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FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
A pair of du Pont cousins, one in love with a woman and the other devoted to plants, used their vast family fortune to create a pair of mansions within minutes of each other in the Brandywine Valley, but from two very different worlds. Alfred I. du Pont, who grew up among the "powder men" his father employed and used his genius to expand the family's explosives business and save it from sale, poured his heart and a considerable fortune into building Nemours, which takes its inspiration from Marie Antoinette's Petit Trianon at Versailles and is a tribute to the family's French heritage.
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BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | October 12, 2011
I wish I had met Bosley Wright three years earlier. Back in 2008, I embarked on a do-it-mostly-myself kitchen renovation that included adding architectural millwork around the door and window frames. Easy enough, except that I wanted to match the existing original millwork installed in 1918. They didn't have anything even close at Lowes or Home Depot. Faced with what I thought was no other inexpensive option, I purchased raw lumber and then cut, chiseled, planed, and sanded the lumber to match.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
The former chief executive of the Padonia Park Club in Cockeysville pleaded guilty Wednesday to distributing child pornography and will serve 18 months in prison. Ira Charles F. Rigger Jr. was sentenced to 10 years with all but 18 months suspended. He will be required to register as a sex offender and, according to his plea agreement, cannot be in the company of any child under the age of 18, with the exception of his now-8-month-old grandson — and then only in the presence of another adult.
NEWS
May 9, 1994
William Tuerke Jr.Former Tuerkes ownerWilliam A. Tuerke Jr., retired chairman and president of Tuerkes-Beckers Inc., the leather-goods chain, died Thursday of emphysema at Memorial Hospital in Easton. He was 84.Mr. Tuerke, who retired in 1983, inherited the leather-goods retailing business from his father, who had founded it in 1899.The company now has 13 stores, including several in Maryland. Shops sell luggage, handbags and other leather items, as well as an array of specialty and gift merchandise.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
J.W. Treuth & Sons has been nestled in Oella so long, Michael Treuth said no one can figure out quite when the family-owned slaughterhouse and butcher shop first opened its doors, though a sign out front boasts more than 100 years in the business. The 56-year old president and co-owner has been working in the family business for more than 40 years, and said the meat industry is what he "lives and breathes, literally. " Treuth & Sons only slaughters cattle, but it also buys wholesale and then sells and ships chicken, poultry and seafood products to customers, primarily restaurants, nationwide.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2014
If there's any joy in Baltimore this week, it comes from baseball and the Orioles. With this frustrating city having slipped into another cycle of summer shootings - one of them ending the life of a 3-year-old girl - I guess we turn to baseball for communal relief from all that's awful, all that makes us angry and weary. Having the Orioles in first place helps. And, further, it helps to hear a pleasant fellow named Mike Cataneo tell why his father bought four season tickets to Orioles games 60 years ago, for the team's inaugural season here.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2003
Three Ellicott City businessmen are close to purchasing a landmark building that for more than 80 years housed Caplan's Department Store, an anchor on Main Street since the family business opened in 1895. The buyers - Dr. Bruce Taylor, Jared Spahn and Donald R. Reuwer Jr. - plan to restore the facade of the structure, where the Caplan family ran a thriving retail business and lived above the store. They expect to finalize the deal next month. In addition to renovating the building, the businessmen hope to build apartments on a vacant lot behind it that extends to St. Paul Street, said Spahn, president of Old Town Construction on Main Street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
C. Nelson Berman Sr., founder and former president of Belair Produce Co., died Monday of heart failure at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. He was 87 and a former Ruxton resident. Mr. Berman, a loquacious and perpetually cheerful man whose wide smile was as much a part of him as his easygoing demeanor, grew up in the produce business. Born and raised on East 33rd Street, Mr. Berman began working as a youngster in the produce stall his father, Maurice "Mollie" Berman, had established at Belair Market at Gay and Forest streets in 1910.
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