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By Marie-Claude Lavoie | February 21, 2013
This month marks the 20th anniversary of the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act. The 1993 act is a federal law requiring employers to provide employees 12 weeks of unpaid leave for qualified medical and family reasons, including pregnancy. On this anniversary, we should reflect on how the U.S. is unacceptably lagging behind on parental leave and on what we should do to overcome this gap. Researchers at McGill University's Institute for Health and Social Policy compared policies across the globe and found that among the 173 countries studied, five did not offer any paid parental leave.
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NEWS
By Marie-Claude Lavoie | February 21, 2013
This month marks the 20th anniversary of the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act. The 1993 act is a federal law requiring employers to provide employees 12 weeks of unpaid leave for qualified medical and family reasons, including pregnancy. On this anniversary, we should reflect on how the U.S. is unacceptably lagging behind on parental leave and on what we should do to overcome this gap. Researchers at McGill University's Institute for Health and Social Policy compared policies across the globe and found that among the 173 countries studied, five did not offer any paid parental leave.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 20, 2002
WASHINGTON - A divided U.S. Supreme Court struck down yesterday a federal rule that penalized employers for failing to inform workers of their rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act. The Labor Department rule was aimed at employers who don't tell workers on leave that the time will count against the 12 weeks of guaranteed leave under federal law. The rule gave those employees an additional 12 weeks off. Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, writing for...
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN and CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN,NEWSDAY | April 19, 2006
I work for a private company that links merit raises to attendance. I feel my employer unfairly penalized me for a three-month leave I took to recover from a serious illness. I went out under the Family and Medical Leave Act, and the company maintained my benefits and my job. But I lost a substantial portion of a merit raise for 2005, and I'm wondering if the company made a mistake. I thought that between the FMLA and my stellar record, I would get the full merit raise. Am I right? I don't think so. Timing is key. If you had earned the full merit raise before your time off under the Family and Medical Leave Act, the company couldn't have legally reduced it simply because you didn't have perfect attendance.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Since its enactment three years ago, the Family and Medical Leave Act has allowed employees leave to care for a newborn, a sick relative or for their own serious illnesses without placing a heavy burden on employers, according to a report released to Congress yesterday by a bipartisan commission.The law, which guarantees up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave, had come under fire before its passage from some businesses that said it amounted to an unneeded government intrusion that would cost them dearly in time and money.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | January 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Anticipating strong support from Bill and Hillary Clinton, congressional advocates of family and children's issues said yesterday they expect there will be "a new, family-friendly Washington" in 1993.With Congress convening today, they predicted swift enactment of the Family and Medical Leave Act and more money for children's immunizations, the Head Start preschool program and other services."I really think we've got a chance of getting some momentum" and making children "a power issue," declared Rep. Patricia Schroeder, D-Colo.
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN and CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN,NEWSDAY | April 19, 2006
I work for a private company that links merit raises to attendance. I feel my employer unfairly penalized me for a three-month leave I took to recover from a serious illness. I went out under the Family and Medical Leave Act, and the company maintained my benefits and my job. But I lost a substantial portion of a merit raise for 2005, and I'm wondering if the company made a mistake. I thought that between the FMLA and my stellar record, I would get the full merit raise. Am I right? I don't think so. Timing is key. If you had earned the full merit raise before your time off under the Family and Medical Leave Act, the company couldn't have legally reduced it simply because you didn't have perfect attendance.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | August 22, 2004
My husband and I are adopting a child from Russia. We don't have definite travel dates yet, but could get the word within the next few weeks. Once we bring our child home, I would like to take a leave of eight to 12 weeks. What rights do I have as an employee of a small firm? I believe the Family and Medical Leave Act applies only to companies with at least 50 employees. Ours is much smaller. My boss doesn't seem receptive to my suggestions, such as letting me work from home or hiring a temp to cover for me. What happens if I leave?
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 8, 1996
BOSTON -- I hate to say ''I told you so.'' After all, most of the time, a simple ''Nyaah, nyaah'' will do the trick. But today I feel like trilling James Carville's book title: ''We're Right, They're Wrong.''What brings about this attack of gloating is a report just released on the Family and Medical Leave Act, the law passed during the first hopeful weeks of the Clinton administration. It guarantees up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to full-time workers in companies with 50 or more employees who need to care for their parents, their spouses, their newborn or newly adopted children, their sick children or themselves.
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | February 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In its latest report card on Congress, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce gives failing marks to most Maryland legislators.But some lawmakers say it's the chamber's rating system that needs improvement, not their voting records.The chamber examined how members voted in 1990 on selected issues affecting business. Expressed in percentages, the scores reflect how often lawmakers voted for the chamber's position.Maryland House members scored from 21 to 74, with Rep. Kweisi Mfume, D-7th, at the bottom and Rep. Helen D. Bentley, R-2nd, at the top. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | August 22, 2004
My husband and I are adopting a child from Russia. We don't have definite travel dates yet, but could get the word within the next few weeks. Once we bring our child home, I would like to take a leave of eight to 12 weeks. What rights do I have as an employee of a small firm? I believe the Family and Medical Leave Act applies only to companies with at least 50 employees. Ours is much smaller. My boss doesn't seem receptive to my suggestions, such as letting me work from home or hiring a temp to cover for me. What happens if I leave?
