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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
J.W. Treuth & Sons has been nestled in Oella so long, Michael Treuth said no one can figure out quite when the family-owned slaughterhouse and butcher shop first opened its doors, though a sign out front boasts more than 100 years in the business. The 56-year old president and co-owner has been working in the family business for more than 40 years, and said the meat industry is what he "lives and breathes, literally. " Treuth & Sons only slaughters cattle, but it also buys wholesale and then sells and ships chicken, poultry and seafood products to customers, primarily restaurants, nationwide.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
John "Jack" M.E. Hasslinger Jr., an accountant who managed a well-known family seafood business, died of heart disease Tuesday at his Mount Airy home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised on Jody Way in Timonium, he was the son of John M.E. Hasslinger Sr., a piano tuner and instructor, and the former Ellen Regina Cosgrove, a homemaker. He was a 1969 graduate of Loyola High School at Blakefield and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration at Loyola University Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
George Getschel's wife might be one of the luckiest women on the planet. As a trained gemologist who grew up in the jewelry business, he understands diamonds and exactly why they're a girl's best friend. And he has given his wife quite a few, he says. Getschel, 33, should know his gems. His great-grandfather started the Albert Smyth Co. — one of the area's most popular jewelry retailers. He left the family business after a few years — he calls the move "a natural progression" in his career — to attend graduate school and then work for Tiffany & Co. His latest venture is director of the Tiffany store to open Sept.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
Stephen J. Glick was a man who wasn't happy until he knew exactly how things worked.This obsession made him an expert on every obscure regulation in golf, prevented him from having fun with a pocket computer until he'd figured out all of its functions and led him to the top at Rose Shanis, the personal loan business his mother founded in 1932."
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | April 27, 2007
Trimpers consider ending long Ocean City ride ... After entertaining generations of beach-goers with a conglomeration of rides, arcades and games, Ocean City's signature boardwalk business - Trimper Rides - could be headed for its 117th and final season. Members of the family that runs the company say skyrocketing tax assessments, along with disputes among shareholders, could force them to close after this summer unless they get some form of tax abatement or other financial help. Doug Trimper, vice president of the family business that controls most of a three-block parcel from Dorchester Street to the Ocean City Inlet at the southern tip of the old downtown district, said yesterday that the familiar whirling rides and noisy arcades will be open this summer.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2007
Arthur Kargman Painter, wallpaper hanger, business owner Kargmans Inc., Owings Mills Salary --$80,000 plus profits Age --38 Years on the job --24 How he got started --Kargman's father and uncle began hanging wallpaper in the late 1960s while living in Ukraine. When they moved to the United States in 1979, they continued to work on a part-time basis as a way to make extra money. In 1981, the two went full time and expanded their company to include interior and exterior painting and light carpentry work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | January 1, 2006
The philosopher Roland Barthes called photographs remnants of an absent past, a species of semi-magical sign denoting something that once was, but that is no longer. Absence and loss are the subject of Mitch Epstein's Warehouse, 2000, one of the Baltimore Museum of Art's newest acquisitions. Senior contemporary art curator Darsie Alexander purchased the picture last year for the museum's photography collection with funds from a grant provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation. The 30-by-40-inch color image, which seems to depict an array of anonymous objects in an anonymous room in some anonymous city, exudes an almost ineffable sadness, like the poignance of a memorial.
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 25, 1991
In a few weeks, the A.H. Fetting Co., the Tiffany of Baltimore-area jewelers, will join the legion of local businesses now fondly recalled, but only in the past tense.No more will customers pore over Fetting's showcases of carriage clocks, amethyst earrings and French porcelain coffee pots."The closing was a proper business decision but it doesn't eliminate the emotional aspects of all this," said John H. Fetting Jr., the fifth and last generation of his family to own the firm, now in Towson Town Center.
FEATURES
May 24, 2001
Laws for silence on the western front The Newport Beach, Calif., City Council took the first step toward approving a tougher noise ordinance, but not before the city's most famous noisemaker spoke his peace. Former basketball star Dennis Rodman, who has received more than 50 police visits and been fined more than $8,500 for violations of the current ordinance over the past year, told council members Tuesday that authorities are unfairly targeting him. "My complaint is that I get harassed every day," Rodman said.
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