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Falun Gong

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NEWS
February 19, 2002
Followers of Falun Gong, an exercise and meditation ritual, will discuss and demonstrate the practices of their group at 7 p.m. today in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. Falun Gong, which started in China in 1992, is practiced by millions in 40 countries, including the United States. An active group meets in Baltimore. The popular practice is under attack by the Chinese government, and practitioners are being persecuted, said Larry Wu, a Western Maryland College associate professor of philosophy and religious studies.
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NEWS
By Yuwei Zhang | July 13, 2014
Marching in an Independence Day Parade is not supposed to be a gut-wrenching experience, but for me last weekend in Philadelphia, it was. Don't get me wrong; I love playing my waist drum, in my waist-drum troupe. It's just that July 4th always triggers memories of the day I left behind my husband and child in China, to escape to America. I recall secretly wiping away my tears so that my mom wouldn't see the depth of my sadness. I told my 1-month-old daughter, who was fast asleep, "I promise you a bright future, but for now, mommy has to leave you here in China.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 1999
BEIJING -- Nearly 1,000 members of the spiritual movement Falun Gong held a two-day demonstration inside government headquarters in a southern Chinese city last week, a human rights organization reported yesterday.Undeterred by a recent crackdown on Falun Gong in Beijing, where China's leaders appear alarmed by the size, organization and secretive nature of the movement, the demonstrators entered the inner courtyard of Communist Party headquarters in Nanchang, the capital of Jiangxi province, Tuesday and Wednesday.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 7, 2008
BEIJING - Every morning these past several months, I was reminded that, for the first time in Olympic history, China is poised to win more medals than any other nation. Each time I walked down my stairs, in fact, I was reminded. It was in plain view, right on my wall. Not an exact medal count, but an unavoidable symbol. Last fall, on an earlier visit to Beijing, I was greeted outside my hotel by a Chinese college student. Like most people I've met here, he was exceedingly gracious and friendly.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 7, 1999
BEIJING -- Before a television audience of millions, retired Communist Party member Liu Shuwen confessed her sins against the state this week as thousands have done before her.A middle-aged woman with salt-and-pepper hair, she told how she had helped Li Hongzhi, head of the now-banned Falun Gong spiritual movement, direct more than 10,000 members to surround the capital's Zhongnanhai leadership compound in April."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 23, 1999
BEIJING -- Displaying growing anxiety about the boldness and influence of a spiritual group whose membership rivals that of the Chinese Communist Party, the government here officially banned Falun Gong yesterday, continued to round up its members and portrayed the group on state-run radio as a crazed cult. In recent days, police have detained at least 10,000 Falun Gong practitioners in 14 cities around the country, according to the Hong Kong-based Information Center of Human Rights and Democratic Movement in China.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 29, 1999
BEIJING -- It was a stunning moment for the Chinese leadership.Dressed in drab provincial clothes and carrying copies of their leader's manifesto, about 10,000 members of the Falun Gong meditation sect slipped into the capital in April and staged the biggest anti-government demonstration in a decade.In an act that no one seemed to have anticipated, the crowd of mostly middle-aged disciples sat cross-legged in lotus positions outside the vermilion walls of the Zhongnanhai leadership compound, silently protesting the detention of fellow members and asking for official recognition.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 4, 2001
SHANGHAI, China - At least 10 followers of the banned Falun Gong spiritual movement were reported yesterday to have died at a labor camp in northeast China last month, either in a group suicide or from torture. The Hong Kong-based Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy said 10 women killed themselves to protest their treatment at the Wanjia labor camp outside Harbin in Heilongjiang province. But the Falun Gong Web site, based in the United States, was quick to denounce that report, saying that 15 women at the camp had been tortured to death and that the camp had labeled their deaths suicides to cover up its crime.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 2001
BEIJING - Six people affiliated with the prestigious Qinghua University have been sentenced to prison for downloading material from the banned Falun Gong spiritual movement from the Internet and passing it along, a human rights group said yesterday. In a decision handed down by the Beijing First Intermediate Court on Dec. 13, the six were given prison sentences of three to 12 years, according to the group, the Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy, which is based in Hong Kong.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2001
The meditation and exercise practice called Falun Gong can lead to arrest and prison in China. But it is said to have quite the opposite result in the United States, where a small but growing number of immigrant parents say it's helping kids stay out of trouble. Concerned about violence, casual sex and drugs in American culture, they see Falun Gong as a way to keep their sons and daughters on the straight and narrow. Children are receiving instruction in small, informal groups at a Howard County park, in a rented Silver Spring elementary school cafeteria and elsewhere.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 22, 2006
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- Chinese President Hu Jintao told an audience at Yale University yesterday that China's rapid economic development is not a threat to the United States and that the two countries' shared strategic interests should inevitably make them partners. Yale was his last stop on a four-day visit to the United States meant to quell Washington's concerns about China's growing trade surplus and increased political muscle, as well as to build business ties. His speech to an audience of about 600 students and professors was also broadcast live in China except for a brief question-and-answer session in which Hu was queried about whether China views the United States as an ally or adversary, and if China's economic development comes at the cost of political rights.