NEWS
By Jan C. Greenburg and Jan C. Greenburg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - Forcefully rejecting stereotypes about the roles of men and women as caregivers, the Supreme Court refused yesterday to exempt states from a federal law that authorizes employees to sue for back pay if they are denied a leave of absence to care for a sick family member. In an opinion by Chief Justice William Rehnquist, the court turned away arguments by Nevada officials that states were immune from lawsuits by employees under the Family and Medical Leave Act. The court said that the law was passed to address historic gender bias in granting leave for family emergencies and that Congress' strong interest in addressing sex discrimination trumps any states' rights concerns.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 20, 2002
WASHINGTON - A divided U.S. Supreme Court struck down yesterday a federal rule that penalized employers for failing to inform workers of their rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act. The Labor Department rule was aimed at employers who don't tell workers on leave that the time will count against the 12 weeks of guaranteed leave under federal law. The rule gave those employees an additional 12 weeks off. Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, writing for...
NEWS
By Pete du Pont | February 1, 2000
BALTIMORE -- Our unemployment insurance system needs to be reformed. Although most employers pay a payroll tax on all their workers for the purpose, only 38 percent of the unemployed get benefits. Furthermore, the system is subject to abuse, and economists agree that the benefits encourage the jobless to stay unemployed longer. But rather than reform the unemployment insurance system to fix these problems, the Clinton administration wants to put it in the family leave business. The president wants to let parents of newborn or newly adopted children draw unemployment insurance benefits while they're on leave.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 1999
PETERBOROUGH, N.H. -- Touching on an anxiety that troubles many working parents -- the difficulty of raising children while also having a fulfilling work life -- former Sen. Bill Bradley proposed yesterday that federal dollars and streamlined state programs be used to ease the strain.Lamenting that "the global economy just doesn't care about the 6: 30 dinner hour," the Democratic presidential hopeful suggested ways that his administration would improve the lives of working parents.He proposed allocating $2.6 billion for various programs, including money to improve child care, an expansion of the popular Family and Medical Leave Act to cover more businesses and provide longer leaves, and $400 million more a year for community colleges.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 20, 1996
BOSTON -- My friend has had another attack of the political rants. She comes down with them at least once every four years -- the way a golfer comes down with the shanks. Only her rants tend to fly straight down the middle of the campaign fairway.Her subject today is what she calls women's terminal gratitude: Too many women regard presidential candidates the way they regard their husbands.Every time their husband changes a diaper in the middle of the night, they say thank you. Every time a candidate tips his hat in the general direction of work and family issues, they blush with sheer delight at being noticed.
NEWS
By Deborah Walker | September 21, 1992
THE Family and Medical Leave Act, which may have been vetoed by President Bush by the time you read this, would increase discrimination against women by employers.The legislation would force companies with 50 or more employees to grant up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to female employees for having a child, and to male or female employees to care for a sick child, spouse or parent.Businesses would have to retain the employee's health-care benefits over that period and guarantee that he or she would be able to come back to the same or a comparable job at the end of 12 weeks.
NEWS
By Christopher Kirkpatrick and Christopher Kirkpatrick,Capital News Service | March 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Republican Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett has voted consistently for small-business interests, unlike Democratic Reps. Benjamin L. Cardin and Kweisi Mfume, according to a recent report by the the National Federation of Independent Business.The report rated Congress members on key votes cast during 1993 and early 1994.Eight votes were studied for House members; 13 for senators.Among the issues surveyed last week by the group -- the largest small-business federation in the country -- were family and medical leave, tax increases and deficit reduction, and property rights.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 8, 1996
BOSTON -- I hate to say ''I told you so.'' After all, most of the time, a simple ''Nyaah, nyaah'' will do the trick. But today I feel like trilling James Carville's book title: ''We're Right, They're Wrong.''What brings about this attack of gloating is a report just released on the Family and Medical Leave Act, the law passed during the first hopeful weeks of the Clinton administration. It guarantees up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to full-time workers in companies with 50 or more employees who need to care for their parents, their spouses, their newborn or newly adopted children, their sick children or themselves.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Since its enactment three years ago, the Family and Medical Leave Act has allowed employees leave to care for a newborn, a sick relative or for their own serious illnesses without placing a heavy burden on employers, according to a report released to Congress yesterday by a bipartisan commission.The law, which guarantees up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave, had come under fire before its passage from some businesses that said it amounted to an unneeded government intrusion that would cost them dearly in time and money.
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