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Fair Lady

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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 25, 1994
No one would ever accuse "My Fair Lady" of being light on its feet, and the restored version of the 3 1/2 -hour 1964 behemoth that has just opened on the big screen at the Senator sometimes feels like an attack by the Third Armored Division with full air and artillery support. Still, it packs considerable entertainment wallop.Adapted from the famous Lerner-Loewe musical of the '50s, which itself was adapted from George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," the movie was directed by the elderly George Cukor, a specialist in "women's pictures."
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By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,Special to The Sun | November 8, 2007
Hats off to a lady: Trevor Nunn's technically exquisite My Fair Lady has finally made its way to the U.S. from London, and with a little bit of luck you can catch it this week or next at the Hippodrome Theatre. She has her flaws, this grand old gal, mostly to do with that elusive theatrical element known as chemistry; a bit of fizz has been lost during shipping (and may dampen any Broadway ambitions reasonably harbored by this high-gloss Cameron Mackintosh production). But the formula's only marginally off, and there's so much right with the show that fans of old-fashioned musical comedy won't want to miss it. If you go Showtimes for My Fair Lady are 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturdays; and 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Sundays through Nov. 18 at the Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, 12 N. Eutaw St. $25-$70.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 31, 1991
Ever since its debut 35 years ago, "My Fair Lady" has been rightly recognized as one of the greatest American musicals. But the revival that opened at the Mechanic Theatre last night is only slightly better than fair.Its chief asset is its stars -- honey-throated Christine Andreas as Eliza Doolittle, the cockney flower seller; elegant John Neville as Professor Higgins, who attempts to turn her into a lady; walrus-like James Valentine as his crony, Colonel Pickering; and especially Clive Revill, who portrays Eliza's ever-inebriated dad as a gruff and grimy teddy bear.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2007
FAMILY MUSICAL ON ICE Disney's High School Musical: The Ice Tour skates its way to 1st Mariner Arena tonight and remains through Sunday. Inspired by the Disney Channel movies High School Musical and High School Musical 2, the ice show features skaters taking part in song and dance, telling the story of an unlikely pair who try out for the school musical. .................... Performances are at 7:30 tonight; 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. tomorrow; 11 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Saturday; and noon and 4 p.m. Sunday at the arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. $16-$56.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | October 31, 1991
THE LERNER and Loewe musical version of George Bernard Shaw's ''Pygmalion'' is as fair and as pleasing as ever.A road production of the musical opened last evening at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. A tight, professional presentation, it proves once more that this particular ''Lady'' is always welcome. She has not aged. She may never age.''My Fair Lady'' is marking its 35th year, but time has dimmed neither the score nor the book of this very durable musical.The book was written by Alan Jay Lerner, who also wrote the lyrics.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2003
Annapolis Summer Garden's My Fair Lady is the best show seen in many a moon at the theater under the stars. Running through the season's close on Aug. 30, this production is extraordinarily well-staged and well-paced. Most important -- Summer Garden's My Fair Lady is faithful to Lerner and Loewe's mission to preserve the wit of Pygmalion, the George Bernard Shaw play on which the musical is based. Committed to delivering a classic interpretation of this musical that debuted on Broadway in 1956, director Douglas Kotula has assembled a first-rate cast that shares his commitment.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | September 24, 1991
"My Fair Lady" is a toughie, even for professional companies.Thebreadth of talent required to bring these timeless characters to life is daunting.The score and libretto are so familiar that any audience can spotan unsuitable impostor almost immediately.But perhaps the greatest obstacle is the fact that these characters were so definitively sketched by the original cast that damning comparisons are far more inevitable than usual.Rex Harrison's nimble tongue spewing forth Henry Higgins' linguistic egotism, Julie Andrews' lyric soprano voice inimitably describing her "loverly" cockney dreams, and Stanley Holloway's one of a kind Alfred P. Doolittle all became classic interpretations way back on opening night and have remained so to this day.Bravo, then, to the Annapolis Dinner Theater for gamely taking up the "My Fair Lady" challenge and doing such a creditable job with it. While this is a production that won't win rapturous swoons from dyed-in-the-wool Lerner and Lowe purists, the strengths of the ADT's efforts are considerable.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2000
For the next two months, Chesapeake Music Hall will be a "loverly" spot with "My Fair Lady" in residence. Based on George Bernard Shaw's 1914 play "Pygmalion," this delightful musical has lyrics and dialogue by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe. It opened on Broadway in March 1956 and ran for 2,717 performances, a record number then. "My Fair Lady" made Broadway musical history with Lerner and Loewe's score, which retained Shaw's sharp wit and added warmth, charm and enchanting melody.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2003
Tomorrow, the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre begins a monthlong weekend run of My Fair Lady to close its 38th season under the stars. For legions of fans, this 1956 musical, based on George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion about altering class distinctions, is the fairest of all musicals. A steady rain fell on Monday's on-site rehearsal but didn't dampen the spirits of the director and leading cast members. Pointing to nearly completed sets depicting a London Street, gardens and a library, company spokesman Evan Brierly noted, "All of this great work was done today by artist Erin Meye, and with another clear day we'll see more progress on the set construction.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2000
For legions of musical theater fans, Lerner and Loewe's "My Fair Lady" is the fairest of them all. Written in 1956, this musical based on George Bernard Shaw's play "Pygmalion" is a witty exploration of altering class distinctions by acquiring proper speech. In the production running through April 23, the cast delivers all that is required, and more, to make "My Fair Lady" one of the best shows ever at Chesapeake Music Hall. The play opens outside Covent Garden, where Professor Henry Higgins takes notes on cockney flower seller Eliza Doolittle's speech patterns.
