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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
The first thing Maryland State Trooper John Peach does when asked about the dangers of flying medical helicopters is to take out his cell phone with a picture of his wife, Kate, and 2-year-old daughter Elizabeth. He held up the image for me as he prepared his 38-foot Dauphin craft for his next call while parked in a hangar at Martin State Airport this week. He readily acknowledges that after the crash last September that killed two of his friends, pilot Stephen H. Bunker and Trooper Mickey C. Lippy, along with a volunteer emergency medical technician and a patient, in heavy fog in Prince George's County, he's a bit more wary of going out. "It was a little difficult at first," he told me. Peach told me that his daughter, even at such a young age, points to the sky every time a helicopter soars overhead.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | May 2, 2014
 Two firefighters, a police officer and a marine rescue volunteer - all of whom died over the past year -- will be honored Friday when Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium hosts its 29th annual Fallen Heroes Day commemoration. The 1 p.m. ceremony honors those whose deaths have been declared "line of duty" since May 2013. The event salutes police and correctional officers, firefighters, emergency medical and rescue personnel in Maryland. Those being remembered are: Firefighter/EMT Gene Kirchner of the Reisterstown Volunteer Fire Company, who died on May 2, 2013, eight days after he was critically injured while fighting a house fire and attempting to rescue a resident of the building.
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NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | May 5, 1991
They gathered to honor and remember.Yet the hundreds of people, who came together Friday to honor five firefighters -- including former Manchester resident John N. Plummer -- who perished in the line ofduty, also gathered to draw inspiration."
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 21, 2013
Two murals painted by Bel Air High School art students honoring five Harford County Sheriff's Office deputies who died in the line of duty were presented to Sheriff Jesse Bane on Wednesday afternoon. The students and their teacher, Karen Ballard, joined with Bane and other members of his agency on the front steps of the Sheriff's Office headquarters in Bel Air for the unveiling the 4-by-6 foot murals. Ballard and Deputy First Class Shawn Forton, a recognized mural artist, worked with the 12 students, in grades 10 through 12, who painted the murals over the past several months as a class project.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2001
Joan Schwenz and Michael Cowdery never doubted that their sons would be buried among heroes. Schwenz and Cowdery were among hundreds who gathered at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium yesterday at the 16th annual Fallen Heroes Day ceremony, where they honored 11 police officers and firefighters who died in the line of duty in the past year Schwenz's stepson, Queen Anne's County Sheriff's Deputy Jason C. Schwenz, was fatally shot Feb. 13 when...
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1998
Nancy Christine Hardesty, an Edgewater child-care provider and crossing guard, was remembered yesterday at a Timonium ceremony honoring public safety workers killed in the line of duty as "the rock" of her family.The 13th annual Fallen Heroes Day at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens and Mausoleum also honored Tfc. Raymond Gerard Armstead Jr., killed in a traffic accident while serving out of the Forestville Barracks, and Baltimore police Lt. Owen Eugene Sweeney, Jr., whose death shocked the city when a bullet fired through a door took his life.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2004
A bill meant to reap millions from Baltimore's many cell phone users was introduced last night at a City Council meeting, where members also approved a tax break for a much smaller group: widows and widowers of fallen police officers, firefighters and rescue workers. Two years after a plan to tax cell phone service died amid stiff industry opposition, the council is considering such a levy again. Councilwoman Catherine E. Pugh introduced the bill, which was referred to the Taxation Committee.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2001
First you see the memorial with its relief of a firefighter and a police officer rising like an altar on the green lawn. Then you notice flower vases marking the graves. Some blooms are fresh: pink, yellow, white, the cellophane still around them. Others are dry reedy stalks that whisper the connections between living and dead. As you look across the cemetery, the lawn seems to rise and fall ever so slightly like a feathered quilt. Geese fly toward the pond. There is new growth on the oak trees.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | May 4, 1995
Maryland's monument to its fallen heroes stands at the foot of a gently sloping hill in an oasis of green grass and trees, next to a bright blue lake where swans and wild ducks swim.The Fallen Heroes Memorial at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium is for those police officers and firefighters who lost their lives in the line of duty. Fourteen law officers and nine firefighters have been buried there since the memorial was dedicated in 1976."They are ours forever, their deeds are woven into our lives forever," reads a bronze plaque at the foot of the memorial.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2003
In the story of his life, John W. Armiger Jr. is a reluctant star. He's not one to mention that he was made an honorary fire chief in Baltimore County this week or how generous he has been to families across Maryland touched by tragedy. If you met him, he probably wouldn't tell you that he and his father are one of the major reasons there is a state memorial in a Timonium cemetery to firefighters and police officers killed in the line of duty. Armiger would be sure to tell you, however, about the Fallen Heroes monument at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens where a memorial service was held yesterday, as it always is on the first Friday of May. But he would play down his own importance in either one. "This is a way we can give back to those who protect us nationally and locally," Armiger said after being coaxed into talking about his role in honoring Maryland's fallen heroes.
