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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 24, 1999
Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold are two African-American artists who have forged significant reputations, Catlett as a sculptor and Ringgold for an art form she created that combines aspects of painting and quilt making.Their works have been shown from coast to coast in this country and internationally, and are included in leading museum collections. Their art reflects their experience as African-Americans and women, yet has a breadth of appeal that knows no barriers.Since early last year, two major shows, one devoted to each artist, have been on separate national tours: "Elizabeth Catlett Sculpture: A Fifty-Year Retrospective" and "Dancing at the Louvre: Faith Ringgold's French Collection and Other Story Quilts."
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NEWS
January 14, 2005
Exhibit illuminates art, history of quilting The Carroll Arts Center will hold an exhibit, Quilted Memories: Multi-Generational Story Telling in the Tevis Gallery from Monday to Feb. 18. The exhibit will feature a wide variety of quilting styles and techniques, from traditional to abstract designs. In many cultures, quilts record history and unite families, as well as being a source of beauty and warmth. In African-American culture, some slave women made quilts for their masters. With leftover scraps and bits of old clothing, they also made quilts for themselves, both for necessity and to preserve family history.
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FEATURES
By JOHN DORSEY and JOHN DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | February 1, 1999
It's impossible to think of a better pairing of artists than Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold. Two separate one-person shows of their work opened side by side at the Baltimore Museum of Art last week, and they have a chemistry that comes from dealing with the same subject matter in strikingly different but equally impressive ways.Seeing the two of them together is like listening to two great voices sing a duet in which the words are different but the melody unites them. The melody in this case is that both are African-American women whose work deals with being African-American and a woman but, at the same time, has a breadth of appeal that knows no boundaries.
FEATURES
By Janis Campbell and Cathy Collison | February 7, 2000
February is Black History Month. Lots of students will be writing reports and learning about famous African Americans. Here are some books worth checking out: "Women of Hope: African Americans who Made a Difference," by Joyce Hansen (Scholastic, $16.95) is about 13 important women. Some of the names you know -- such as poet Maya Angelou -- but many will be new to you. For example, Septima Poinsette Clark, who lived from 1898 to 1987, was a pioneer teacher for African Americans. She later joined Martin Luther King Jr. in the civil rights movement.
NEWS
February 21, 1999
These books for preschoolers and primary-grade children represent selected titles that pay homage to many aspects of Black History and African-American family life.Picture books* "Barefoot: Escape on the Underground Railroad" by Pamela Duncan Edwards* "Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad in the Sky" by Faith Ringgold* "Charlie Parker Played Be Bop" by Chris RaschkaFiction* "Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt" by Deborah Hopkinson* "Pink and Say" by Patricia Polacco* "Ragtime Tumpie" by Alan Schroeder* "Li'l Sis and Uncle Willie: A Story Based on the Life and Paintings of William H. Johnson" by Gwen Everett* "Can a Coal Scuttle Fly?"
FEATURES
July 14, 1999
"One of my favorite books is `Tar Beach' by Faith Ringgold. It's about an 8-year-old girl named Cassie who imagines she can fly and everything she flies over is hers. I like the book because Cassie reminds me of myself. I often dream of flying free in the air. Especially over an ice cream factory."-- Ashley JacksonLeith Walk Elementary"My favorite book is `Casey at the Bat' by Ernest Lawrence Thayer. It's about a boy named Casey, who is late for his baseball game. When Casey finally gets to the ballpark, the umpire yelled, `You're late kid!
NEWS
January 14, 2005
Exhibit illuminates art, history of quilting The Carroll Arts Center will hold an exhibit, Quilted Memories: Multi-Generational Story Telling in the Tevis Gallery from Monday to Feb. 18. The exhibit will feature a wide variety of quilting styles and techniques, from traditional to abstract designs. In many cultures, quilts record history and unite families, as well as being a source of beauty and warmth. In African-American culture, some slave women made quilts for their masters. With leftover scraps and bits of old clothing, they also made quilts for themselves, both for necessity and to preserve family history.
