispiriting spectacle: his three daughters fighting over the spoils of his success.It was like watching his descendants contest his will -- without waiting for him to die."I made them all rich," the man known to his family as "Poppy" said one day from the witness stand in a Towson courtroom.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
George Getschel's wife might be one of the luckiest women on the planet. As a trained gemologist who grew up in the jewelry business, he understands diamonds and exactly why they're a girl's best friend. And he has given his wife quite a few, he says. Getschel, 33, should know his gems. His great-grandfather started the Albert Smyth Co. — one of the area's most popular jewelry retailers. He left the family business after a few years — he calls the move "a natural progression" in his career — to attend graduate school and then work for Tiffany & Co. His latest venture is director of the Tiffany store to open Sept.
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 19, 1994
The biggest laugh in Olney Theatre's production of Alan Ayckbourn's "A Small Family Business" comes in the opening scene. The family of a British businessman named Jack McCracken is giving him a surprise party to celebrate his quitting his old job to run the family business.While his large, extended family waits in the living room to surprise him, Jack arrives home with something altogether different in mind. Determined to make love to his wife, he has undressed down to his drawers and is babbling lasciviously when he chases her into the living room.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
August Ernest "Bud" Eckels Jr., former president and general manager of a family-owned Baltimore ice cream manufacturing plant, died Thursday of a hemorrhage at a Leesburg, Fla., hospital. He was 88. Mr. Eckels, whose father established Eckels Ice Cream & Dairy Co. in 1918 and whose mother was a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Mayfield Avenue in the city's Arcadia neighborhood. He was a 1940 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. His college studies at the University of Maryland were interrupted when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Mr. Eckels, who was trained as a bombardier, flew 50 missions while based in Italy with the 15th Air Force's 464th Bomb Group.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Recession being the bane of piano retailers, it seems wholly remarkable that Harry Cohen and his son, Lou, decided to start selling Baldwins and Wurlitzers in 1937 - the year the economy relapsed toward the end of the Great Depression. But somehow the Cohens survived the recession of 1937 and 1938. In fact, the family business, founded in Philadelphia, thrived through three generations and extended into three states. Hundreds of families in Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland bought new and used pianos from one of the Cohens over the years.
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