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By Michael Hill | October 31, 1991
If Yogi Berra were a TV critic, he would say ABC's "False Arrest" is deja vu all over again.It was just last Tuesday that we saw a blond-haired former series star tormented by a variety of darker-complexioned inmates while serving an unjust prison term. Sunday night you get to see it again.In the first one, it was Cheryl Ladd, framed on a drug rap in CBS' "Locked Up: A Mother's Rage" that eventually became a polemic on incarceration causing the sins of the mother to be visited upon her kids.
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By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Baltimore's spending panel approved a $63,000 payment Wednesday to settle a police brutality lawsuit filed by a woman shocked with a Taser in 2012. The lawsuit concerns the events of April 30, 2012, when Ashley Overbey called Baltimore police to report an attempted burglary at her home. According to documents presented to the Board of Estimates by the city solicitor's office, Overbey got into a "verbal confrontation" with one of the officers at her home. The officer accused her of pushing him, and attempted to arrest her. Overbey alleges the officer pulled her hair and began hitting her, the documents state.
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By Jonathan Storm and Jonathan Storm,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 1, 1991
It's the sweetest voice on the best-dressed suspect to turn up in a true-crime TV drama in a long time:"I have a home and a family," says Donna Mills innocently to police officers. ". . . How can you think that someone like me would be involved in a murder?"Ms. Mills' character, Joyce Lukezic, is missing the point. The police don't care whether she's involved in a murder or not: They need someone to convict, and she looks like an excellent prospect.The title takes some of the suspense out of ABC's "False Arrest," which airs in two-hour segments Sunday and Wednesday beginning at 9 each night (Channel 13)
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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore's spending panel is asked to approve a $40,000 settlement on charges that city officers falsely arrested a man and committed assault and battery against him at his Glen Oaks apartment. Alex Dickson, the plaintiff in the case, received significant injuries to his teeth, nose and ribs after three officers came to his apartment on Aug. 13, 2010 with his girlfriend under the terms of a protective order so she could retrieve some personal items. When the group arrived, Dickson used his body to block Officer James Wilder from crossing the threshold when Wilder grabbed Dickson and placed him under arrest, according to the settlement memo presented to the Board of Estimates.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Dennis O'Brien and Jamie Smith and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
A federal jury yesterday awarded $80,000 to a Baltimore woman who was accused of writing a bad check at Paramount's Kings Dominion, was locked up for a night and spent almost a year preparing for trial before charges were dropped.A U.S. District Court jury in Greenbelt deliberated two days before awarding Stephanic P. Austin $40,000 in compensatory damages for deprivation of her civil rights, false arrest and malicious prosecution. The jury awarded $40,000 in punitive damages against Paramount Parks, which owns the Virginia amusement park, for withholding evidence for nearly a year that someone else had been charged.
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By Ann LoLordo | April 6, 1991
A Baltimore jury awarded $1 million yesterday to a former University of Maryland scientist after concluding that two colleagues falsely accused him of stealing computer data from a Baltimore laboratory in 1988.The Circuit Court jury, after hearing three weeks of testimony, decided that the allegations by Anthony Sestokis and Philip J. Krause led to the false arrest of Robert W. Thatcher, the former head of the Applied Neuroscience Institute at the university's Eastern Shore campus. The three men worked together at a special clinical service that Mr. Thatcher helped to establish at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore.
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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1996
A man who had a run-in with an Anne Arundel County police officer last December has filed a $2.4 million negligence lawsuit in Anne Arundel Circuit Court against the county, the police department and the officer.Russell Wayne Varner of the 200 block of Grisdale Hill in the Riva area alleges that Officer Sonny M. Pentz of the Southern District grabbed him without provocation on Dec. 20, 1995, while he was standing outside his home, hit him on the back and then shoved him into a police car, causing him to injure his back.
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By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
It seemed like it would be a routine stolen vehicle report. Joseph Lyle walked outside his West Baltimore home a little more than a year ago, couldn't find his Chevy van and called the police. But by the end of the day, Lyle, then 69, was arrested by an officer who didn't believe his story and sent to jail for 28 hours. This week, a Baltimore jury awarded Lyle $1 million after finding the patrol officer, Y. W. Kim, responsible for false arrest and false imprisonment. The award comes after the city paid out $3.5 million last year and $5 million in 2004 in judgments and settlements connected with lawsuits against the Baltimore Police Department.
