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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2003
Three Ellicott City businessmen are close to purchasing a landmark building that for more than 80 years housed Caplan's Department Store, an anchor on Main Street since the family business opened in 1895. The buyers - Dr. Bruce Taylor, Jared Spahn and Donald R. Reuwer Jr. - plan to restore the facade of the structure, where the Caplan family ran a thriving retail business and lived above the store. They expect to finalize the deal next month. In addition to renovating the building, the businessmen hope to build apartments on a vacant lot behind it that extends to St. Paul Street, said Spahn, president of Old Town Construction on Main Street.
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EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
The flowers are not the only things in bloom at Kroh's Nursery year after year. In fact, this family business has deep roots that continue to grow in this Aberdeen nursery. In 1980, husband and wife, Robert and Mickie Sachs purchased Kroh's Nursery because they wanted to spend the rest of their lives working in a nursery and garden center. And after high school, their son Jeff started working the family business. Today, Jeff runs the day-to-day operations and says, “I started working in the nursery with my parents when I was just 10 years old. I remember holidays and Mother's Day, which are the busiest days of the year for us.” Though Robert and Mickie still work at the nursery today, Jeff Sachs runs the business and has expanded what they offer with custom design/build landscape services including hand crafted stone walls and patios, garden pools and waterfalls, and landscape maintenance.
NEWS
October 22, 2013
The Wellness for Life Fitness Center is a Francis family business. Lionel Francis took over the business a couple years ago, but he was a familiar fitness fixture there way before that. A believer in health and fitness, Lionel cares about all the members and there is a true family atmosphere at the gym. You often see Donna , his wife, and their children Collin and Cassondra there as well. Cassondra is a certified trainer at the gym. Lionel has been under the weather and unable to run the fitness center recently.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 25, 1991
In a few weeks, the A.H. Fetting Co., the Tiffany of Baltimore-area jewelers, will join the legion of local businesses now fondly recalled, but only in the past tense.No more will customers pore over Fetting's showcases of carriage clocks, amethyst earrings and French porcelain coffee pots."The closing was a proper business decision but it doesn't eliminate the emotional aspects of all this," said John H. Fetting Jr., the fifth and last generation of his family to own the firm, now in Towson Town Center.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The newest candidate for the House of Delegates in a district that includes parts of Baltimore and Howard counties has some big -- and soft -- shoes to fill. Renee McGuirk-Spence announced Tuesday that she has filed to run as a Democrat for one of three open House seats in the 12th District. A longtime aide to former Maryland school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, McGuirk-Spence is the daughter of the late state Sen. Harry J. McGuirk, a colorful character known in Maryland politics as "Soft Shoes" for the deftness of his legislative maneuvering.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1999
Anthony Thomas Jeppi, longtime proprietor of Baltimore's Jeppi Nut and Candy Co., died Monday from complications of diabetes at Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. He was 92.Mr. Jeppi headed the family business founded by his father, John Jeppi, in 1884 as a fruit and vegetable stall at the old Hanover Market at Sharp and Camden streets. The elder Jeppi, who died in 1943, immigrated to America from Cefalu, Italy."Peanuts moved very well at that location, and soon my father began specializing in all kinds of nuts," Mr. Jeppi told The Sunday Sun Magazine in 1975.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2014
If there's any joy in Baltimore this week, it comes from baseball and the Orioles. With this frustrating city having slipped into another cycle of summer shootings - one of them ending the life of a 3-year-old girl - I guess we turn to baseball for communal relief from all that's awful, all that makes us angry and weary. Having the Orioles in first place helps. And, further, it helps to hear a pleasant fellow named Mike Cataneo tell why his father bought four season tickets to Orioles games 60 years ago, for the team's inaugural season here.
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
C. Nelson Berman Sr., founder and former president of Belair Produce Co., died Monday of heart failure at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. He was 87 and a former Ruxton resident. Mr. Berman, a loquacious and perpetually cheerful man whose wide smile was as much a part of him as his easygoing demeanor, grew up in the produce business. Born and raised on East 33rd Street, Mr. Berman began working as a youngster in the produce stall his father, Maurice "Mollie" Berman, had established at Belair Market at Gay and Forest streets in 1910.
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