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Fair Labor Standards Act

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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A ruling by a federal judge in a lawsuit filed by federal employees over the government shutdown last fall has given the workers hope that they could soon be eligible for a payout. U.S. Court of Federal Claims Chief Judge Patricia Campbell-Smith declined to dismiss the lawsuit brought by some 2,000 workers who were deemed essential during the during the 16-day shutdown. The plaintiffs worked through the shutdown but didn't get paid on time for their labor. Campbell-Smith wrote in an opinion that the federal government violated the Fair Labor Standards Act, but she didn't go as far as saying that the government needed to pay the plaintiffs.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A ruling by a federal judge in a lawsuit filed by federal employees over the government shutdown last fall has given the workers hope that they could soon be eligible for a payout. U.S. Court of Federal Claims Chief Judge Patricia Campbell-Smith declined to dismiss the lawsuit brought by some 2,000 workers who were deemed essential during the during the 16-day shutdown. The plaintiffs worked through the shutdown but didn't get paid on time for their labor. Campbell-Smith wrote in an opinion that the federal government violated the Fair Labor Standards Act, but she didn't go as far as saying that the government needed to pay the plaintiffs.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2010
A lawsuit against the corporate owner of the Greene Turtle sports bar restaurants, alleging the Edgewater-based chain failed to pay overtime and minimum wages, is moving forward as a class action that could include hundreds of current and former employees. The lawsuit, filed by two former servers at the chain's location at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, seeks unpaid wages and overtime for as many as 1,000 current and former employees in the past three years, according to Howard B. Hoffman, an attorney representing the plaintiffs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Operators of nine McDonald's in the Baltimore area and on the Eastern Shore agreed to pay more than $250,000 in back wages and damages to 138 workers for violations of minimum wage, overtime and child labor provisions, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday. Annapolis-based franchise operators Gold Hat Inc. and Gold Hat II Inc., which have the same owner, will also pay $4,300 in civil penalties for the child labor violations, under the agreement. "The restaurant industry employs some of the most at-risk workers that we see," Mark Lara, director of the Labor Department's wage and hour division's Baltimore district office, said in a statement.
NEWS
July 2, 2010
For a solution to the problem of excessive overtime pay costs in Baltimore City, we need only review a bit of history. The Fair Labor Standards Act passed in 1937 was a job-creation technique. It established the 40-hour work week with penalty pay, also known as overtime pay, for hours worked over 40, weekends, holidays, and so on. This was a time of heavy unemployment. The hope was that by limiting working hours, more people would be employed. The health benefits of a more reasonable work week were incidental, but considered.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Operators of nine McDonald's in the Baltimore area and on the Eastern Shore agreed to pay more than $250,000 in back wages and damages to 138 workers for violations of minimum wage, overtime and child labor provisions, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday. Annapolis-based franchise operators Gold Hat Inc. and Gold Hat II Inc., which have the same owner, will also pay $4,300 in civil penalties for the child labor violations, under the agreement. "The restaurant industry employs some of the most at-risk workers that we see," Mark Lara, director of the Labor Department's wage and hour division's Baltimore district office, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1998
A group of so-called chicken catchers who do the dirty work of dragging hundreds of thousands of birds to slaughter each week is suing Perdue Farms Inc. for failing to pay them overtime wages.The class-action suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore in the names of eight longtime catchers from the Eastern Shore, claims the way Perdue pays its chicken gatherers violates the federal Fair Labor Standards Act and Maryland wage laws.Richard C. Auletta, a Perdue spokesman, said yesterday that because the catchers are hired by independent contractors, they are not company employees.
NEWS
June 9, 1997
The members of our union believe you should re-title your June 4 editorial. Instead of ''Family-friendly scheduling," it should be ''Sweatshops are back!"Employees who are eligible for overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act are most of the time the lowest paid employees in the work force. Employers, under the proposed Senate bill, could require ''busy moms and dads'' to work 60 or 70 hours one week and then require them to work 20 to 10 hours the next.Busy moms and dads will be unable to find child care when they cannot predict their hours.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | March 26, 1993
A committee of the Carroll Recreation and Parks Advisory Board has recommended that all county recreation programs include provisions for the handicapped.The Recreation and Parks Department should work to increase awareness and acceptance of people with disabilities, according a report from the Inclusive Recreational Programs committee.The committee is chaired by board member Robin Farinholt. Members are department staffer Barbara Gundina and board member Tom DiMaggio.The board will discuss the report at its next meeting, Chairman Clark Shaffer said Wednesday during a board meeting at Hashawha Environmental Appreciation Center.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2010
A Millersville electrical contractor has been ordered by the U.S. Department of Labor to pay $45,745 in back wages to workers whom the company didn't pay overtime. Asplundh Tree Expert Co., which did business as Utility Lines Construction Services Inc., denied overtime to 41 workers performing manhole inspections for working more than 40 hours week, the Labor Department said. The company also did not keep proper records of employee work hours, the agency found. The employees were required to pick up and drive company vehicles prior to arriving at a job site and then return them after their shift ended.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2010
A lawsuit against the corporate owner of the Greene Turtle sports bar restaurants, alleging the Edgewater-based chain failed to pay overtime and minimum wages, is moving forward as a class action that could include hundreds of current and former employees. The lawsuit, filed by two former servers at the chain's location at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, seeks unpaid wages and overtime for as many as 1,000 current and former employees in the past three years, according to Howard B. Hoffman, an attorney representing the plaintiffs.
NEWS
July 2, 2010
For a solution to the problem of excessive overtime pay costs in Baltimore City, we need only review a bit of history. The Fair Labor Standards Act passed in 1937 was a job-creation technique. It established the 40-hour work week with penalty pay, also known as overtime pay, for hours worked over 40, weekends, holidays, and so on. This was a time of heavy unemployment. The hope was that by limiting working hours, more people would be employed. The health benefits of a more reasonable work week were incidental, but considered.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 19, 1997
Three former members and one current member of the kitchen staff at Loews Annapolis Hotel have filed a federal suit seeking a total of $38,000 in overtime.John G. Newgent of Stevensville, Abraham Torres of Washington, and Jeffrey W. Ledford and Natalie R. Shumard, both of Annapolis, allege that they are owed overtime dating to 1991 for work they did at catered events at the hotel.Ledford was a supervisor, or "banquet captain," from 1991 to 1995, according to the suit, and the others have been waiters during the past few years, the lawsuit says.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | May 18, 2007
Three years ago, the Department of Labor overhauled the nation's overtime rules - but only for the private sector. The federal government plans to follow suit, but change has been slow, leaving most of the executive branch open to what former Labor Secretary Elaine Chao once described as "a lawsuit lottery." Pikesville attorney Mike Snider is a frequent player. He is managing grievances against at least 15 agencies for depriving workers of thousands of dollars in overtime, and he has won concessions from five of them.
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