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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2003
Three Ellicott City businessmen are close to purchasing a landmark building that for more than 80 years housed Caplan's Department Store, an anchor on Main Street since the family business opened in 1895. The buyers - Dr. Bruce Taylor, Jared Spahn and Donald R. Reuwer Jr. - plan to restore the facade of the structure, where the Caplan family ran a thriving retail business and lived above the store. They expect to finalize the deal next month. In addition to renovating the building, the businessmen hope to build apartments on a vacant lot behind it that extends to St. Paul Street, said Spahn, president of Old Town Construction on Main Street.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 19, 1994
The biggest laugh in Olney Theatre's production of Alan Ayckbourn's "A Small Family Business" comes in the opening scene. The family of a British businessman named Jack McCracken is giving him a surprise party to celebrate his quitting his old job to run the family business.While his large, extended family waits in the living room to surprise him, Jack arrives home with something altogether different in mind. Determined to make love to his wife, he has undressed down to his drawers and is babbling lasciviously when he chases her into the living room.
NEWS
By Stephanie Gleason, Capital News Service | October 6, 2010
President Obama singled out a Mount Airy businesswoman, Theresa Alfaro Daytner, for her inspiring work building her business, during a speech honoring women in business this week. "I love Theresa's story," the president said before an audience that included billionaire investor Warren Buffett, hundreds of women entrepreneurs and 75 girls who aspire to become engineers, U.S. senators or professional race car drivers. The event in the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington was Fortune Magazine's "2010 Most Powerful Women Summit," and Daytner was named one of the periodical's 10 most powerful women entrepreneurs this year.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
Albert "Bud" Hendler, retired president of Hendler Creamery Co., which produced ice cream in the Baltimore area for 60 years, died of heart failure Sunday at Brightwood Center, a retirement community in Brooklandville. He was 86.In 1955, Mr. Hendler took over operation of the company that was founded by his father, L. Manuel Hendler, in 1905. The company was in the former Baltimore City Passenger Railway Co. powerhouse in the 1100 block of E. Baltimore St. and was bought by Borden Co. in 1929.
NEWS
May 9, 1994
William Tuerke Jr.Former Tuerkes ownerWilliam A. Tuerke Jr., retired chairman and president of Tuerkes-Beckers Inc., the leather-goods chain, died Thursday of emphysema at Memorial Hospital in Easton. He was 84.Mr. Tuerke, who retired in 1983, inherited the leather-goods retailing business from his father, who had founded it in 1899.The company now has 13 stores, including several in Maryland. Shops sell luggage, handbags and other leather items, as well as an array of specialty and gift merchandise.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
A family fight over German war reparations paid out a half-century after the Holocaust has no place in the Maryland court system, a Howard County Circuit Court judge has ruled. Because German authorities have determined that Columbia resident Gunther Gottfeld is the rightful heir to the family business, which was sold at a loss while the Nazis were in power, his cousin, Lia Miller, "has no viable legal claims [to the money] cognizable in a court in Maryland," Judge James B. Dudley wrote late last week.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
Searching for some good old-fashioned family fun that doesn't involve a video game? If so, you should check out Churchville Golf Range. This family-run recreation center, on Churchville Road, has two miniature golf courses, a driving range, nine softball and baseball batting cages, a golf pro shop and an arcade for those who still want their video game fix. Joyce and Ken Rizer purchased, renovated and expanded this Churchville gem from Joyce's...
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | January 1, 2006
The philosopher Roland Barthes called photographs remnants of an absent past, a species of semi-magical sign denoting something that once was, but that is no longer. Absence and loss are the subject of Mitch Epstein's Warehouse, 2000, one of the Baltimore Museum of Art's newest acquisitions. Senior contemporary art curator Darsie Alexander purchased the picture last year for the museum's photography collection with funds from a grant provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation. The 30-by-40-inch color image, which seems to depict an array of anonymous objects in an anonymous room in some anonymous city, exudes an almost ineffable sadness, like the poignance of a memorial.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1999
Anthony Thomas Jeppi, longtime proprietor of Baltimore's Jeppi Nut and Candy Co., died Monday from complications of diabetes at Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. He was 92.Mr. Jeppi headed the family business founded by his father, John Jeppi, in 1884 as a fruit and vegetable stall at the old Hanover Market at Sharp and Camden streets. The elder Jeppi, who died in 1943, immigrated to America from Cefalu, Italy."Peanuts moved very well at that location, and soon my father began specializing in all kinds of nuts," Mr. Jeppi told The Sunday Sun Magazine in 1975.
NEWS
April 14, 2003
4 volunteers sought for equal business opportunity panel County Executive James N. Robey is seeking four Howard County volunteers to serve on the Equal Business Opportunity Commission. The commission helps the county purchase goods and services from enterprises owned by members of minorities, women and the disabled. It also monitors the activities of the Economic Development Authority to ensure equal business opportunities in its programs. Members of the commission serve five years. They are appointed by the county executive and approved by the County Council.
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