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By PETER A. JAY | June 28, 1992
Havre de Grace. -- Although hardly anyone in this part of the world paid much attention, a significant little anniversary has just slipped by. It was ten years ago this month that the British, after a short but bloody and extremely difficult little war, repossessed the Falkland Islands from Argentina.The conflict was confusing for some United States policy-makers when it was taking place, and it still tends to be dismissed today as a relatively minor incident. But it offers several vivid andvaluable lessons both for nations and for individuals, and is worth a backward look by Americans trying to make sense of a strange and unfocused election campaign.
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NEWS
April 17, 2013
Regarding the recent article, "Argentine leader not on list for Thatcher funeral" (April 12), it seems logical that to me Great Britain did not invite Cristina Fernandez, the president of Argentina to Margaret Thatcher's funeral. The news item, however, labels this "a snub likely to deepen a diplomatic dispute over the Falkland Islands. " This is a perfect example of how the daily news media misleads the public. In fact, President Fernandez is actively encouraging the newly appointed Pope Francis, a fellow countrymen and ironically her former political enemy, to stir up the whole Falkland Islands dispute with the United Kingdom all over again.
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 21, 1992
LONDON -- The American military historian Edward Luttwak has ignited a small flame of controversy here on the 10th anniversary of the Falklands War (April 2-June 14, 1982) by suggesting that Britain would have been better off to have lost.He also touched on the ever-sensitive issue of class.Defeat by Argentina in the South Atlantic, Dr. Luttwak says, would have delivered the shock necessary to force Britain to reassess its basic values, a process he believes is necessary.Argentina gained from the war, he writes.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | September 3, 1995
What has kept Cal Ripken playing baseball without interruption since the middle of the Falklands War -- May 30, 1982 -- is that since then he has never come to the ballpark on a day when the Orioles had anyone who could play shortstop better than he can. Even if he didn't enjoy playing, which he does, he would do it anyway, every day, because that is what responsible grown-ups do: their jobs.So, is it worrisome that many Americans think that what Ripken has done is exotic, even weird?What he has done is work so regularly that on Wednesday he will cruise past Lou Gehrig's record of 2,130 consecutive games, heading for 2,500 (in late April 1998, if you plan to be there)
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | September 3, 1995
What has kept Cal Ripken playing baseball without interruption since the middle of the Falklands War -- May 30, 1982 -- is that since then he has never come to the ballpark on a day when the Orioles had anyone who could play shortstop better than he can. Even if he didn't enjoy playing, which he does, he would do it anyway, every day, because that is what responsible grown-ups do: their jobs.So, is it worrisome that many Americans think that what Ripken has done is exotic, even weird?What he has done is work so regularly that on Wednesday he will cruise past Lou Gehrig's record of 2,130 consecutive games, heading for 2,500 (in late April 1998, if you plan to be there)
NEWS
April 17, 2013
Regarding the recent article, "Argentine leader not on list for Thatcher funeral" (April 12), it seems logical that to me Great Britain did not invite Cristina Fernandez, the president of Argentina to Margaret Thatcher's funeral. The news item, however, labels this "a snub likely to deepen a diplomatic dispute over the Falkland Islands. " This is a perfect example of how the daily news media misleads the public. In fact, President Fernandez is actively encouraging the newly appointed Pope Francis, a fellow countrymen and ironically her former political enemy, to stir up the whole Falkland Islands dispute with the United Kingdom all over again.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | February 6, 1994
Santa Fe, Argentina.-- I try to return often to this town where I lived when I first came to Latin America nearly 30 years ago, for the perspective: It encourages me to re-examine some of the elements of my point of view.There is a small plaza in Santa Fe with an aviary called the park of the pigeons. The park has benches, a statue of a mother and child, a garden in the shade of an immense tree. Now and then pigeons rise out of the aviary, circle the plaza then reascend. The sound of their wings is metronomic.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1982: Great Britain wins Falklands war1982: Barney Clark receives an artificial heart ...1983: ... He dies after 112 daysPub Date: 12/08/99
FEATURES
By Kevin Crust | November 2, 2007
The images that open Shane Meadows' deeply personal, politically charged drama This Is England begin with cheeky nostalgia, an innocuous collection of 1980s British iconography - grinning Margaret Thatcher photo-ops, primitive video games, Duran Duran, the royal wedding of Charles and Di. The montage then quickly shifts to more potent reflections: the Falklands War, angry clashes between civilians and police, and Thatcher standing cheek by jowl with Ronald...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | February 25, 1991
LONDON -- The drama of British forces actively engaged in the air, land and sea operations as the gulf ground offensive began persuaded Queen Elizabeth II to make her first address to the nation at war since she ascended the throne in 1952.Noting that the British were "rightly proud of our armed forces" and that the allies were facing "a fresh and yet sterner challenge," she said: "I hope that we can unite in praying that their success will be as swift as it is certain and that it may be achieved with as small a cost of human life as possible."
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | February 6, 1994
Santa Fe, Argentina.-- I try to return often to this town where I lived when I first came to Latin America nearly 30 years ago, for the perspective: It encourages me to re-examine some of the elements of my point of view.There is a small plaza in Santa Fe with an aviary called the park of the pigeons. The park has benches, a statue of a mother and child, a garden in the shade of an immense tree. Now and then pigeons rise out of the aviary, circle the plaza then reascend. The sound of their wings is metronomic.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | June 28, 1992
Havre de Grace. -- Although hardly anyone in this part of the world paid much attention, a significant little anniversary has just slipped by. It was ten years ago this month that the British, after a short but bloody and extremely difficult little war, repossessed the Falkland Islands from Argentina.The conflict was confusing for some United States policy-makers when it was taking place, and it still tends to be dismissed today as a relatively minor incident. But it offers several vivid andvaluable lessons both for nations and for individuals, and is worth a backward look by Americans trying to make sense of a strange and unfocused election campaign.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 21, 1992
LONDON -- The American military historian Edward Luttwak has ignited a small flame of controversy here on the 10th anniversary of the Falklands War (April 2-June 14, 1982) by suggesting that Britain would have been better off to have lost.He also touched on the ever-sensitive issue of class.Defeat by Argentina in the South Atlantic, Dr. Luttwak says, would have delivered the shock necessary to force Britain to reassess its basic values, a process he believes is necessary.Argentina gained from the war, he writes.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 5, 1991
LONDON -- British forces returning from the gulf will stage a victory parade, despite initial misgivings by Prime Minister John Major and criticism from a church leader.The bishop of Durham, the Rt. Rev. David Jenkins, denounced the parade plans as "obscene" and warned that the war would become a "disaster" if it led to "triumphalism."Mr. Major, according to sources, decided to back the parade after being convinced it would have the support of all parties and would be a national celebration.
NEWS
January 26, 1999
Lord Lewin, 78, the former British defense chief who masterminded Britain's defeat of Argentina in the Falklands Islands war in 1982, died Saturday of stomach cancer. Lord Lewin is widely regarded as persuading former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher to order the sinking of the Argentine cruiser Belgrano during the 1982 conflict.The Rev. John Osteen, 77, f ounder of one of the largest and most diverse churches in Houston and a popular television pastor, died Saturday in Houston of a heart attack.
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