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November 24, 2011
Listings are accepted on a space-available basis. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday prior to date of publication at the latest. To submit volunteer items, mail to Volunteers, Patuxent Publishing Co. Editorial, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; email hccalendar@patuxent.com ; fax 410-332-6336; or call 410-332-6497. Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. - Maryland's only statewide fair housing organization is currently recruiting dedicated, paid volunteers to help enforce fair housing laws in Howard County.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
A vacant Baltimore home owned by Bank of America receives better upkeep if it is located in a largely white neighborhood, a discriminatory practice that hurts minority areas, the National Fair Housing Alliance alleged in a complaint filed Thursday. The complaint argues that there are "stark racial disparities" in Bank of America marketing or maintenance practices in 20 metropolitan areas, a violation of the Fair Housing Act. Baltimore was one of five cities added Thursday to the complaint, first filed with the Department of Housing and Urban Development in 2012.
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BUSINESS
December 15, 1996
The National Association of Realtors (NAR) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development have signed a new fair housing partnership agreement to replace the Voluntary Affirmative Marketing Agreement that had been in effect for more than two decades.The signing took place earlier this month at a meeting of organizations participating with HUD in the "National Partners in Home Ownership" plan to raise the nation's homeownership to a record 67.5 percent by the year 2000.NAR is one of more than 50 organizations in the "Partners" plan.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Lucille Gorham, a longtime East Baltimore neighborhood activist whose "quick wits and good-natured tenacity" equipped her as the voice of poor residents who lived near Johns Hopkins Hospital, died of cancer Saturday at her Belair-Edison home. She was 81. "What a wonderful human being she was," said former city Housing Commissioner M. Jay Brodie. "She was one of the best community leaders I ever encountered. She had a quality of leadership, a willingness to listen and a comprehension of detailed plans without the necessity of a fancy college degree.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1998
The National Association of Realtors and the Department of Housing and Urban Development have devised a program to better educate Realtors about fair housing and housing discrimination.The course complements the "Many Neighborhoods -- One America" campaign that was launched this month in conjunction with the 30th anniversary of the Fair Housing Law of the Civil Rights Act of 1968.The course is designed to teach real estate professionals to better understand the law. When Realtors complete the course, they will receive a certificate and will be allowed to use a new "One America" mark in their ads.The Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors, the nation's oldest real estate board, said that for the remainder of the year the organization will be involved with many outreach programs, according to President Gilbert D. Marsiglia.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
FOR RENT: "Old Homeland. Available 10/1/93. Quiet country setting. 2BR apartment in restored Victorian. Ideal for married couple/professional. . ."What's wrong with this ad? Plenty, says a group that has fought housing discrimination aimed at blacks and now is looking at housing bias against families with children.Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. says that the ad contains language that can steer families with children from certain rental homes in violation of the Fair Housing Act.BNI says when apartment hunters read "ideal for married couple/professional," those who have children would not consider responding.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1994
A Baltimore-based fair housing group is taking a new tack in its long-running fight against discrimination.After more than a decade of filing lawsuits against builders, developers and publishers to force compliance with federal fair housing laws, Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. is recognizing one builder's efforts to promote fairness, hoping others will follow the example.BNI has chosen Ryland Homes Inc., the Baltimore area's largest homebuilder, and the Bomstein Agency of Washington as the first recipients of a fair housing award, based on Ryland's real estate advertising.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | May 4, 1992
In 1967 George Laurent took the job as executive director of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a group formed to promote fair, non-discriminatory housing.Such jobs, which require a high level of dedication for relatively low pay, are often burnout positions, something someone does while the fire of social activism burns bright before answering a more lucrative call for conventional employment.But 25 years later, Mr. Laurent, now 66, is still executive director of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. (BNI)
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | May 28, 1998
IT HAS BEEN a little more than 30 years since passage of the Fair Housing Act, part of the U.S. Civil Rights Act of 1968, which was approved by Congress under pressure from President Lyndon Johnson. It prohibited discrimination in the sale or rental of housing, except owner-occupied, single-family housing with four or fewer occupants, sold or rented without the aid of a broker or an agent.The results have been mixed. Progress has certainly been made in middle- and upper-class suburban homeownership and in apartment housing.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | October 22, 1992
In a decision that expands the legal weapons used to combat housing discrimination, a U.S. appeals court has ruled that the federal Fair Housing Act prohibits "redlining" in insurance just as it does in mortgage lending.The decision by a three-judge federal appeals court panel in Chicago was hailed as "a major breakthrough" by fair-housing advocates because it brings the insurance industry under the same law that has been used in the past to attack discriminatory practices by banks, other mortgage lenders and real estate agents.