NEWS
By PAUL RICHTER and PAUL RICHTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Chinese President Hu Jintao promised President Bush long-term economic reforms yesterday but offered no immediate concessions on the trade and security issues that threaten the two countries' relationship. Hailed with a 21-gun salute on a sunlit White House lawn, Hu declared that China was committed to overhauling gradually the export-driven economy that has piled up a $202 billion trade surplus with the United States and brought calls in Congress for protectionist retaliation.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2005
BEIJING - The defection of a senior Chinese diplomat in Australia who claims he helped oversee a vast spy network has cast a spotlight on China's espionage activities at a time of increased global trade tensions and concern over Beijing's military spending. Chen Yonglin, the first secretary of the Chinese Consulate General in Sydney, chose a particularly embarrassing moment to go public against his employer - a rally last month in Australia marking the 16th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 2004
NEW YORK - Cendana Wirasari Adiwarga sat perfectly still, her eyes shut tight as Quincy Sun dragged a toothpick soaked with fake blood across her plump left cheek. "There, all done," Sun said, appraising her handiwork. Adiwarga's smooth skin had been transformed into a garish tableau of bloody cuts and bruises. Adiwarga then rose to take her place inside a metal cage, where she planned to sit for three hours on a blustery late October morning opposite a federal courthouse in Lower Manhattan.
NEWS
By Riley McDonald and Riley McDonald,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 2004
BOSTON - Liberals, conservatives, anarchists, fundamentalists, peace-seekers and war supporters all found reason and space to protest in Boston this week - but peacefully, and in relatively small numbers. "From the get-go we had expectations of the worst and that hasn't happened," said David Estrada, a Boston police spokesman. "We've been very fortunate." Local, state and federal law enforcement officials convened on Boston with riot gear and crowd control training in anticipation of massive, rowdy protests.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
Before 9 / 11, China's rise was the most important international story on the planet. China is home to the world's largest population, 1.3 billion people. It has one of Earth's fastest growing economies and at least 30 long-range nuclear missiles. Ambitious leaders in Beijing envision becoming Asia's indispensable power. While Iraq and terrorism preoccupy the United States, China continues a steady climb that could force a redrawing of the world's geopolitical map. Now Communist in name only, China is an unwieldy hybrid: an increasingly market-driven economy overseen by an authoritarian regime awash in corruption.
NEWS
November 1, 1999
REAL problems confront China. Getting into the World Trade Organization is one. Dealing with millions of unemployed in the cities is another. Staying connected to the growth of national sentiment on Taiwan is still a third. Nothing undermines confidence in the regime of Ziang Jemin more than its choice of the problem to seize by the throat. That is Falun Gong, the ubiquitous movement of exercise and mediation. It is no real danger to the regime, but a distraction of Beijing's choosing.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 4, 1999
BEIJING -- An intensifying crackdown against the banned Falun Gong movement has sent its practitioners under cover and led Chinese authorities to schedule a rare news conference in Beijing's Great Hall of the People today to explain why they consider the group so dangerous.The repression could become a serious irritant in U.S.-China relations, a Western diplomat warned. Already, he said, "Falun Gong has become a bigger deal than Taiwan" for China's government.Its leaders consider demonstrations by the popular movement's followers a brazen and at least symbolically serious challenge to the Communist Party's authority.
NEWS
September 9, 2003
Sharon begins visit to India, a longtime ally of Palestinians NEW DELHI, India - Ariel Sharon began a landmark visit to India yesterday, intent on cementing defense deals and fortifying his country's friendship with a longtime Palestinian ally during the first visit here by an Israeli prime minister. Pakistan, India's neighbor and chief rival, immediately warned of the "dangerous consequences" of a military alliance between Israel and India, knowing that Sharon hopes to seal the $1 billion sale of an advanced airborne radar package.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 27, 2002
BEIJING - The world's leading psychiatric association voted yesterday to send a delegation of experts to China to look into charges that Chinese psychiatric hospitals are being used to silence political and religious dissidents. Officials of the World Psychiatric Association, which is meeting in Yokohama, Japan, said that Chinese health officials had been cooperative. A preliminary fact-gathering delegation is scheduled to travel to China next spring. But the resolution fell far short of steps proposed by human rights advocates and some psychiatrists, who insist that systematic psychiatric abuses in China are rampant, perhaps even more severe and widespread than they were in the former Soviet Union.
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