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NEWS
January 15, 2013
As someone who has frequently stood outside the main gate at Fort Meade in support of Pfc. Bradley Manning, I was extremely disappointed by Army judge Col. Denise Lind's ruling that Mr. Manning will get only a 112-day reduction in sentence if convicted, even though she recognized that he was tortured while being held at the Quantico Marine base. The reduction is insignificant, considering that Mr. Manning could be imprisoned for life on the charge of "aiding the enemy. " The Wikileaks documents revealed that the U.S. government consorts with dictators and U.S. military personnel have committed war crimes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Much as it was on the Blackwater and at the Eyrie, Tyrion Lannister's is once again in danger. And, much as he did in those situations, Tyrion must rely on his phenomenal way with words (and Peter Dinklage's phenomenal acting) to sidestep that danger. The closing minutes of “The Laws of Gods and Men” was a court scene - - let's call it Tyrion's Trial - - and it was one of the strongest scenes this season. Dinklage's final monologue summed up with true feeling all of his character's troubles throughout his privileged-but-demeaned life and the injustice he now finds himself facing.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Attorneys for two Jewish brothers, who are accused of beating a black teen while patrolling their Northwest Baltimore neighborhood, argued Monday that their trial should be delayed or transferred because African-American leaders and the news media have inextricably linked it to the Florida killing of Trayvon Martin. The similarities between the cases "are conspicuous," defense lawyers for Avi and Eliyahu Werdesheim wrote in an eight-page motion filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, shortly before the brothers' trial was set to begin after six postponements.
NEWS
January 15, 2013
As someone who has frequently stood outside the main gate at Fort Meade in support of Pfc. Bradley Manning, I was extremely disappointed by Army judge Col. Denise Lind's ruling that Mr. Manning will get only a 112-day reduction in sentence if convicted, even though she recognized that he was tortured while being held at the Quantico Marine base. The reduction is insignificant, considering that Mr. Manning could be imprisoned for life on the charge of "aiding the enemy. " The Wikileaks documents revealed that the U.S. government consorts with dictators and U.S. military personnel have committed war crimes.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court for the first time took up the question yesterday of whether the conduct of spectators might deprive a defendant of a fair trial and require that a criminal conviction be overturned. The justices heard arguments in a San Jose, Calif., murder case in which three members of the victim's family had worn buttons with small photos of him during part of the trial. In 1995, a jury convicted Mathew Musladin of shooting and killing Tom Studer, the fiance of his estranged wife, Pamela, in the driveway of her home.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac | July 25, 1991
A Florida prosecutor's decision to publicize allegations by three women that rape suspect William Kennedy Smith sexually assaulted them prompted debate yesterday in legal circles as to whether Mr. Smith will receive a fair trial."
NEWS
By Newsday | November 9, 1990
MIAMI -- A federal judge has ordered Cable News Network to stop broadcasting taped telephone conversations made from prison by ousted Panamanian leader Manuel Antonio Noriega, saying that the tapes may have damaged Noriega's right to a fair trial.But officials at CNN, calling the order unconstitutional, continued the coverage and network lawyers asked the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta for an emergency hearing today.Noriega's attorney, Frank Rubino, told U.S. District Court Judge William Hoeveler that the tapes broadcast by CNN include conversations between the deposed general and his lawyers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 2002
PARIS - The European Court of Human Rights ruled yesterday that an aged Nazi collaborator, Maurice Papon, was denied a fair trial when France refused to allow him to appeal a 1998 conviction for war crimes stemming from his involvement in the wartime deportation of Jews to German death camps. Attorneys for Papon, 91, who is serving a 10-year sentence in La Sante prison in Paris, said they would take the case to France's highest appeals court and, in the meantime, would seek Papon's immediate release.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 2000
MOSCOW - A Moscow city court judge rejected a series of defense motions yesterday in the spy trial of American Edmond Pope that his lawyer said were essential to receiving a fair hearing. Judge Nina Barkina also rejected a request that an independent medical panel examine Pope, who suffers from bone cancer, to determine if he is fit to remain in prison or to stand trial. Pope, 54, a retired U.S. naval intelligence officer turned businessman, is accused of collecting classified Russian military technology information for several years, according to the 26-page indictment read in court yesterday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Even the judge had a hard time understanding how a man so polite in court could be so vicious on the street. In May 2008, Donnell Lamont Covington stabbed Robert Johnson twice with a knife on James Street, near the B&O Railroad Museum. The second slice severed the victim's carotid artery, and Covington, known as "Lil' Black," left him to bleed to death on the street. A motive remains unclear, but a jury convicted Covington of first-degree murder after hearing three days of testimony in Baltimore Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Attorneys for two Jewish brothers, who are accused of beating a black teen while patrolling their Northwest Baltimore neighborhood, argued Monday that their trial should be delayed or transferred because African-American leaders and the news media have inextricably linked it to the Florida killing of Trayvon Martin. The similarities between the cases "are conspicuous," defense lawyers for Avi and Eliyahu Werdesheim wrote in an eight-page motion filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, shortly before the brothers' trial was set to begin after six postponements.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
