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By New York Times News Service | December 17, 2007
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Along a seemingly endless row of identical gray warehouses, a lone guard stands watch over a shuttered storage area with a peeling green and yellow sign: Euro Gulf Trading. Three months ago, when the authorities announced that they had seized a large cache of counterfeit drugs from Euro Gulf's warehouse deep inside a sprawling free-trade zone here, they gave no hint of the raid's global significance. But an examination of the case reveals its link to a complex supply chain of fake drugs that ran from mainland China through Hong Kong, the United Arab Emirates, Britain and the Bahamas, ultimately leading to an Internet pharmacy whose American customers believed they were buying medicine from Canada, according to interviews with regulators and drug company investigators in six countries.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 2007
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Along a seemingly endless row of identical gray warehouses, a lone guard stands watch over a shuttered storage area with a peeling green and yellow sign: Euro Gulf Trading. Three months ago, when the authorities announced that they had seized a large cache of counterfeit drugs from Euro Gulf's warehouse deep inside a sprawling free-trade zone here, they gave no hint of the raid's global significance. But an examination of the case reveals its link to a complex supply chain of fake drugs that ran from mainland China through Hong Kong, the United Arab Emirates, Britain and the Bahamas, ultimately leading to an Internet pharmacy whose American customers believed they were buying medicine from Canada, according to interviews with regulators and drug company investigators in six countries.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 16, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The guy goes down to the corner to buy some drugs. He hands over money, and the dealer passes him a bag of what looks like marijuana or cocaine but is actually something else, perhaps parsley or flour.Is the buyer guilty of a crime or innocent?"Guilty," the House of Delegates decided yesterday, passing a bill that would make it a misdemeanor, subject to a $500 fine, a year in jail, or both, "to possess or purchase a non-controlled fTC substance that the person reasonably believes to be a controlled dangerous substance."
NEWS
By PETER J. PITTS | August 15, 2006
Around the world, millions of people are exposed to a real health threat every day - the danger of taking the wrong medication. This spreading problem has nothing to do with patients mixing up their pills. Rather, it's caused by the proliferation of counterfeit drug traffickers, who are profiting immensely from selling fake medicines. To combat this threat, the FDA requires distributors to keep detailed records of the sources of the medications they dispense. But that's a futile undertaking.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
Baltimore police Agent Brian L. Sewell, who was caught in an internal sting operation and convicted by a police panel of planting drugs on a suspect, was officially fired this week from the force, Commissioner Edward T. Norris said yesterday. Norris said at his monthly news conference that he signed the papers terminating Sewell's employment Tuesday. Sewell, a seven-year veteran, was found guilty last month of misconduct in office charges, stemming from allegations that he arrested and planted fake drugs on an innocent teen-ager last year in a park just west of downtown.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2001
Baltimore Police Agent Brian L. Sewell told a police disciplinary panel yesterday that he acted appropriately last year when he charged a teen-ager with possessing drugs that -- unknown to Sewell -- were placed in a city park by Internal Affairs investigators. "I saw what I saw," said Sewell, a seven-year member of the department. "The facts are the facts." Sewell faced his third day of disciplinary proceedings in a case that began at the park and led to his indictment on criminal misconduct and perjury charges.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
The Baltimore Police Department moved yesterday to put one of its biggest embarrassments of the past year behind it by launching proceedings to fire an officer accused of planting evidence on an innocent man. The disciplinary hearing is the latest chapter in a saga that included the indictment of Officer Brian L. Sewell on criminal corruption charges, a break-in at a secret police internal affairs office, city prosecutors' decision to drop the case against...
NEWS
By Capital News Service | October 5, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- Anyone who tries to buy drugs, fake or real, breaks the law, Assistant Attorney General Gary E. Bair argued yesterday before the Maryland Court of Appeals.Margaret L. Lanier, assistant public defender, argued the other view."What is impossible," she said, "is to buy drugs when your seller gives you fake drugs."At issue in the state's highest court was whether a person can be punished for buying illegal drugs when what was purchased was merely a look-alike substance.Peggy Sue Grill was convicted in 1992 of trying to buy heroin in Westminster from an undercover agent that year.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2003
Facing criminal charges of perjury and misconduct, a veteran Baltimore City police officer testified yesterday that she accidentally left out crucial details from court documents in which she claimed to have witnessed a man stash drugs and cash in a bush. The bag contained fake drugs and cash planted at the scene by internal affairs detectives conducting a random integrity sting, which is designed to see whether police officers pocket drugs or money. The trial is scheduled to resume today.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
The Baltimore Police Department moved yesterday to put one of its biggest embarrassments of the past year behind it by launching proceedings to fire an officer accused of planting evidence on an innocent man. The disciplinary hearing is the latest chapter in a saga that included the indictment of Officer Brian L. Sewell on criminal corruption charges, a break-in at a secret police internal affairs office, city prosecutors' decision to drop the case against...
