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Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
What if braces were considered fashionable and could actually boost a patient's self-esteem? That was the question on the minds of the daughters of a Columbia pediatric dentist when they hit upon the idea of Bracket Ears - earrings made from oversized, surgical steel brackets that come with colorful bands to match with your braces. And further, what if a portion of the profits was tied to charitable contributions? “I never imagined I would be doing this,” says Dr. Casey Crafton of Crafton Dental, located off Old Columbia Road in Kings Contrivance.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
John "Jack" M.E. Hasslinger Jr., an accountant who managed a well-known family seafood business, died of heart disease Tuesday at his Mount Airy home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised on Jody Way in Timonium, he was the son of John M.E. Hasslinger Sr., a piano tuner and instructor, and the former Ellen Regina Cosgrove, a homemaker. He was a 1969 graduate of Loyola High School at Blakefield and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration at Loyola University Maryland.
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NEWS
February 7, 2006
Family matters, but when it comes to city business involving family, Baltimore City Council President Sheila Dixon must step aside. There's no ambiguity in the city ethics law on this point: An elected official must refrain from "any matter" involving a sibling's interest. Ms. Dixon never should have participated in a City Council discussion on minority involvement in the city's cable franchise because her sister works for a firm that has gotten this work in the past. The council president should know better.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
A family-owned produce distributor has moved from Washington to a new base in Jessup, where its 80 employees work to package and transport more than 1 million pounds of tomatoes each week. Pete Pappas & Sons Inc., founded in 1942 in Washington as a tomato distributor, started operations in August at its 120,000-square-foot warehouse in Jessup, said Paul S. Pappas, general manager for the firm, which is in its fourth generation of family ownership. The larger property will allow the firm to expand into new types of produce from its tomato and berries, he said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
Shortly after Boo Corrigan was hired as Army's athletic director earlier this year, he found himself talking to a group of graduates of the U.S. Military Academy. Nobody in the room noticed, but Corrigan seemed to be doing a pretty good imitation of a man many consider one of the most influential and respected college athletic administrators of his time. "I found my mannerisms were the same as my dad, the way I was talking," Corrigan recalled. "He's a lot smarter than I am. I called my brother David and said, 'I think I've become Papa Gene.'" The influence of his father, a Baltimore native who was the athletic director at Virginia and Notre Dame before becoming the commissioner of the Atlantic Coast Conference, was what directed his now 44-year old son back into what essentially was the family business.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Growing up, when Alex Pownall watched his father, he saw a man who loved his job. John Pownall has served 20 years in the military, the last 12 as a recruiter for the Maryland National Guard. He was sent to defend Andrews Air Force Base after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and advised the Afghan National Army in 2011 and 2012. "He looked forward to drill, and he came home happy," Alex Pownall said. So when Alex turned 17 last year, he needed no convincing. He joined the Maryland National Guard in October and is waiting to finish high school so he can go to boot camp.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2011
On Christmas morning, an unidentified man called the restaurant and liquor store Wesley's in Elkton and asked for the winning Powerball numbers. When a clerk read the numbers over the phone, the mystery caller said, "Looks like I am the winner. " So far, that's all the longtime family-run restaurant, lounge and liquor store knows about the person who won the $125 million jackpot. Maryland Lottery officials don't know who the winner is either. Like nearly all state offices, the agency was closed Monday, said spokeswoman Carole Y. Everett.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter | November 21, 1990
If you own a family business and you plan that your children will continue it, you have to act now. If you do not, you risk that when you and your spouse die, the business may be sold or liquidated to pay estate taxes. It happens all too often, yet usually can be avoided by careful planning.Congress is expected to dig deeper into the assets of estates in its continuing search for increased federal revenue. With America's population growing older and wealthier, estates obviously are a rich source for new tax money, waiting to be mined.
NEWS
February 2, 2005
Barbara A. Stritzinger, a retired co-owner and business manager of a family-owned appliance refinishing business, died of leukemia Jan. 26 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Long Green resident was 83. Barbara A. Vasold was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown. She was a graduate of St. Michael's Business School and in 1943 married Aloysius J. Stritzinger. In 1955, the couple established Appliance Refinishers Inc. in Long Green, specializing in appliances, kitchen cabinets and furniture.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 4, 2004
FORTY-FIVE YEARS ago, after his team won the world championship in sudden death overtime, Arthur Donovan, legendary Baltimore Colt and Falstaff of American football, invested his bonus in a country club without a golf course. But while the Valley Country Club, in the Riderwood area of Baltimore County, might not have had 18 holes and fabulous fairways, it had the grand, 19th-century hilltop manor house and 12 acres of a former dairy farm. With Artie Donovan's winnings from the December 1958 NFL championship, it soon had tennis courts, a snack bar, a clubhouse and the huge swimming pool that more than 400 members, their families and friends still enjoy each summer.
