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NEWS
November 14, 1991
Although none of Maryland's 24 school districts earned distinguished marks in the state's annual performance assessment released this week, the fact that Baltimore city schools ranked at the bottom of the list is particular cause for concern. The system has been trying to improve itself for years, with varying degrees of enthusiasm. What the state education department report makes painfully clear is that, for the most part, these efforts have failed.The image of city schools that emerges is one of a struggling, under-funded system that fails to educate the vast majority of students to minimum standards of competence and that tolerates a level of chronic absenteeism that leads to a third of students dropping out before graduating from high school.
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NEWS
May 27, 2014
I was a Baltimore City school teacher for 34 years and have worked for the past 10 years as a Title I tutor in non-public schools. I too am sickened by Mr. Gansler's campaign ad blaming teachers for failing schools ( "Dear Mr. Gansler," May 20). His comments show a total disregard for dedicated teachers in Maryland schools. We too want the best for our students. That is why we spend hours each night planning activities that will engage our children. Mr. Gansler, we do consider them our children.
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NEWS
By Sean R. Tuffnell | March 9, 2000
DALLAS -- Poll after poll shows that education consistently registers among voters' top concerns -- regardless of party identification, gender or race. Parents see lower test scores, rising dropout rates and an economy increasingly driven by a high-tech work force, and they are becoming angry. The fear and frustration is especially high in poor urban areas with high minority populations and some of the worst-performing schools. Many parents in those areas are pleading for the right to choose a way out for their children.
NEWS
May 26, 2014
As an alumnus of the Baltimore School for the Arts I was outraged by Patricia Schultheis' recent commentary on the school ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19). The School for the Arts not only changed my life but has done so for more than two generations of students. I came from parents who used drugs and abused me. I came from a failing Baltimore City school system to a place where I was encouraged to learn. The School for the Arts is the only thing that kept me from being on the street.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie ... and Liz Bowie ...,Sun reporter | April 30, 2008
Maryland school officials gave their approval yesterday to plans to overhaul nine failing schools in the state. Teachers will have to reapply for their jobs at three Baltimore County and five Prince George's County schools. The three Baltimore County schools are Woodlawn High, Lansdowne Middle and Southwest Academy. In Harford County, the principal of failing Edgewood Middle School is retiring and will be replaced with someone who has gone through a national principal training program, called New Leaders for New Schools.
NEWS
May 28, 1998
WITH THE appointment of Robert Booker as chief executive officer of the Baltimore City Public Schools, the Board of School Commissioners has completed its most important task.Without strong, consistent and persuasive leadership, the school system will not overcome the problems that contribute to the failure of students to achieve academic success.Dr. Booker has many strengths the system needs -- extensive experience in a large, urban school system; solid grounding in the intricacies of budgets and bureaucracies, and the ability to listen and to lead.