NEWS
By Ellie Kahn, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Families stood in solidarity as a wreath was placed at Maryland's Fallen Heroes Memorial on Friday in honor of police and firefighters killed in the line of duty. This year, the 27th annual memorial to Maryland's public safety workers honored Maryland State Trooper 1st Class Shaft S. Hunter, among others. Hunter died last year in a traffic accident. "There are so-called heroes in sports, and then there are heroes in life," said Baltimore Ravens coach John Harbaugh to those gathered at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
The first thing Maryland State Trooper John Peach does when asked about the dangers of flying medical helicopters is to take out his cell phone with a picture of his wife, Kate, and 2-year-old daughter Elizabeth. He held up the image for me as he prepared his 38-foot Dauphin craft for his next call while parked in a hangar at Martin State Airport this week. He readily acknowledges that after the crash last September that killed two of his friends, pilot Stephen H. Bunker and Trooper Mickey C. Lippy, along with a volunteer emergency medical technician and a patient, in heavy fog in Prince George's County, he's a bit more wary of going out. "It was a little difficult at first," he told me. Peach told me that his daughter, even at such a young age, points to the sky every time a helicopter soars overhead.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 5, 2007
So after the list of Maryland's fallen heroes was read yesterday at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens, the Hereford High School Chamber Choir did indeed sing "You'll Never Walk Alone." And the young ladies and gentlemen did so splendidly. The girls looked fetching in their black gowns, the boys absolutely elegant in their black tuxedos. The choir's rendition of the song was superb. I just wondered if anyone else caught the irony of "You'll Never Walk Alone" being sung at a fallen heroes ceremony in which David McGuinn was one of the honorees.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun Reporter | September 10, 2006
The year after New York City firefighter Terence A. McShane died at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, Christine Kellar decided to write a song about her brother-in-law. The lyrics came in bursts over about three weeks, prompted by memories of McShane's smile, his easygoing manner and his dedication to his family. In New York one evening in 2002, during an impromptu family sing-along, Kellar put the words to music, but she said she wasn't ready to do much of anything else with her song.
SPORTS
By David Steele | August 12, 2005
IT WAS big, almost as big as the girl waving it over her head. It was bright orange with black lettering, and it read, "Welcome Back Raffy." It was held aloft behind the Orioles' dugout about two hours before the first pitch at Camden Yards last night, and it was the first sign, no pun intended, that things were back to normal. Rafael Palmeiro had returned, he had finally spoken (but on the advice of my attorney, I can't tell you what he said), and he was embraced, at least by those who got to the ballpark early enough for batting practice.
NEWS
By Danny Jacobs and Danny Jacobs,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
Frank Micriotti boarded a plane in May for the first time since 1976. It was a small commuter plane, with rows of three seats divided by a narrow aisle. "I said to myself, `Man, this is crazy,'" he said, recalling his nervousness about traveling on the aircraft. "And I'm by myself, and no one is next to me to give me reassurance." If Micriotti needed peace of mind, he could remember the reason for his flight, a cause inspired by the death of a stranger five years ago. As part of his effort to secure breaks on property tax for the spouses of fallen police officers and firefighters across the nation, Micriotti embarked on a 20-day, cross-country trip to thank the lawmakers who took up the effort and to encourage them to see it through.
NEWS
June 24, 2004
State detention of incompetents isn't appropriate The incarceration in a mental hospital of someone who has been found mentally unfit to stand trial on any criminal charges after those charges have been dismissed was wrong ("Safeguards broke down as disabled man suffered," June 20). Detaining a presumably innocent criminal defendant because of his incompetence to stand trial, when there will never be a trial, is deplorable. And in any event, detention for six years in these circumstances for someone charged with petty shoplifting is utterly outrageous.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - What do you suppose they'll say about the war hero's parents? After all, those who defend the present administration against charges of misinformation and misdirection have never been above a little character assassination where its critics are concerned. Their favorite tactic is to shout down dissent by yelling "Unpatriotic!" whenever it rears its head. So what will they say about the war hero's folks? Surely they'll have to say something. In interviews with The Washington Post published last week, Mary Tillman and Patrick Tillman Sr., parents of slain Army Ranger Pat Tillman, blasted the Army for "lying" about their son's death.
NEWS
June 24, 2004
State detention of incompetents isn't appropriate The incarceration in a mental hospital of someone who has been found mentally unfit to stand trial on any criminal charges after those charges have been dismissed was wrong ("Safeguards broke down as disabled man suffered," June 20). Detaining a presumably innocent criminal defendant because of his incompetence to stand trial, when there will never be a trial, is deplorable. And in any event, detention for six years in these circumstances for someone charged with petty shoplifting is utterly outrageous.
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