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By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
A Baltimore Circuit Court jury has awarded $25,000 to a man who accused city police of battery and false arrest during a traffic stop three years ago.In a case before Circuit Judge Wanda K. Heard, jurors determined late Thursday that Stanley F. Shields of the 4600 block of Hawksbury Road in Pikesville was wrongfully arrested on charges of disorderly conduct Oct. 12, 1996.Police officials declined to comment because the department does not discuss cases in litigation.Shields had stopped his car in the 1700 block of N. Carey St. about 5 a.m. to ask two pedestrians for directions, according to court records and his attorney, Matthew Bennett.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
The former Severna Park Elementary School principal who was charged with being a marijuana kingpin, only to have the charges later dropped, is suing Anne Arundel County officials for $3 million, claiming false arrest, malicious prosecution and civil rights violations.Patricia A. Emory claims in the lawsuit, filed this week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, that county police barged into her home Oct. 29, 1992, under the authority of a search warrant obtained through "gross exaggerations, deliberate lies and inconsistencies."
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
The city's spending panel on Wednesday approved a $72,000 payout to three family members who accused Baltimore police of assaulting and falsely arresting them outside of a Federal Hill bar. The Board of Estimates voted to award the money to Rony, Ronnie and Eileen Reyes to settle a $99 million suit brought against the police department after a 2010 incident at Mad River Bar & Grille. On Oct. 16, the Reyes family went to the bar and stayed there until closing time, according to board documents.
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By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
A Baltimore Circuit Court jury on Tuesday awarded $95,000 to a man who had sued city police alleging that his arrest in April 2009 was unwarranted, according to his attorney. Tyron Decarlos Satchell, 18, had sought $1 million in punitive and an additional $4 million in compensatory damages against officers Frederick E. Murray, Christopher Warren and John Potter, all assigned to the Southwest District. According to his lawsuit, the three plainclothes officers confronted Satchell as he sat on the front porch of his home in the 1700 block of Poplar Grove St. The suit says the officers ordered some young men who were there off the porch, demanded their identification cards and "told them to sit on the ground.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
A man who was arrested and charged with raping a woman in Charles Village, then released from custody 14 months later after forensic evidence failed to link him to the victim, is suing the Baltimore Police Department, alleging false arrest. The sweeping $10 million lawsuit filed on behalf of 46-year-old Marlow Humbert in U.S. District Court names current and former police commanders and mayors, as well as several of the arresting officers, and alleges that a pervasive culture tolerating mass arrests and public hysteria over the attacks led to his detention.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
Norman Christopher Usiak was in a hurry. The attorney from Frederick had briefs to file, and in the rush, he couldn't remember where he put his wallet. He was wearing dark pants and a white T-shirt, an un-lawyerly ensemble a police officer described as "looking disheveled. " It was 4:10 in the afternoon and the Maryland Court of Appeals building in Annapolis closed in 20 minutes. The regular bailiffs had gone home, replaced by a police officer for the Maryland Department of General Services, which runs and secures state office buildings.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 27, 2007
In the quest for public safety, law enforcement officials in Baltimore put a cloud over innocent people - and left it there. Maryland Del. Keith E. Haynes found a way to push the cloud aside. His effort, successful after two years, might have broad significance. For several years, the 44th District delegate, a Democrat, had heard disturbing stories from constituents. Thousands of people were being arrested in Baltimore for loitering and other minor offenses, thrown in jail and then released without a trial.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun Reporter | April 3, 2007
The Fraternal Order of Police has dropped its objections to a bill that would automatically expunge the criminal records of those who are arrested but not charged with a crime, Senate leaders said, removing some of the strongest reservations about the measure in the General Assembly. The FOP had opposed a provision of the bill that would have made it easier for people to sue the police over such arrests. Under current law, those who are arrested but not charged can petition for expungement, but to do so they must either sign a waiver promising not to sue the police for false arrest or other claims arising from the incident, or wait three years, when the statute of limitations for such actions expires.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
The infamous raid of The Block that brought more discredit to the state police than it did to Baltimore's seedy red-light district got a day of criticism in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday, where two women are suing for false arrest and civil rights violations.Laura Beth Wolff, who had been a dancer, claims police never identified themselves when they barged into the Mouse Trap lounge with guns drawn Jan. 14, 1994, causing her to stumble down stairs and fracture her right ankle. She was never charged, and her injuries caused her to have a miscarriage three days later, she claimed.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
It seemed like it would be a routine stolen vehicle report. Joseph Lyle walked outside his West Baltimore home a little more than a year ago, couldn't find his Chevy van and called the police. But by the end of the day, Lyle, then 69, was arrested by an officer who didn't believe his story and sent to jail for 28 hours. This week, a Baltimore jury awarded Lyle $1 million after finding the patrol officer, Y. W. Kim, responsible for false arrest and false imprisonment. The award comes after the city paid out $3.5 million last year and $5 million in 2004 in judgments and settlements connected with lawsuits against the Baltimore Police Department.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2003
A veteran Baltimore police officer was placed on administrative duties yesterday after a brief internal hearing into allegations that she falsely arrested an 18-year-old man on drug charges last week, police officials said. Jacqueline Folio, 41, who joined the department in 1989, will be transferred from the Southeastern District to juvenile detention duties pending the outcome of the agency's internal disciplinary process, police officials said. Folio, who also lost her police powers, could not be reached for comment.
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