NEWS
January 30, 2006
Nellie Y. McKay, a distinguished scholar and critic who helped secure a place for African-American women in the modern literary canon, died of cancer Jan. 22 at a hospice in Fitchburg, Wis. She was believed to have been in her mid-70s. She was Evjue professor of American and African-American literature at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where she lived. An authority on black American literature of the 19th and 20th centuries, Dr. McKay specialized in the study of fiction, autobiography and women's writing.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG AND MIKE KLINGAMAN and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG AND MIKE KLINGAMAN,SUN REPORTERS | October 3, 2005
Damon Runyon has always been one of our favorite sportswriters, and not just because he could turn a phrase better than just about anyone else who ever lived. It was Runyon's book of short stories about lovestruck gangsters in 1931, you see, that eventually became the inspiration for the classic Broadway musical Guys and Dolls. Musicals have always helped inject a little comedy into tragic situations, and so we decided to tell the tragic story of the 2005 Orioles in the form of an off, off, off-Broadway musical.
NEWS
By Norman Allen | August 21, 2005
THE MAGIC began on a Saturday afternoon when my parents, sister and I climbed the steps to the balcony of the Curran Theater in San Francisco. We took our seats. The lights dimmed, the overture began and a scene from Edwardian England appeared far below us. I was 7 years old. It was my first trip to the theater. And I was ready. Seven is young to be attending a full-length Broadway musical. As an adult theatergoer, I would not be pleased to find myself seated next to a child that age, especially when paying $100 for the ticket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | December 23, 2004
We've come to it now - the great battle of our time," said a member of the fellowship in The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. The new "Platinum Series Special Edition" four-disc DVD (New Line) renders the battle even greater, adding 50 additional minutes to the movie, which originally ran 3 hours and 21 minutes. It turns what was already an epic, exhaustive finale to the best movie trilogy ever into a stately, spectacular summation. There are extended sequences, additional explorations of characters and motivations, and restored scenes that were sacrificed (including the last stand of Christopher Lee's Saruman and a romantic interlude between Miranda Otto's Eowyn and David Wenham's Faramir)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2003
Annapolis Summer Garden's My Fair Lady is the best show seen in many a moon at the theater under the stars. Running through the season's close on Aug. 30, this production is extraordinarily well-staged and well-paced. Most important -- Summer Garden's My Fair Lady is faithful to Lerner and Loewe's mission to preserve the wit of Pygmalion, the George Bernard Shaw play on which the musical is based. Committed to delivering a classic interpretation of this musical that debuted on Broadway in 1956, director Douglas Kotula has assembled a first-rate cast that shares his commitment.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2003
Tomorrow, the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre begins a monthlong weekend run of My Fair Lady to close its 38th season under the stars. For legions of fans, this 1956 musical, based on George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion about altering class distinctions, is the fairest of all musicals. A steady rain fell on Monday's on-site rehearsal but didn't dampen the spirits of the director and leading cast members. Pointing to nearly completed sets depicting a London Street, gardens and a library, company spokesman Evan Brierly noted, "All of this great work was done today by artist Erin Meye, and with another clear day we'll see more progress on the set construction.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1999
At Elmira Seibert's house, reminders of the annual Howard County Fair are everywhere. Rooms are decorated with entries from five decades of fairs, including stuffed animals, quilts and paintings. Cabinets are filled with patterns and recipes she might use in the future. A dozen family members are always scurrying about, working on possible submissions. Seibert is believed to be the only person to have participated in -- and won a blue ribbon at -- each of the county's 53 fairs.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 19, 1992
A salmon pink rose has been named after Julie Andrews, who portrayed the flower seller Eliza Doolittle in the original stage production of "My Fair Lady."Ms. Andrews said yesterday she was "ever so flattered" to be honored at the Chelsea Flower Show in London, which opens today sponsored by the Royal Horticultural Society.Ms. Andrews, who attended a preview of the show, said $1.80 from each "Julie Andrews" rose sold will be given to the Julie Andrews Appeal to fight arterial disease.The show marks the beginning of the British social season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | October 7, 2001
LONDON -- A domestic comedy that combines honeybees with Hamlet, a rollicking revival of one of the best-loved musicals of the 1950s, and an excoriating indictment of psychiatry. Three of the biggest hits in London exemplify the variety of fare currently on British stages. And since the two nonmusicals are by relative newcomers, they bode well for the future. American audiences can look for all three eventually to make their way to the States. Charlotte Jones' Humble Boy, a modern-day, Hamlet-inspired comedy at the Royal National Theatre, stars Diana Rigg -- casting guaranteed to produce results at the box office, even in a work by a little-known playwright.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2000
Marni Nixon has the prettiest voice you've never seen. When moviegoers watch Deborah Kerr singing in "The King and I" (1956), Natalie Wood in "West Side Story" (1961) and Audrey Hepburn in "My Fair Lady" (1964), it's Nixon's voice they're hearing. If you'd like to see and hear the woman behind the voice, Nixon joins film restoration experts James Katz and Robert Harris for the Maryland Film Festival screening of the restored version of "My Fair Lady" today at 1 p.m. at the Senator Theater.
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