NEWS
July 29, 2009
Heartened by the release of standardized test scores showing big gains for city public school students, Baltimore schools CEO Andr?s Alonso is moving quickly to follow up with the next phase of his ambitious reform agenda. The department is closing seven more underperforming elementary and secondary schools at the same time that it expands three others that have proven successful. The changes are part of a sweeping reorganization plan unveiled in March and are aimed at speeding up the pace of measurable improvements in student performance.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2002
State school officials are scrambling to find room for more of the hundreds of Baltimore City and Prince George's County children who want to transfer this fall from failing public schools. Baltimore received 347 applications from 30,000 children eligible for transfer under the new federal No Child Left Behind Act. The district scheduled a lottery tomorrow to fill 194 seats it says are open this fall in better schools. About 700 of the 6,000 eligible students in Prince George's applied, but the district found room for only 100. "We're not interested in being confrontational," said Ronald A. Peiffer, assistant state superintendent.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Taking advantage of recently relaxed rules, several area districts have persuaded the state to remove schools from a list of those that had failed to demonstrate "adequate yearly" academic progress under the federal No Child Left Behind law. The results of the appeals - based on a change in how children with learning disabilities are treated under the state's accountability program - came as a relief to school systems. Remaining on the list could subject the schools to an escalating list of sanctions that includes, ultimately, a state takeover.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2001
With Maryland moving to take control of another one of Baltimore's failing schools, city education chief Carmen V. Russo asked the state to hold off yesterday and instead let her carve out a special district of underachieving schools that would report directly to her. Russo proposed that she be given the chance to transform a dozen city schools, including the latest one targeted for state takeover, by personally working with each to improve everything from...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, Liz Bowie and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
- Newly named to head Baltimore's public schools, Gregory E. Thornton has unfinished business in the district he is leaving behind after 31/2 tumultuous years. Wearing a red T-shirt, he arrived Friday at a school where, to peals of laughter, the 59-year-old would join kids in a "jump rope-a-thon. " But, as so frequently happened during his tenure, there were political hoops to jump through first. "How are we doing?" Thornton asked a state senator he spied in the welcoming crowd.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
Baltimore school officials are putting the best face possible on what can only be called a disappointing performance by city students on a rigorous national exam that tests proficiency in reading and math. Though city students scored small gains in reading, only 14 percent of fourth-graders and 16 percent of eighth-graders were performing at grade-level, while math scores remained flat or declined slightly. Just 13 percent of city eighth-graders and 19 percent of fourth-graders scored proficient on the math exam.
NEWS
November 16, 2013
I am flabbergasted and dismayed but mostly depressed by the editorial regarding 3- and 4-year-olds being removed from school because of disruptive behavior ("Pre-K suspensions make no sense," Nov. 12). I am distressed not by the actions of the school but that these children are assaulting not just other kids but their teachers! Imagine, these preschool children are assaulting their teachers! The editorial writer has the temerity to say that the behavior will not improve if they are sent home because they are the ones that need to be in school the most.
NEWS
By Davin Hong | July 18, 2013
The $1.2 billion approved by the Maryland General Assembly for city school construction is a historic opportunity for transformation in Baltimore. But if, after 10 years, the outcome is just new schools, we will have missed a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to affect not only schools but entire neighborhoods. As an architect, I believe in the value of good facilities and their ability to create healthy environments that promote learning. But better buildings alone are not enough to restore communities.
NEWS
By Christopher B. Summers | March 11, 2013
Anyone hearing the ACLU's position on single-sex education would think something troubling is afoot in almost every town in America. The ACLU claims that single-sex education is an unlawful form of discrimination and that its supposed benefits are based on pseudoscience. In a supposed conspiracy to oppress children, the Catholic Church operates hundreds of single-sex schools across America. A handful of states have opened boys' and girls' schools themselves. The ACLU's lawyers allege that this practice amounts to gender apartheid, a misogynist attempt to hold women back.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2010
One chronically underperforming city high school would close at the end of the next school year, and four other schools would be restructured under a reorganization plan announced Tuesday by Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso. For Alonso, the recommendation to close just a single school in Baltimore stands in marked contrast to the sweeping changes he orchestrated during his first two years as schools chief. Alonso said the more limited proposal is a reflection of students' growth on standardized tests and the improving climate of the district over the past three years.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2010
Of the three incumbents seeking re-election to the Baltimore County Council, Kenneth N. Oliver might be facing the toughest primary battle. Six Democratic opponents are working to unseat the two-term councilman. They are campaigning on how to spur economic development, improve schools and enhance public safety. Oliver is running on what he has done for constituents. With no Republican candidate in the race, the tight Democratic primary will likely determine who represents the district that includes Woodlawn, Randallstown, Owings Mills and Reisterstown.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Five of the city's worst-performing schools have been matched with academic companies that will take over their operations next school year. The school system announced Tuesday the assignments of the five partner organizations that will lead the long-failing schools and put in place everything from new curriculum to new staff. In March, the city's school board approved the list of candidates who applied to partner with "turnaround schools," which the district hopes will be saved from closure under the new leadership.
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