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By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
John "Jack" M.E. Hasslinger Jr., an accountant who managed a well-known family seafood business, died of heart disease Tuesday at his Mount Airy home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised on Jody Way in Timonium, he was the son of John M.E. Hasslinger Sr., a piano tuner and instructor, and the former Ellen Regina Cosgrove, a homemaker. He was a 1969 graduate of Loyola High School at Blakefield and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration at Loyola University Maryland.
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By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
The flowers are not the only things in bloom at Kroh's Nursery year after year. In fact, this family business has deep roots that continue to grow in this Aberdeen nursery. In 1980, husband and wife, Robert and Mickie Sachs purchased Kroh's Nursery because they wanted to spend the rest of their lives working in a nursery and garden center. And after high school, their son Jeff started working the family business. Today, Jeff runs the day-to-day operations and says, “I started working in the nursery with my parents when I was just 10 years old. I remember holidays and Mother's Day, which are the busiest days of the year for us.” Though Robert and Mickie still work at the nursery today, Jeff Sachs runs the business and has expanded what they offer with custom design/build landscape services including hand crafted stone walls and patios, garden pools and waterfalls, and landscape maintenance.
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By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
Searching for some good old-fashioned family fun that doesn't involve a video game? If so, you should check out Churchville Golf Range. This family-run recreation center, on Churchville Road, has two miniature golf courses, a driving range, nine softball and baseball batting cages, a golf pro shop and an arcade for those who still want their video game fix. Joyce and Ken Rizer purchased, renovated and expanded this Churchville gem from Joyce's...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2014
If there's any joy in Baltimore this week, it comes from baseball and the Orioles. With this frustrating city having slipped into another cycle of summer shootings - one of them ending the life of a 3-year-old girl - I guess we turn to baseball for communal relief from all that's awful, all that makes us angry and weary. Having the Orioles in first place helps. And, further, it helps to hear a pleasant fellow named Mike Cataneo tell why his father bought four season tickets to Orioles games 60 years ago, for the team's inaugural season here.
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2003
Three Ellicott City businessmen are close to purchasing a landmark building that for more than 80 years housed Caplan's Department Store, an anchor on Main Street since the family business opened in 1895. The buyers - Dr. Bruce Taylor, Jared Spahn and Donald R. Reuwer Jr. - plan to restore the facade of the structure, where the Caplan family ran a thriving retail business and lived above the store. They expect to finalize the deal next month. In addition to renovating the building, the businessmen hope to build apartments on a vacant lot behind it that extends to St. Paul Street, said Spahn, president of Old Town Construction on Main Street.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 19, 1994
The biggest laugh in Olney Theatre's production of Alan Ayckbourn's "A Small Family Business" comes in the opening scene. The family of a British businessman named Jack McCracken is giving him a surprise party to celebrate his quitting his old job to run the family business.While his large, extended family waits in the living room to surprise him, Jack arrives home with something altogether different in mind. Determined to make love to his wife, he has undressed down to his drawers and is babbling lasciviously when he chases her into the living room.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 14, 2008
Edward Stonewall "Eddie" Tochterman, former co-owner of T.G. Tochterman & Sons, the venerable Eastern Avenue tackle shop that has kept fishermen in rods and reels for more than 90 years, died in his sleep Sunday at Oak Crest Village retirement community in Parkville. He was 92. Mr. Tochterman, the son of Thomas G. and Anna K. Tochterman, was born at home at 244 S. Ann St. In 1916, the family moved to 1925 Eastern Ave., where they established a confectionary store. His father, who also worked at the Booth Fishery in the old Marsh Market, used to bring home unsold fish, fresh peelers or soft crabs, and sold them to streetcar-bound fishermen traveling to the Eastern Baltimore County fishing grounds.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
Stephen J. Glick was a man who wasn't happy until he knew exactly how things worked.This obsession made him an expert on every obscure regulation in golf, prevented him from having fun with a pocket computer until he'd figured out all of its functions and led him to the top at Rose Shanis, the personal loan business his mother founded in 1932."
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
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