FEATURES
By Janis Campbell and Cathy Collison | February 7, 2000
February is Black History Month. Lots of students will be writing reports and learning about famous African Americans. Here are some books worth checking out: "Women of Hope: African Americans who Made a Difference," by Joyce Hansen (Scholastic, $16.95) is about 13 important women. Some of the names you know -- such as poet Maya Angelou -- but many will be new to you. For example, Septima Poinsette Clark, who lived from 1898 to 1987, was a pioneer teacher for African Americans. She later joined Martin Luther King Jr. in the civil rights movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 21, 1999
African-American art at BMAFor a look at the spectrum of voices raised by African-American women in the 20th century, view the work of artists Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive at North Charles Street. "Elizabeth Catlett Sculpture: A Fifty-Year Retrospective" and "Dancing at the Louvre: Faith Ringgold's French Collection and Other Story Quilts" are on display Wednesday through April 11. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, until 9 p.m. the first Thursday of each month, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,VILLAGE READING CENTER | February 23, 2000
The story of Harriet Tubman's flight to freedom should be of particular interest to Marylanders: She was born a slave in Bucktown, Md., in about 1820. One of 10 children, Tubman grew up on a plantation where she chopped wood and did field labor until she fled north and joined the secret network of free blacks and sympathizers who helped the runaway slaves escape through the "Underground Railroad." A National Geographic interactive Web site simulates this perilous journey to freedom, asking the user to step into a slave's shoes and make the same difficult choices as the people who risked their lives during Tubman's time.
FEATURES
July 14, 1999
"One of my favorite books is `Tar Beach' by Faith Ringgold. It's about an 8-year-old girl named Cassie who imagines she can fly and everything she flies over is hers. I like the book because Cassie reminds me of myself. I often dream of flying free in the air. Especially over an ice cream factory."-- Ashley JacksonLeith Walk Elementary"My favorite book is `Casey at the Bat' by Ernest Lawrence Thayer. It's about a boy named Casey, who is late for his baseball game. When Casey finally gets to the ballpark, the umpire yelled, `You're late kid!
NEWS
February 21, 1999
These books for preschoolers and primary-grade children represent selected titles that pay homage to many aspects of Black History and African-American family life.Picture books* "Barefoot: Escape on the Underground Railroad" by Pamela Duncan Edwards* "Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad in the Sky" by Faith Ringgold* "Charlie Parker Played Be Bop" by Chris RaschkaFiction* "Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt" by Deborah Hopkinson* "Pink and Say" by Patricia Polacco* "Ragtime Tumpie" by Alan Schroeder* "Li'l Sis and Uncle Willie: A Story Based on the Life and Paintings of William H. Johnson" by Gwen Everett* "Can a Coal Scuttle Fly?"
FEATURES
By JOHN DORSEY and JOHN DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | February 1, 1999
It's impossible to think of a better pairing of artists than Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold. Two separate one-person shows of their work opened side by side at the Baltimore Museum of Art last week, and they have a chemistry that comes from dealing with the same subject matter in strikingly different but equally impressive ways.Seeing the two of them together is like listening to two great voices sing a duet in which the words are different but the melody unites them. The melody in this case is that both are African-American women whose work deals with being African-American and a woman but, at the same time, has a breadth of appeal that knows no boundaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 24, 1999
Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold are two African-American artists who have forged significant reputations, Catlett as a sculptor and Ringgold for an art form she created that combines aspects of painting and quilt making.Their works have been shown from coast to coast in this country and internationally, and are included in leading museum collections. Their art reflects their experience as African-Americans and women, yet has a breadth of appeal that knows no barriers.Since early last year, two major shows, one devoted to each artist, have been on separate national tours: "Elizabeth Catlett Sculpture: A Fifty-Year Retrospective" and "Dancing at the Louvre: Faith Ringgold's French Collection and Other Story Quilts."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 21, 1999
African-American art at BMAFor a look at the spectrum of voices raised by African-American women in the 20th century, view the work of artists Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive at North Charles Street. "Elizabeth Catlett Sculpture: A Fifty-Year Retrospective" and "Dancing at the Louvre: Faith Ringgold's French Collection and Other Story Quilts" are on display Wednesday through April 11. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, until 9 p.m. the first Thursday of each month, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.
FEATURES
September 29, 1999
"Do you like big adventure stories? Well, if you do, read 'The Swiss Family Robinson' by Johann David Wyss. This book is about a family that is shipwrecked and stranded on the beach. The story tells how the family works together to live on the beach. You will see bravery and dreams in this story. It is my favorite."-- Paige GreeneShrine of the Sacred Heart"I think kids should read 'Winnie the Pooh' books by A.A. Milne. The books are bedtime stories told to a boy named Christopher Robin. The stories are about a stuffed bear named Winnie the Pooh and his stuffed animal friends, Piglet, Rabbit, Tigger, Eeyore, Roo, Kanga and Owl. One reason to read Pooh Bear stories is because they are funny.
NEWS
February 7, 1999
ELIZABETH CATLETT has been classed as an African-American artist, a woman artist, a Mexican artist, a sculptor and a printmaker. The operative word for this major figure in North American art, born 84 years ago, is artist.So the 50-year retrospective of her work at the Baltimore Museum of Art may qualify as the annual show of African-American talent and themes for Black History Month that has become a fixture of American cultural institution life. But it is also the exploration of a major artist whose work is found in the BMA's permanent collection.
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