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By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
The flowers are not the only things in bloom at Kroh's Nursery year after year. In fact, this family business has deep roots that continue to grow in this Aberdeen nursery. In 1980, husband and wife, Robert and Mickie Sachs purchased Kroh's Nursery because they wanted to spend the rest of their lives working in a nursery and garden center. And after high school, their son Jeff started working the family business. Today, Jeff runs the day-to-day operations and says, “I started working in the nursery with my parents when I was just 10 years old. I remember holidays and Mother's Day, which are the busiest days of the year for us.” Though Robert and Mickie still work at the nursery today, Jeff Sachs runs the business and has expanded what they offer with custom design/build landscape services including hand crafted stone walls and patios, garden pools and waterfalls, and landscape maintenance.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The newest candidate for the House of Delegates in a district that includes parts of Baltimore and Howard counties has some big -- and soft -- shoes to fill. Renee McGuirk-Spence announced Tuesday that she has filed to run as a Democrat for one of three open House seats in the 12th District. A longtime aide to former Maryland school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, McGuirk-Spence is the daughter of the late state Sen. Harry J. McGuirk, a colorful character known in Maryland politics as "Soft Shoes" for the deftness of his legislative maneuvering.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2007
Arthur Kargman Painter, wallpaper hanger, business owner Kargmans Inc., Owings Mills Salary --$80,000 plus profits Age --38 Years on the job --24 How he got started --Kargman's father and uncle began hanging wallpaper in the late 1960s while living in Ukraine. When they moved to the United States in 1979, they continued to work on a part-time basis as a way to make extra money. In 1981, the two went full time and expanded their company to include interior and exterior painting and light carpentry work.
NEWS
May 9, 1994
William Tuerke Jr.Former Tuerkes ownerWilliam A. Tuerke Jr., retired chairman and president of Tuerkes-Beckers Inc., the leather-goods chain, died Thursday of emphysema at Memorial Hospital in Easton. He was 84.Mr. Tuerke, who retired in 1983, inherited the leather-goods retailing business from his father, who had founded it in 1899.The company now has 13 stores, including several in Maryland. Shops sell luggage, handbags and other leather items, as well as an array of specialty and gift merchandise.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 27, 2010
Nearly 40 years ago, I learned that Baltimoreans never tire of tales about the stores where they shopped. At that time, I made a small career out of writing about the Bernheimer-Leader retailing empire at Howard and Fayette streets. The building is now an apartment house called the Atrium. About a year ago, I was contacted by Michael Lisicky, whose book on Hutzler's came out last year and whose John Wanamaker ( Philadelphia) opus is due for publication in a few months. A Fells Point resident and member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Lisicky is writing a history for the Fells Point newsletter about a place called Hecht's Reliable, on the east side of Broadway between Eastern and Fleet streets.
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 7, 2003
After 19 years of running and owning a franchised barbecue restaurant, Bob Hudgins talks in impersonal terms about the hopes of small-business owners, but you know he's talking about himself. "So many people work so hard to start a business," Hudgins said. "You hate to see it go by the wayside." "I'm 71 years old, so I'm going to have to get out of it one of these days," he said. "So, either I have someone take over or I have to sell it." That's where his younger daughter, Tiffany, 22, might come in. She is a recent college graduate with a degree in business and has a firm sense of practicality.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Ralph DeChiaro built a dynasty.He built hotels, houses and the suburban shopping plaza that came to be known as Towson Town Center. He amassed a fortune estimated at $150 million, set up trust funds for his heirs and turned to the family tree to fill his old CEO shoes.Then, at age 83, he became a reluctant witness to a dispiriting spectacle: his three daughters fighting over the spoils of his success.It was like watching his descendants contest his will -- without waiting for him to die."I made them all rich," the man known to his family as "Poppy" said one day from the witness stand in a Towson courtroom.
NEWS
By Ellen Barry and Ellen Barry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2004
LAFAYETTE, Ga. - To the families hoping to learn why Brent Marsh left hundreds of human bodies to rot on his property instead of cremating them, he gave a flat answer yesterday: There was no reason. In a plea deal that will mean 12 years in prison, Marsh admitted to dumping 334 bodies. He also will write individual letters of apology to the survivors of each corpse found at his Tri-State Crematory. Had the case gone to trial, he faced the possibility of 8,000 years behind bars. In February 2002, an anonymous tip led federal authorities to the property in Noble, Ga., where they found bodies stacked in vaults, dumped in pits and entangled with garbage and underbrush.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 25, 1991
In a few weeks, the A.H. Fetting Co., the Tiffany of Baltimore-area jewelers, will join the legion of local businesses now fondly recalled, but only in the past tense.No more will customers pore over Fetting's showcases of carriage clocks, amethyst earrings and French porcelain coffee pots."The closing was a proper business decision but it doesn't eliminate the emotional aspects of all this," said John H. Fetting Jr., the fifth and last generation of his family to own the firm, now in Towson Town Center.
FEATURES
May 24, 2001
Laws for silence on the western front The Newport Beach, Calif., City Council took the first step toward approving a tougher noise ordinance, but not before the city's most famous noisemaker spoke his peace. Former basketball star Dennis Rodman, who has received more than 50 police visits and been fined more than $8,500 for violations of the current ordinance over the past year, told council members Tuesday that authorities are unfairly targeting him. "My complaint is that I get harassed every day," Rodman said.
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