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By Mary Gail Hare | May 9, 2009
Several hundred officers, their families and friends attended the Baltimore County Police Department's annual memorial service Friday in Towson. They laid wreaths at a stone monument at the Towson Courthouse Plaza and shared memories of fallen officers. Many said they come every year and this time they wore large buttons that read "Fallen but not Forgotten." "Mainly, this is a service for those we loved and will never forget," said Lynne Parry, whose husband, Mark F. Parry, died in the line of duty seven years ago. "It is comforting to know that 100 years from now, this county will still call out his name and remember."
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NEWS
Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
EMMITSBURG - Family after family took the solemn walk Sunday to receive an American flag and red rose, each pausing for a moment to feel the nation's gratitude for their loved ones, fallen firefighters who died in the line of duty. Among the 107 first responders honored at the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service were two from Maryland: Gene Meir Kirchner, 25, of Reisterstown and David R. Barr Jr., 64, of Port Deposit. "For us, it's just another step in our journey of mourning," said Kirchner's sister, Shelly Brezicki of Hampstead.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | October 7, 2006
FAWN GROVE, PA. -- Donald Androsky, who served three Army combat tours in Vietnam and spent a year helping families of fallen soldiers, remembers an era of poorly attended funerals, raging anti-war demonstrations and anger toward returning veterans. Decades later, with the nation waging war in Iraq, he takes consolation that much has changed. "It was not like today, when thousands come out to honor a fallen soldier," said Androsky, 68, a retired Harford County planner. "At least now, veterans are not getting hostile receptions when they come home."
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Getting a flag from the federal government wouldn't have provided much consolation for the family of the U.S. Postal Service employee who was shot to death last year on his route in Prince George's County. But June Barnette, a great-uncle of Tyson Barnette, says a flag would have been a welcome gesture of respect for the 26-year-old letter carrier, whose death sparked a national debate about the safety of after-hours mail delivery. "I feel deep in my heart that it would have been appreciated," said Barnette, who lives in South Carolina, where his great-nephew grew up. "Ain't nothing like that going to hurt.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 29, 2002
Wood from its fallen limbs was turned into gavels for Maryland judges, and the state Department of General Services is seeking public proposals on how best to use the remmants of the 460-year-old Wye Oak, which was toppled by a storm in June. The Department of Natural Resources previously gathered ideas on how to salvage the remains of the official state tree. General Services is seeking proposals on how to implement them as part of the Wye Oak Commemorative Project. Proposals for using the remains are requested in one or more of five categories: education and public outreach; research and preservation; artwork and furniture; pieces of fine crafts and woodworking; and souvenirs and memorabilia.
NEWS
September 15, 2000
The Howard County Police Foundation will be host of the ninth "Police Pace 2000" on Sunday in Centennial Park to help raise money for the families of fallen officers. The event will begin at 8 a.m. and is to feature a 5-kilometer race and a one-mile fun run. The cost is $15 a person and $25 a family. Proceeds will go to a scholarship program to offer a college education to the children of Howard County police officers killed or seriously injured in the line of duty. Organizers expect up to 1,000 participants, and each will receive a T-shirt and a chance to win a mountain bike, Orioles tickets, free dinners and other prizes.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 2, 2004
FRIDAY'S Nightline -- the one Maryland-based Sinclair Broadcast Group goofily denounced as "motivated by a political agenda to undermine the efforts of the United States in Iraq" and refused to air on its ABC-affiliated television stations -- was titled, "The Fallen," and somewhere Paul Fussell must have been amused. To Fussell -- professor emeritus of English literature at the University of Pennsylvania, skilled curmudgeon, connoisseur of irony, grand essayist on matters of war and culture -- anything in modern media called "The Fallen" would hark back to a bygone age of high diction and reality-masking euphemisms, and essentially would glorify war. In Fussell's seminal work, The Great War and Modern Memory, he presents a list of the noble and poetic language that once lived in Europe and supposedly died in the mustard clouds of World War I -- danger was "peril," the enemy "the foe," to die was "to perish," and the dead were "the fallen."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 16, 1998
It's been assayed that Denzel Washington is the Cary Grant of this generation, but a more apt comparison may be James Stewart. Grant, after all, was the sum of some wonderfully charming parts, whereas Stewart's impact, the way he combined nobility and likability, was deeper and more ineffable. Since his forcible performance as Malcolm X in 1992, Washington has become the American actor most able to personify goodness without sappiness or superiority.Still, even Washington's welcome presence is not enough to save "Fallen," yet another spiritual allegory from Hollywood dealing with God, Satan and the presence of angels.
NEWS
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2005
After launching plans in 1997 to build a monument that would pay tribute to the state's fallen emergency workers, the Maryland Fire-Rescue Services Memorial Foundation was flooded with donations. But permits and other obstacles slowed the group's progress, and the projected cost quickly outpaced the foundation's initial budget, leaving the tiny nonprofit once again to raise funds. To gather the $250,000 still needed to break ground, the cash-strapped foundation has organized benefit events at local bars and taverns - hoping to provide a good time while collecting small donations, one $10 cover charge at a time.
