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False Claims Act

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
When Maxim Healthcare Services settled one of the government's largest-ever medical fraud cases last week, the Medicaid and Veterans Affairs contractor agreed to pay $150 million and implement a host of corporate reforms. But Maxim, a Columbia-based home health and medical staffing company founded by Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, avoided the penalty that would have the biggest impact on its bottom line: disbarment from federal health care programs. That's the case with nearly all of the companies ever charged with cheating government programs — including thousands of health care companies that are defendants in most of the cases and that settled civil charges for a record $2.5 billion in the 2010 fiscal year.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
A federal court has dismissed a case against a rehabilitation hospital owned by the University of Maryland Medical System that was accused of diagnosing patients with a rare malnutrition-related disorder to collect bigger Medicare and Medicaid payments. The federal government filed a $8.1 million lawsuit in U.S. District Court against Kernan Hospital last year, saying the West Baltimore facility manipulated its computer system to show that patients suffered from kwashiorkor, a disease most typically found in impoverished regions.
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BUSINESS
January 26, 2010
A one-time Baltimore-based military health services contractor will pay $2.2 million to settle allegations that it over-billed the federal government and filed false claims in a double-payment profit scheme, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office of Maryland. Under the federal False Claims Act, Sierra Military Health Services LLC, a subsidiary of Sierra Health Services, Inc., was accused of submitting false claims for payment from the Tricare Management Activity, which operates under the Defense Department.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
When Maxim Healthcare Services settled one of the government's largest-ever medical fraud cases last week, the Medicaid and Veterans Affairs contractor agreed to pay $150 million and implement a host of corporate reforms. But Maxim, a Columbia-based home health and medical staffing company founded by Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, avoided the penalty that would have the biggest impact on its bottom line: disbarment from federal health care programs. That's the case with nearly all of the companies ever charged with cheating government programs — including thousands of health care companies that are defendants in most of the cases and that settled civil charges for a record $2.5 billion in the 2010 fiscal year.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
A federal court has dismissed a case against a rehabilitation hospital owned by the University of Maryland Medical System that was accused of diagnosing patients with a rare malnutrition-related disorder to collect bigger Medicare and Medicaid payments. The federal government filed a $8.1 million lawsuit in U.S. District Court against Kernan Hospital last year, saying the West Baltimore facility manipulated its computer system to show that patients suffered from kwashiorkor, a disease most typically found in impoverished regions.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
For years, the family business has been a source of respect and wealth for the Kanes. As a leader in the commercial moving industry, John M. Kane nurtured business and political connections in Montgomery County and Annapolis, and led the Maryland Republican Party during Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s tenure as governor. But as his wife, Mary D. Kane, runs for lieutenant governor with Ehrlich, John Kane is trying to keep himself and the Kane Co. out of the political crossfire. That's because Kane is defending the business in a lawsuit that alleges federal contract fraud.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | September 17, 2011
Something didn't look right. Maxim Healthcare nurses were showing up at Richard West's house according to one schedule. But Maxim was billing the government according to another. West complained to the state: The company was charging for hundreds of hours of work it never did. Officials blew him off, he said. He alerted Medicaid, the state and federal program that paid for his care. Nothing happened. He told a social worker. She expressed concern, but did nothing. But West, a Vietnam vet with muscular dystrophy, kept pushing and pushing, building a giant, accusatory snowball that landed last week — eight years later — on Maxim's Columbia headquarters.
NEWS
By Daniel W. Whitney | January 29, 2010
Billions of dollars are lost each year nationally to fraudulent Medicare and Medicaid claims. If only legitimate claims were paid, the savings could help pay for health care reform. The federal government has been unable to effectively police against such fraud - but private citizens can make a difference. A federal law known as the False Claims Act (FCA) has been on the books since the Civil War era. Originally designed to combat false claims submitted to the Union Army, the FCA applies to false or fraudulent medical claims submitted to the federal government for payment.