A Dundalk man is not guilty of killing his 89-year-old neighbor, a Baltimore County judge ruled Wednesday after two days of testimony in a 2010 murder case. Michael W. Hester, who was charged with first-degree murder in the stabbing death of Eleanor Marie Haley, said he is eager to rebuild his life. He said he entered Haley's house and found her dead after seeing water coming from her back door. He then called 911. Prosecutors argued during the trial that he killed Haley and turned on the water - a lawn sprinkler - to explain his presence at her home in the 7200 block of York Drive.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
A family that unsuccessfully sued Baltimore police officers who arrested a 7-year-old boy for illegally riding a dirt bike in 2007 received a fair civil trial in Howard County, the state's second-highest court has ruled. The family had hoped to collect $700,000 in damages after Gerard Mungo Jr., who is now 11, was arrested. However a Howard County jury rejected the family's civil suit, even after a judge ruled that the arrest of the boy was illegal. In their appeal, the family's lawyers contended that the case should not have been moved to Howard County, because lawyers were not allowed to argue against it and because the racial makeup of the county is different from the city's . In its ruling issued Friday, the Court of Special Appeals decided that a city judge properly moved the case out of Baltimore because of the volume of publicity fueled by protesters, the news media and what judges called prejudicial comments by the city's mayor.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | July 2, 2010
A Virginia Circuit Court judge Thursday ordered the release of sealed police records in the murder case against former University of Virginia lacrosse player George Huguely IV of Chevy Chase. The Washington Post and three other media outlets had challenged the secrecy surrounding information found during searches connected to the case against Huguely, who has been charged in Charlottesville in the May 3 killing of Yeardley Love, 22, a U-Va. lacrosse player whom Huguely had dated.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
Two Baltimore men convicted of killing a father at his daughter's " Sweet 16" party four years ago will get a new trial after the state's highest court ruled that a judge misled potential jurors into believing that the suspects should be found guilty. The Maryland Court of Appeals ruling released Friday states that Baltimore Circuit Judge Charles G. Bernstein, during the process to select 12 jurors for the 2007 trial, asked how much credibility the potential jurors gave to television crime show dramas that highlight sometimes fictional, high-tech methods of gathering evidence.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Even the judge had a hard time understanding how a man so polite in court could be so vicious on the street. In May 2008, Donnell Lamont Covington stabbed Robert Johnson twice with a knife on James Street, near the B&O Railroad Museum. The second slice severed the victim's carotid artery, and Covington, known as "Lil' Black," left him to bleed to death on the street. A motive remains unclear, but a jury convicted Covington of first-degree murder after hearing three days of testimony in Baltimore Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 17, 1990
MIAMI -- Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, standing erect in his full military uniform, made a dramatic plea for fairness yesterday, telling a federal court that the U.S. government "has done as much as possible to deprive me of a fair trial."The deposed Panamanian dictator told U.S. District Judge William M. Hoeveler that "the government of the United States does not wish that I defend myself" as preparations bogged down for his drug-trafficking trial.Uttering his first words in public since being forcibly brought to the United States in January at the conclusion of the U.S. invasion of Panama, General Noriega protested that he was being prevented from retaining his private lawyers of choice because his overseas bank accounts had been frozen by federal officials.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1999
Lawyers for Larry Young complained yesterday about the racial makeup of the mostly white jury selected to hear the corruption case against the former state senator and criticized prosecutors for using nearly all of their objections to strike African-Americans from the panel. Defense attorney Gregg L. Bernstein said Young's right to a fair trial was undermined by the small number of African-Americans in the jury pool. At the end of the day, 10 whites and two blacks were selected as jurors.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | April 2, 2010
The man charged with killing Los Angeles Angels pitcher Nick Adenhart last year wants to move the murder trial outside Orange County, Calif. The attorney for 23-year-old Andrew Thomas Gallo says the publicity surrounding the April 9, 2009, crash will make it hard for Gallo to get a fair trial. Gallo has pleaded not guilty to three counts of murder and other felonies in the crash that killed the Western Maryland native and two friends.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2010
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court appeared troubled Monday by the selection of the jury that convicted former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling as well as the use of a federal fraud law against him. Several justices appeared receptive to arguments by Skilling's lawyer that he did not have a fair trial in Houston, Enron's hometown, following the energy company's 2001 collapse that cost thousands of jobs and billions of dollars. Amid concern that the trial judge spent too little time questioning prospective jurors, Justice Stephen Breyer said, "I'm worried about a fair trial in this instance."
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