NEWS
Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
What if braces were considered fashionable and could actually boost a patient's self-esteem? That was the question on the minds of the daughters of a Columbia pediatric dentist when they hit upon the idea of Bracket Ears - earrings made from oversized, surgical steel brackets that come with colorful bands to match with your braces. And further, what if a portion of the profits was tied to charitable contributions? “I never imagined I would be doing this,” says Dr. Casey Crafton of Crafton Dental, located off Old Columbia Road in Kings Contrivance.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2014
If there's any joy in Baltimore this week, it comes from baseball and the Orioles. With this frustrating city having slipped into another cycle of summer shootings - one of them ending the life of a 3-year-old girl - I guess we turn to baseball for communal relief from all that's awful, all that makes us angry and weary. Having the Orioles in first place helps. And, further, it helps to hear a pleasant fellow named Mike Cataneo tell why his father bought four season tickets to Orioles games 60 years ago, for the team's inaugural season here.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
The main drag outside this former general store in the homey waterfront community of Havre de Grace - a short hop off U.S. 40 north of Baltimore - is drenched in Americana. Antiques shops and local art galleries dominate the street, clustered behind kitschy window displays of knickknacks. A sign advertising a summer seafood festival is posted outside an independent bookstore. But at the back of Mary Martin's downtown shop, you'll discover a far wider world, collated in an assortment of postcards, some featuring nearby small towns but many others far-flung foreign cities.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
J.W. Treuth & Sons has been nestled in Oella so long, Michael Treuth said no one can figure out quite when the family-owned slaughterhouse and butcher shop first opened its doors, though a sign out front boasts more than 100 years in the business. The 56-year old president and co-owner has been working in the family business for more than 40 years, and said the meat industry is what he "lives and breathes, literally. " Treuth & Sons only slaughters cattle, but it also buys wholesale and then sells and ships chicken, poultry and seafood products to customers, primarily restaurants, nationwide.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
Leaning against a wall near a row of vacuums in his store, Morris Weiner winked at one of his customers and smiled mischievously. He nodded in the direction of his daughter, Jeri Cuffley, seated at a desk and gazing intently at a computer screen. "That Jeri, she's no damned good," Weiner said. "She's just a big mess. " Cuffley, however, simply ignored her father. When asked why, she shook her head and responded, "Because I know my father. I've met him once or twice. That's just how he is. " Weiner burst out laughing and shouted, "That's it, Jeri, you're out of the will!"
BUSINESS
By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 22, 1991
Approaching age 65 and concerned for their family's future, Florence and Hank Billing began figuring out how to pass along their family business and personal assets to their five children.Of the five -- four daughters and one son -- only their son, Kurt, was interested in running the family's two Southampton, N.Y., clothing stores.Kurt, who was selling software to retail stores in Seattle, solved half the problem by opting to return home. In May, he bought Billing's Lingerie on Main Street.
NEWS
October 2, 2002
Eleanor B. Dopman, an officer of a family-owned millwork business, died Saturday of a heart attack at Franklin Square Hospital Center. She was 84 and lived in Timonium. She was a former Homeland resident. Until she retired about 12 years ago, she worked in claims services at Blue Cross and Blue Shield in Towson. She also did the accounting for several family-owned businesses, including Church House Inc., a church-building firm; Dopman Millwork Corp. on Eastern Avenue; and Elton Construction Co. Born Eleanor Bernard in Baltimore and raised on East 22nd Street, she was a 1936 Eastern High School graduate.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
John Ostrowski, a renowned Southeast Baltimore sausage maker who refused to sell his product to supermarkets for wider distribution, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Somerford Place Assisted Living in Columbia. The Lutherville resident was 72. "As soon as you step through the front door of 524 S. Washington St., it hits you: the spicy, smoky, garlicky and altogether unmistakable smell of tradition," said a 2005 Baltimore Sun article about Mr. Ostrowski and his family business, Ostrowski's Famous Polish Sausage.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Growing up, when Alex Pownall watched his father, he saw a man who loved his job. John Pownall has served 20 years in the military, the last 12 as a recruiter for the Maryland National Guard. He was sent to defend Andrews Air Force Base after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and advised the Afghan National Army in 2011 and 2012. "He looked forward to drill, and he came home happy," Alex Pownall said. So when Alex turned 17 last year, he needed no convincing. He joined the Maryland National Guard in October and is waiting to finish high school so he can go to boot camp.
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