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NEWS
June 23, 1995
Much of what fueled the past year's effort to incorporate Columbia originated in the sometimes insensitive approach taken by the Columbia Association in its relations with the community.Continued evidence of such callousness can be seen in the way the association is handling construction of the $5.2 million Fairway Hills Golf Course. In that case, some unexpected modifications in the course's design angered nearby residents in Wilde Lake.For the larger community, the modifications represent minor tinkering.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
Bob Hedgebeth recently approached a police officer catching speeders with a radar gun and asked if he would follow him home in his patrol car and measure the speed of an airborne golf ball. While the officer politely explained that his apparatus wasn't designed to detect the movement of an object that small, he had a question of his own: How does the Columbia retiree drive balls in his backyard? The answer is simple: Hedgebeth, 73, practices on "The Range," his nickname for golf features he has built under the 100-foot loblolly pines on his 1-acre lot off Route 108 in Beaverbrook.
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NEWS
June 23, 1993
An issue that has been hotly debated, picked at and fussed over for a decade deserves to be resolved. That's true of the federal deficit, and it's true of the proposed new golf course for Columbia.Unfortunately, it appears the bickering will continue until the bitter end -- and perhaps beyond that. Opponents of the planned $5.2 million, 18-hole Fairway Hills course have taken their case to the state Water Resources Administration.At issue is the extent to which building the course will affect trees and the Little Patuxent River.
NEWS
June 28, 2006
Golf -- Hobbit's Glen and Fairway Hills golf clubs in Columbia are open. Patriot Bermuda grass, which requires fewer chemicals and less water to maintain, has been installed at Hobbit's Glen and is to be installed at Fairway Hills. Savings on maintenance will be used to improve other areas of the courses. Fairway Hills, 5100 Columbia Road, 410-730-1112; Hobbit's Glen, 11130 Willowbottom Drive, 410-715-5980, or www.colum biaassociation.org.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Erik Nelson and Adam Sachs and Erik Nelson,Staff Writers | March 1, 1993
Developers are considering building an upscale development and golf course that could expand Columbia's borders and influence the Columbia Council's decision on whether to build a golf course at Fairway Hills.An attorney for the developers approached executives of the nonprofit Columbia Association last week, proposing to form a partnership with the association and county government to build and operate a golf course on part of a 335-acre tract just north of the Village of Harpers Choice, association officials said.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1995
An open message to those golfing motorists on Route 108 (near the intersection of Route 29) in Howard County: Patience, please.Those golfers you may see occasionally are simply getting a preview of the first nine holes of the new Fairway Hills Golf Club. The official opening is set for the weekend of Sept. 2-3, with the second nine expected to open in the spring.The Columbia course is not long by today's standards (four sets of tees giving an 18-hole yardage ranging from 4,454 to 6,206), but it is relatively tight and demanding.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
Golfers playing Howard County's newest course now can head for the traditional 19th hole -- drinks in the clubhouse -- thanks to a decision last night by the Howard County Liquor Board.The five-member panel -- the five Howard County Council members -- approved the sale of beer and wine at the Fairway Hills Golf Course in Columbia despite concerns expressed over the last two months by some nearby residents.The residents felt serving beer and wine will set a bad example for neighborhood children and possibly lead to more errant shots into their back yards.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
The 10-member Columbia Council slightly increased greens fees at two Columbia golf courses last night, a move some council members hope will improve the facilities' profitability.At Hobbits Glen in Harper's Choice village, the fees for a Columbia Association member will increase from $25 to $28 on weekdays and $30 to $34 on weekends.For Columbia residents playing Hobbits Glen, fees will increase from $50 to $55 on weekends and $35 to $38 on weekdays.At Fairway Hills in Dorsey's Search, the fees for a CA member will increase from $16 to $18 on weekdays and $20 to $22 on weekends.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | July 28, 2002
FIRST TEE of Howard County, the program started last summer to make golf more accessible to kids, continues to grow at Columbia's Fairway Hills Golf Course, to the point where an executive director has been named to oversee the work. The man chosen is no stranger to working with kids or to anyone familiar with Howard County sports. He's Don Van Deusen, a Columbia resident who for 32 years has taught physical education and coached in county schools. His "day job" these days is being athletic director at River Hill High School.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
If you ask avid golfer Don Dunn, a well-maintained set of green links is about as wildlife-friendly as you'll see these days in a place frequented by people.Fox, blue herons, geese and other critters thrive in bushes, streams and woods along fairways he's played locally. Reason enough, he says, to build Fairway Hills, an 18-hole, regulation golf course the Columbia Association is proposing for 186-acres of open land that weaves through the village of Dorsey's Search.But critics of the proposal, which heads this week for a round of presentations to residents of the villages of Wilde Lake and Dorsey's Search, say that view is skewed, omitting the serious ecological havoc the golf course would wreak on wetlands, a river and a contiguous woods on the proposed site.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
VETERAN golfer John Moller chuckled as he recounted the head-to-head match 12 months ago in which he became Fairway Hills Golf Course's club champion for a year - but only after gaining his first lead on the 17th hole. "We were scheduled to start at 8 a.m., and Scott [Stoutenborough] was running late - didn't arrive till about 8:05 or so," said Moller, who lives in Marriottsville. "But I waited for him at the first tee. And you know, at the turn, he was 3-up on me. So much for sportsmanship."