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
When Florida passed a stringent law in 2003 meant to crack down on counterfeit-drug traffickers, those dealing in the illegal trade had to find new homes. At least two of them set up shop in Maryland, funneling fake prescription Procrit, an anti-anemia drug, through shell operations before they were eventually indicted. The state's Board of Pharmacy has no inspector, rarely does background checks, allows distributors to work out of their homes and hands out drug-distribution permits - 722 of them in total - after less scrutiny than that given when licensing beauticians.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Tricia Bishop and Gus G. Sentementes and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2004
Twelve buses filled with Howard County high school students and bound for Canada on a ski trip were detained for up to eight hours at the border last week during a search by Canadian officials that turned up dozens of fake IDs, marijuana and hallucinogenic mushrooms and drug paraphernalia, according to the trip organizer, parents and some of the children. Although not a sanctioned school event, it was another embarrassment for Howard students and school system after a string of incidents since August that included 12 teen-agers being cited for underage drinking at a dance; two girls making national headlines with a kiss; allegations of improper grade changing by top education officials; and a high school forfeiting its games because of ineligible players in various sports.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2003
Facing criminal charges of perjury and misconduct, a veteran Baltimore City police officer testified yesterday that she accidentally left out crucial details from court documents in which she claimed to have witnessed a man stash drugs and cash in a bush. The bag contained fake drugs and cash planted at the scene by internal affairs detectives conducting a random integrity sting, which is designed to see whether police officers pocket drugs or money. The trial is scheduled to resume today.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
Baltimore police Agent Brian L. Sewell, who was caught in an internal sting operation and convicted by a police panel of planting drugs on a suspect, was officially fired this week from the force, Commissioner Edward T. Norris said yesterday. Norris said at his monthly news conference that he signed the papers terminating Sewell's employment Tuesday. Sewell, a seven-year veteran, was found guilty last month of misconduct in office charges, stemming from allegations that he arrested and planted fake drugs on an innocent teen-ager last year in a park just west of downtown.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
A Baltimore police disciplinary panel found Brian L. Sewell guilty yesterday of misconduct stemming from the arrest of an innocent man on drug charges last year. The board recommended that Sewell be fired. Sewell was found guilty of making false statements in police reports and a statement of charges, misleading police and prosecutors, and misconduct in office. Sean R. Malone, head of the department's legal affairs office, said the case was "an important one for the Baltimore Police Department" and showed that police officials were serious about cracking down on bad officers.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2001
Baltimore Police Agent Brian L. Sewell told a police disciplinary panel yesterday that he acted appropriately last year when he charged a teen-ager with possessing drugs that -- unknown to Sewell -- were placed in a city park by Internal Affairs investigators. "I saw what I saw," said Sewell, a seven-year member of the department. "The facts are the facts." Sewell faced his third day of disciplinary proceedings in a case that began at the park and led to his indictment on criminal misconduct and perjury charges.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2001
Brian L. Sewell returned yesterday to the park where his career as a Baltimore police officer unraveled a year ago. He kicked leaves and watched as three of his colleagues examined the area as part of an investigation to decide whether to convict him of misconduct charges. A disciplinary hearing that could result in his firing began Thursday and continued yesterday with a visit to the site where on Sept. 4, 2000, Internal Affairs officers planted a bag of fake drugs to test officers' integrity.
NEWS
By PETER J. PITTS | August 15, 2006
Around the world, millions of people are exposed to a real health threat every day - the danger of taking the wrong medication. This spreading problem has nothing to do with patients mixing up their pills. Rather, it's caused by the proliferation of counterfeit drug traffickers, who are profiting immensely from selling fake medicines. To combat this threat, the FDA requires distributors to keep detailed records of the sources of the medications they dispense. But that's a futile undertaking.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2001
Brian L. Sewell returned yesterday to the park where his career as a Baltimore police officer unraveled a year ago. He kicked leaves and watched as three of his colleagues examined the area as part of an investigation to decide whether to convict him of misconduct charges. A disciplinary hearing that could result in his firing began Thursday and continued yesterday with a visit to the site where on Sept. 4, 2000, Internal Affairs officers planted a bag of fake drugs to test officers' integrity.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
The Baltimore Police Department moved yesterday to put one of its biggest embarrassments of the past year behind it by launching proceedings to fire an officer accused of planting evidence on an innocent man. The disciplinary hearing is the latest chapter in a saga that included the indictment of Officer Brian L. Sewell on criminal corruption charges, a break-in at a secret police internal affairs office, city prosecutors' decision to drop the case against...
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