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Hundreds of families living in some of Baltimore's most impoverished neighborhoods will get to move to better conditions under a proposed settlement that could finally resolve a fair housing case dating back to 1995. Attorneys representing current and former public housing residents filed the settlement, which still has to be approved by a judge, in U.S. District Court late Friday. They hope the agreement with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development will finally end more than 70 years of housing segregation that they say the government helped exacerbate.
EXPLORE
May 7, 2012
It was a standing room only crowd April 20 at the Havre de Grace Activity Center for "Fair Housing in 2012: A Clear Path for All. " The training, free and open to the public, was the result of partnership and collaboration among the Harford County Department of Community Services Office of Human Relations, the Harford County Housing Agency and the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development. "Havre de Grace was essentially the last stop on the Underground Railroad for many heading north," Harford County Executive David Craig said in a press release.
EXPLORE
April 30, 2012
As the leading advocate for homeownership and housing issues, the Harford County Association of Realtors joined the National Association of Realtors in honoring Fair Housing Month this April and received a proclamation from the Harford County Council declaring April Fair Housing Month. Carole Milan, chairperson of the Equal Opportunity Committee, led the association Fair Housing Poster Contest among the local students in kindergarten through eighth grade. From the many submitted entries, three students' posters are recognized and submitted to the Maryland Association of Realtors as entries in the state Fair Housing Calendar contest.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | April 11, 2012
The National Fair Housing Alliance said Tuesday that it has filed a federal housing discrimination complaint   against Wells Fargo, alleging that the bank is doing a better job maintaining foreclosed homes in white neighborhoods than foreclosures in minority neighborhoods. The alliance said last week that it scored the condition of foreclosed homes in nine regions , including Baltimore, and found disparities based on the racial makeup of neighborhoods. (The Baltimore metro area was an outlier in the alliance's report: Though staffers found differences by neighborhood, the overall scores were basically equally lousy.)
NEWS
By Robert Henderson | January 17, 2012
President Barack Obama's recess appointment to direct the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), Richard Cordray, wasted no time in announcing the watchdog agency's "nonbank supervision program. " Bringing nonbank mortgage lenders more fully and formally under federal supervision could represent a historic moment for fair housing enforcement more than four decades after the passage of the 1968 Fair Housing Act. But only if congressional Republicans get out of the way and let Mr. Cordray do his job. Primarily targeting discrimination by real estate brokers, the 1968 law made it illegal to refuse to rent or sell real estate on the basis of race, religion, or national origin - all common practices prior to its passage.
EXPLORE
November 24, 2011
Listings are accepted on a space-available basis. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday prior to date of publication at the latest. To submit volunteer items, mail to Volunteers, Patuxent Publishing Co. Editorial, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; email hccalendar@patuxent.com ; fax 410-332-6336; or call 410-332-6497. Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. - Maryland's only statewide fair housing organization is currently recruiting dedicated, paid volunteers to help enforce fair housing laws in Howard County.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
Moving to enhance equal housing opportunities in Baltimore, the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors and the Maryland office of the Department of Housing and Urban Development signed a new Fair Housing Partnership Agreement yesterday.The partnership stems from a collaborative agreement between the National Association of Realtors and HUD in December that stipulates similar agreements on the local level. The GBBR is the second real estate board in the country to sign a fair housing partnership agreement with its local HUD office.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2000
HAD THE FAIR Housing Act existed in the 1950s, Lorraine Hansberry's "A Raisin in the Sun" might have been significantly different. The Youngers, a fictional family based on Hansberry's, would have had an easier time leaving a Chicago slum area and moving to an all-white neighborhood, improving their standard of living and helping their dreams come true. Such was the connection Francis Scott Key graduate Kim Mathias made in the essay that won her a $500 scholarship from Carroll County Association of Realtors.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
Dickens W. Warfield, a psychologist who as associate director of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. became an outspoken advocate for fair housing, died Oct. 21 of liver cancer at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. The longtime Towson resident was 86. The daughter of a lawyer and a homemaker, Dickens Waddell was born in Detroit, and later moved with her family to Pittsburgh, where she attended what is now Carnegie Mellon University for two years. After the death in 1944 of her father, she and her mother moved to Roland Park, where she enrolled at Goucher College and was a 1946 Phi Beta Kappa graduate, earning a bachelor's degree in psychology.
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