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By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
Police located a missing 11-year-old boy who was last seen in the 7000 block of Fieldcrest Road in Fallstaff on Tuesday night. Roland Deontrae Henry (pictured) is 4-foot-11 and 102 pounds. He was wearing a black short-sleeve polo shirt, khaki pants and black and white flip-flops when he went missing around 7:20 p.m., according to a police news release. Authorities said Wednesday morning that he had been located "safe and unharmed. " Anyone with information may call the Missing Persons Unit at 443-984-7385.
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NEWS
By Tim Swift and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
A man was shot multiple times and killed and two others were wounded by gunfire late Saturday in Northwest Baltimore, Baltimore police said. About 10:20 p.m. Saturday, officers found three men suffering from gunshot wounds in the 7000 block of Fieldcrest Road in the Fallstaff section of the city, police said. The three men were taken to a local hospital, where one of the victims died early Sunday morning. The other victims — a 31-year-old man and a 18-year-old man — are expected to survive, police said.
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NEWS
By Tim Swift and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
A man was shot multiple times and killed and two others were wounded by gunfire late Saturday in Northwest Baltimore, Baltimore police said. About 10:20 p.m. Saturday, officers found three men suffering from gunshot wounds in the 7000 block of Fieldcrest Road in the Fallstaff section of the city, police said. The three men were taken to a local hospital, where one of the victims died early Sunday morning. The other victims — a 31-year-old man and a 18-year-old man — are expected to survive, police said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
Police located a missing 11-year-old boy who was last seen in the 7000 block of Fieldcrest Road in Fallstaff on Tuesday night. Roland Deontrae Henry (pictured) is 4-foot-11 and 102 pounds. He was wearing a black short-sleeve polo shirt, khaki pants and black and white flip-flops when he went missing around 7:20 p.m., according to a police news release. Authorities said Wednesday morning that he had been located "safe and unharmed. " Anyone with information may call the Missing Persons Unit at 443-984-7385.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
Arnold Bennett "Arnie" Cushing, co-founder of a computer software company that specializes in serving the restaurant industry, died Sunday of complications from Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 58. Mr. Cushing was born and raised in Norwood, Mass., where he graduated from Norwood High School in 1970. He earned a bachelor's degree in zoology in 1974 from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and later earned a master's degree in computer engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
November 1, 1993
TC Sometimes, neighbors have to agree to disagree.After 15 months writing this column, Intrepid Commuter has found no more convincing evidence of this than the experience of Louis M. Schlimer, a retired optician living in Northwest Baltimore.Mr. Schlimer lives on Fallstaff Road. It's a residential street that extends east from Park Heights Avenue.He has no problem driving from Park Heights to his home. But for Mr. Schlimer to get from his home to Park Heights, he can't drive Fallstaff. He must drive a circuitous route through the neighborhood.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 2001
Most homebuyers would not put "walking time" at the top of their priority list when selecting a neighborhood. But many people have chosen Fallstaff as their home for that very feature. For the past 15 years, Orthodox Jewish families, whose faith prohibits them from driving on the Sabbath, have been picking this community because they can easily walk to synagogue. "People want to live within a 20- to 30-minute walk," said Aryeh Goetz, homeownership director of Comprehensive Housing Assistance Inc., better known as CHAI.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2004
Exactly four weeks ago yesterday, a Mexican grill replaced a failed kosher restaurant on Reisterstown Road near Seven Mile Lane. Mari Luna Mexican Grill - named after the Mexican-born owner's wife - is the latest sign of the growing ethnic diversity along Northwest Baltimore's Park Heights Avenue and Reisterstown Road corridors, from Belvedere Avenue to the county line. Jews and African-Americans are the dominant population groups, but Russians and Caribbeans have a substantial presence.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2004
The killing of three children in the Fallstaff neighborhood of Baltimore yesterday shocked and scared many residents, leading some to reconsider their perception of the area as a quiet, safe enclave apart from urban ills. The Art Deco apartment complex is on the southern edge of a leafy neighborhood of mature trees and well-tended homes. Though largely Orthodox Jewish, the community is a mix of white, black and Hispanic residents. `A tragedy' "Anything involving the death of three children is a tragedy," said Rabbi Rex Perlmeter of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, which lies a few blocks north along Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2005
The rows of shelves that line Fallstaff Elementary School's library are half-bare, with stuffed animals serving as placeholders in spots where there are no books. But to Principal Faith Hibbert, the shelves appear half-full. For much of the past school year, there was not a single library book at Fallstaff Elementary, which recently converted from a middle school and did not have money to stock its library with elementary-age reading materials. Now, because of a partnership between Fallstaff and CHAI, the community development agency of Associated Jewish Charities, there are 2,000 new books -- ranging from encyclopedias to Spanish-language storybooks -- on the library's shelves.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