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | October 24, 2004
IF YOU didn't know that Don Van Deusen was a retired educator, after listening to him talk about plans for the First Tee youth golf program in Howard County, you'd be able to guess his former occupation. The man who taught physical education, coached and was an athletic director in county high schools for 33 years radiates - over the telephone, no less - enthusiasm about getting back into public schools to promote golf for kids. "We think we're just going to get bigger and bigger," said Van Deusen.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | March 28, 2004
THEY'VE BEEN doing this for more than 20 springs, part of the club's greater mission of promoting and involving people of all ages and skill levels to run. But the Howard County Striders' youth track and field program, which begins Tuesday, is pretty low-key in what seems a really nice way. There are no meets - although kids who participate can enter meets elsewhere if they want to. A few do, and coaches will accompany them. But most don't. No pressure. Because, except for competition at the twice-weekly training sessions, there aren't winners and losers.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | January 25, 2004
A LITTLE of this and a little of that: GOLF: The new No. 2 job of assistant general manager of the Columbia Park and Recreation Association's two golf courses has gone to a familiar name. He's Don Van Deusen, athletic director at River Hill High School and a physical education teacher and coach who has spent 33 years in the county's public school system, 36 in teaching altogether. Van Deusen, who will be retiring from River Hill at the end of this school year, is a familiar face around Hobbit's Glen and Fairway Hills golf courses.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Lem Satterfield and Katherine Dunn and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2003
The girls basketball season is still young, but the top teams in the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference already share something they'd rather not. All of them have been upset at least once, including No. 4 Roland Park's 56-39 win at No. 1 St. Frances, the defending A Conference champions who had been a heavy favorite to go unbeaten in the conference for a second straight season. Roland Park and No. 10 Institute of Notre Dame have both been upset at Notre Dame Prep.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2003
River Hill athletic director Don Van Deusen said yesterday that he plans to retire in July, ending his 33-year career with the Howard County school system. Van Deusen, 58, is retiring so that he can take the position of assistant general manager for the Columbia Association's Fairway Hills and Hobbit's Glen golf courses. He will finish the school year as athletic director and physical education teacher at River Hill, and work his new job on weekends and evenings until school ends. "I enjoy what I'm doing, but it's exciting to try something new," said Van Deusen, an avid golfer who has served as executive director for the First Tee program at Fairway Hills for two years.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2001
Fairway Hills Golf Course in Columbia is poised to become the Maryland centerpiece for an innovative, national instructional program that aims to teach golf to children 8 to 18 who lack financial or other access to courses. By the end of the year, backers plan to have a new addition to the clubhouse at the Columbia Association-owned course as a base for the instruction. Also, they expect to have raised $200,000 in privately generated money - including heavy subsidies from the golf industry - to help underwrite the effort.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2002
This golf course review is by a longtime Columbia resident and frequent golfer who has played virtually every course in Central Maryland. He also is an assistant business editor at The Sun. If you want to work on accuracy in your game, Fairway Hills Golf Club is the place to go. Environmental areas, wetlands, woods and two streams define much of this 6,158-yard, par-70 course, which cuts through several residential areas in the heart of Columbia....
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2003
River Hill athletic director Don Van Deusen said yesterday that he plans to retire in July, ending his 33-year career with the Howard County school system. Van Deusen, 58, is retiring so that he can take the position of assistant general manager for the Columbia Association's Fairway Hills and Hobbit's Glen golf courses. He will finish the school year as athletic director and physical education teacher at River Hill, and work his new job on weekends and evenings until school ends. "I enjoy what I'm doing, but it's exciting to try something new," said Van Deusen, an avid golfer who has served as executive director for the First Tee program at Fairway Hills for two years.
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