NEWS
April 9, 2010
Maryland is on the verge of enacting a state false claims act allowing whistleblowers and the state to target those entities ripping off state health programs. Maryland would be the 26th state to enact such a false claims act. Overall, false claims acts are an unqualified success in helping to detect fraud and recover money falsely claimed against government programs. False claims acts on the national and state levels have recovered more than $20 billion since 1986. Opponents have argued that Maryland doesn't need a law and that the federal false claims act would suffice.
NEWS
By Sidney Rocke | March 7, 2007
By failing to enact a false claims act, our state is missing an important safeguard against fraud and waste of taxpayer dollars. The federal government has had its False Claims Act, or FCA, in place since the Civil War - when the Union Army realized it was being swindled by unscrupulous contractors who were supplying lame mules, yet charging for healthy animals. In a reaction to what we would today call blatant rip-offs, Congress passed a law allowing the government to respond to these false claims by seeking triple damages and additional hefty penalties.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | September 17, 2011
Something didn't look right. Maxim Healthcare nurses were showing up at Richard West's house according to one schedule. But Maxim was billing the government according to another. West complained to the state: The company was charging for hundreds of hours of work it never did. Officials blew him off, he said. He alerted Medicaid, the state and federal program that paid for his care. Nothing happened. He told a social worker. She expressed concern, but did nothing. But West, a Vietnam vet with muscular dystrophy, kept pushing and pushing, building a giant, accusatory snowball that landed last week — eight years later — on Maxim's Columbia headquarters.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
For years, the family business has been a source of respect and wealth for the Kanes. As a leader in the commercial moving industry, John M. Kane nurtured business and political connections in Montgomery County and Annapolis, and led the Maryland Republican Party during Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s tenure as governor. But as his wife, Mary D. Kane, runs for lieutenant governor with Ehrlich, John Kane is trying to keep himself and the Kane Co. out of the political crossfire. That's because Kane is defending the business in a lawsuit that alleges federal contract fraud.
NEWS
By Daniel W. Whitney | January 29, 2010
Billions of dollars are lost each year nationally to fraudulent Medicare and Medicaid claims. If only legitimate claims were paid, the savings could help pay for health care reform. The federal government has been unable to effectively police against such fraud - but private citizens can make a difference. A federal law known as the False Claims Act (FCA) has been on the books since the Civil War era. Originally designed to combat false claims submitted to the Union Army, the FCA applies to false or fraudulent medical claims submitted to the federal government for payment.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2010
A one-time Baltimore-based military health services contractor will pay $2.2 million to settle allegations that it over-billed the federal government and filed false claims in a double-payment profit scheme, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office of Maryland. Under the federal False Claims Act, Sierra Military Health Services LLC, a subsidiary of Sierra Health Services, Inc., was accused of submitting false claims for payment from the Tricare Management Activity, which operates under the Defense Department.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
A Northwest Baltimore nursing care center has agreed to pay $827,000 to the federal government to settle allegations that it improperly billed Medicare numerous times for room and board charges not covered by the program.Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital Inc. had been the target of an investigation begun under the the False Claims Act, the federal government's primary weapon in fighting fraud and waste in the health care industry, prosecutors said yesterday."Since 1994, we have recovered over $30 million utilizing the False Claims Act to attack health care fraud in Maryland," said Kathleen McDermott, an assistant U.S. attorney in Baltimore who coordinates such cases.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 15, 1992
NEW YORK -- A former employee of a military contractor in upstate New York was awarded $7.5 million yesterday by a federal judge for bringing forward evidence that the company had systematically defrauded the Pentagon in the 1980s.The award, made to Christopher M. Urda, 35, an auditor from Binghamton, N.Y., is the largest to date under a federal law that was revised in 1986 to encourage whistle-blowers to come forward with allegations of wrongdoing by government contractors.U.S. District Judge Con Cholakis in Albany made the award to Mr. Urda as part of an agreement calling for the contractor and its current and former owners to pay the government $55.9 million to settle civil charges that the company had overbilled the Pentagon on more than $1 billion worth of contracts.
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