Arnold Bennett "Arnie" Cushing, co-founder of a computer software company that specializes in serving the restaurant industry, died Sunday of complications from Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 58. Mr. Cushing was born and raised in Norwood, Mass., where he graduated from Norwood High School in 1970. He earned a bachelor's degree in zoology in 1974 from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and later earned a master's degree in computer engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2005
The rows of shelves that line Fallstaff Elementary School's library are half-bare, with stuffed animals serving as placeholders in spots where there are no books. But to Principal Faith Hibbert, the shelves appear half-full. For much of the past school year, there was not a single library book at Fallstaff Elementary, which recently converted from a middle school and did not have money to stock its library with elementary-age reading materials. Now, because of a partnership between Fallstaff and CHAI, the community development agency of Associated Jewish Charities, there are 2,000 new books -- ranging from encyclopedias to Spanish-language storybooks -- on the library's shelves.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2004
Exactly four weeks ago yesterday, a Mexican grill replaced a failed kosher restaurant on Reisterstown Road near Seven Mile Lane. Mari Luna Mexican Grill - named after the Mexican-born owner's wife - is the latest sign of the growing ethnic diversity along Northwest Baltimore's Park Heights Avenue and Reisterstown Road corridors, from Belvedere Avenue to the county line. Jews and African-Americans are the dominant population groups, but Russians and Caribbeans have a substantial presence.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2004
The killing of three children in the Fallstaff neighborhood of Baltimore yesterday shocked and scared many residents, leading some to reconsider their perception of the area as a quiet, safe enclave apart from urban ills. The Art Deco apartment complex is on the southern edge of a leafy neighborhood of mature trees and well-tended homes. Though largely Orthodox Jewish, the community is a mix of white, black and Hispanic residents. `A tragedy' "Anything involving the death of three children is a tragedy," said Rabbi Rex Perlmeter of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, which lies a few blocks north along Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
Obidio Villalta's face is the definition of bewilderment as he sits on a couch in his newly purchased three-bedroom townhouse and tries to make sense of a letter from his mortgage company. The Spanish-speaking Villalta has learned little English since moving here more than a decade ago from El Salvador. "It's a little scary. I don't know what it is," Villalta says of the letter, smiling and slowly putting his words together in English. A neighborhood organization helped Villalta, his wife, Ana, and their two young children overcome the language barrier as they bought a $75,000 home on Midheights Road and became pioneers of sorts: They are believed to be the first Latino family to buy a home in Northwest Baltimore's Fallstaff community.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 2001
Most homebuyers would not put "walking time" at the top of their priority list when selecting a neighborhood. But many people have chosen Fallstaff as their home for that very feature. For the past 15 years, Orthodox Jewish families, whose faith prohibits them from driving on the Sabbath, have been picking this community because they can easily walk to synagogue. "People want to live within a 20- to 30-minute walk," said Aryeh Goetz, homeownership director of Comprehensive Housing Assistance Inc., better known as CHAI.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
Obidio Villalta's face is the definition of bewilderment as he sits on a couch in his newly purchased three-bedroom townhouse and tries to make sense of a letter from his mortgage company. The Spanish-speaking Villalta has learned little English since moving here more than a decade ago from El Salvador. "It's a little scary. I don't know what it is," Villalta says of the letter, smiling and slowly putting his words together in English. A neighborhood organization helped Villalta, his wife, Ana, and their two young children overcome the language barrier as they bought a $75,000 home on Midheights Road and became pioneers of sorts: They are believed to be the first Latino family to buy a home in Northwest Baltimore's Fallstaff community.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1996
Holding back tears, Sally Gelfembeim, 70, scurried around the burned and soaked remains of her two-bedroom apartment in Northwest Baltimore yesterday, picking up two-inch thick Russian-English dictionaries, novels and maps she and her husband brought to the United States 10 months ago from their native Moscow."
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1996
Holding back tears, Sally Gelfembeim, 70, scurried around the burned and soaked remains of her two-bedroom apartment in Northwest Baltimore yesterday, picking up two-inch thick Russian-English dictionaries, novels and maps she and her husband brought to the United States 10 months ago from their native Moscow."
NEWS
November 1, 1993
TC Sometimes, neighbors have to agree to disagree.After 15 months writing this column, Intrepid Commuter has found no more convincing evidence of this than the experience of Louis M. Schlimer, a retired optician living in Northwest Baltimore.Mr. Schlimer lives on Fallstaff Road. It's a residential street that extends east from Park Heights Avenue.He has no problem driving from Park Heights to his home. But for Mr. Schlimer to get from his home to Park Heights, he can't drive Fallstaff. He must drive a circuitous route through the neighborhood.
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