NEWS
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2005
After launching plans in 1997 to build a monument that would pay tribute to the state's fallen emergency workers, the Maryland Fire-Rescue Services Memorial Foundation was flooded with donations. But permits and other logistics slowed the group's progress, and the projected cost quickly outpaced the foundation's initial budget, leaving the tiny non- profit once again to raise funds. To gather the $250,000 still needed to break ground, the cash-strapped foundation has organized benefit events at local bars and taverns -- hoping to provide a good time while collecting small donations, one $10 cover charge at a time.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Goucher's season could have ended literally and metaphorically on April 14 when sophomore midfielder Matthew Gabriel died of injuries he suffered during a hit-and-run the day before. But once he had the backing of the Gabriel family, coach Brian Kelly knew the campaign would go on. What he was uncertain of was whether the same could be said about the team. “Immediately following with the Catholic game [on April 17], we were purely playing off of emotion and energy,” he recalled.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
The speakers at the annual Memorial Day ceremony at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens had finished, the rifle team had fired its volleys and the musicians had begun to pack up. Vincent Krepps stood by the stone that bears the name of his twin brother. There is no grave under the marker. Richard Krepps went missing in Korea more than 60 years ago; the Chinese government says he died in a prison camp near the Yalu River in 1951. Vincent Krepps, who enlisted with his brother in 1949, has tried since then to get the U.S., Chinese and North Korean governments to bring his remains home.
NEWS
BY MATT BUTTON | May 12, 2014
Bike riders with the Police Unity Tour stopped at the Harford County Sheriff's Office Southern Precinct in Edgewood Sunday morning, as part nationwide ride that culminated in Washington, D.C., Monday at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial. The national ride, which had an estimated 1,700 participants from around the country, is organized to raise awareness of the sacrifices police officers make, particularly those who died in the line of duty. May 15 is National Peace Officers Memorial Day, as proclaimed by President John F. Kennedy in 1962, and the week in which that day falls is celebrated as National Police Week.
NEWS
Staff Reports | May 2, 2014
 Two firefighters, a police officer and a marine rescue volunteer - all of whom died over the past year -- will be honored Friday when Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium hosts its 29th annual Fallen Heroes Day commemoration. The 1 p.m. ceremony honors those whose deaths have been declared "line of duty" since May 2013. The event salutes police and correctional officers, firefighters, emergency medical and rescue personnel in Maryland. Those being remembered are: Firefighter/EMT Gene Kirchner of the Reisterstown Volunteer Fire Company, who died on May 2, 2013, eight days after he was critically injured while fighting a house fire and attempting to rescue a resident of the building.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
After learning his son had been shot to death while serving a warrant at a Catonsville home, Officer Jason Schneider's father found comfort in knowing his son had died doing something that mattered. Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz recalled speaking with Schneider's father, Charles, at Maryland Shock Trauma Center shortly after Schneider was pronounced dead Aug. 28. "2013 has been a particularly difficult year for Baltimore County," Kamenetz said, speaking to officials from police and fire departments across the state who came to honor four men at the annual Fallen Heroes Day ceremony held at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium on Friday.
BUSINESS
From Baltimore Sun Staff Reports | April 13, 2014
In recent years, Maryland has seen many local banks acquired by out-of-state rivals. A little over a decade ago, the state had 139 banks based here, with 20 of them separately chartered affiliates of Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust Co., according to the Maryland Bankers Association. Here are a few of Baltimore's most prominent banks that have been bought up over past three decades. Provident Bank (1886-2008) Provident, which had been based in Baltimore since the late 1800s, had long prided itself on its independence.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 13, 2005
ON SUNDAY'S anniversary of the terrorist attacks, the ringing of the telephone interrupts a tender reverential moment. I am watching the National Football League offer patriotic pre-game tribute to the fallen of Sept. 11, 2001. It's always stirring to see such gentleness displayed for 30 seconds by the NFL before its young gladiators throw forearms into each other's windpipes. But now comes the phone call. "You should come down here," the voice says. It's my wife. "I'm watching a tribute to the fallen," I explain.
NEWS
By Theodore G. Venetoulis | November 22, 2013
There's not much left to be said about John Kennedy. I can't say I really knew him. But I did meet him a few times, and on the last occasion, he actually called me by name (good staff work, I'm sure). There weren't many Maryland politicians who backed his presidential candidacy in those early primaries. The dominant Tawes-Hocker machine opposed him. One of his most enthusiastic supporters was Jerry Hoffberger, who owned both the National Brewing Company and the Baltimore Orioles.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Sal Conaboy spoke so softly that the reporters surrounding him had to lean forward to hear. Maryland had just lost, 20-3, to Syracuse on Saturday, and the Terps ' starting center was sitting in the Gossett Football Team House auditorium and trying to piece together how the team lost for the fourth time in five games. "It's hard to win games when you don't do your job up front," said Conaboy, a junior who has started every game this year. There was plenty of blame to go around for Maryland, which had four turnovers.
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