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Fahrenheit

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NEWS
November 11, 2005
Did you know? -- The sun's surface temperature is 5500 degrees Celsius (9932 degrees Fahrenheit).
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
It will now need to feel at least 7 degrees colder on a winter day for the mayor's Code Blue program — which requires the city to offer additional homeless services and encourages private organizations to do the same — to be activated, a health official said Wednesday. "There are jurisdictions north of us that have fewer [cold emergency] days even though they're colder than us," said Brian M. Schleter, a spokesman for the Baltimore City Health Department, explaining that the decision to adjust the Code Blue criteria was made in part to keep Baltimore's actions in line with other cities on the eastern seaboard.
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NEWS
July 11, 1998
The increase in temperature of the Pacific Ocean during El Nino was misstated in yesterday's editions. The rise was about 9 degrees Fahrenheit.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/11/98
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetis, hippodromehatter@aol.com | September 8, 2011
Jiminy Cricket, the name I've given a cricket that's taken up residence in our cellar, chirps throughout the day. But maybe Jiminy is bewildered, because only male crickets chirp, and their nighttime serenading is how female crickets find male crickets during the mating season. As far as I know, though, Jiminy is alone. So maybe he isn't confused. Perhaps he's just lonely. Harmless to humans, crickets are mostly nocturnal, omnivorous feeders, and although their diet includes plants, the damage crickets do to plants is insignificant.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetis, hippodromehatter@aol.com | September 8, 2011
Jiminy Cricket, the name I've given a cricket that's taken up residence in our cellar, chirps throughout the day. But maybe Jiminy is bewildered, because only male crickets chirp, and their nighttime serenading is how female crickets find male crickets during the mating season. As far as I know, though, Jiminy is alone. So maybe he isn't confused. Perhaps he's just lonely. Harmless to humans, crickets are mostly nocturnal, omnivorous feeders, and although their diet includes plants, the damage crickets do to plants is insignificant.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
It will now need to feel at least 7 degrees colder on a winter day for the mayor's Code Blue program — which requires the city to offer additional homeless services and encourages private organizations to do the same — to be activated, a health official said Wednesday. "There are jurisdictions north of us that have fewer [cold emergency] days even though they're colder than us," said Brian M. Schleter, a spokesman for the Baltimore City Health Department, explaining that the decision to adjust the Code Blue criteria was made in part to keep Baltimore's actions in line with other cities on the eastern seaboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2004
Earlier this year, as filmmaker Michael Moore was putting the final touches on Fahrenheit 9/11, he unwittingly thrust himself into the debate over Internet file-trading ethics and the relatively unknown, free program BitTorrent. In an interview, Moore compared file-sharing of copyrighted movies to friends lending one another purchased DVDs. "I don't agree with copyright laws," he said, "and I don't have a problem with people downloading the movie and sharing it ... as long as they're not trying to make a profit off my labor."
NEWS
By Chris Collins | July 6, 2004
THERE'S SOMETHING frustrating about Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11. It's so juicy, it's so full of grainy, dubious shots of President Bush at his worst, it so tempts you to just say: See this movie oust the commander in chief. It's almost like a guilty pleasure. But what's frustrating is that Mr. Moore's movie is wrought with internal contradictions and intergalactic leaps of logic. Bush opponents are still trying to embrace it - some from a distance. "I wish Moore had been more scrupulously honest, more interested in examining other points of view, less inclined to make the facts line up to serve his purposes," syndicated columnist William Raspberry wrote last week.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 29, 2004
THE REPUBLICANS are learning how to cringe. They have owned the propaganda airwaves for so long now, and suddenly Michael Moore smacks the hell out of them in Fahrenheit 9/11. Enraged moviegoers spent $22 million watching the film over the weekend. They enter theaters as an audience and emerge as an electorate. But the Democrats ought to duck for cover, too. Over the weekend, the Charles Theatre's very walls seemed to bulge. The place was sold out, one performance after another, two theaters at a time.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 25, 2004
Ray Bradbury has been raging over the way filmmaker Michael Moore alluded to Bradbury's anti-book-burning novel Fahrenheit 451 in the title of Moore's documentary Fahrenheit 9/11. Bradbury told a Swedish journalist that Moore is a "dreadful" and "dishonest" man and said that in his mind Moore plagiarized the title. Bradbury said his fury "has nothing to do with my political views." But a glance at the 50th anniversary edition of Fahrenheit 451 (Ballantine/Del Rey) suggests Bradbury is opposed to anyone using his fiction to make simplistic political points.
NEWS
November 11, 2005
Did you know? -- The sun's surface temperature is 5500 degrees Celsius (9932 degrees Fahrenheit).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 21, 2004
This year's Oscar race could prove more heated than any in recent memory, for reasons that have nothing to do with the quality of the movies under consideration. Both Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ and Michael Moore's documentary Fahrenheit 9 / 11 have enthralled audiences and dominated public discourse in ways that typically would suggest Oscar nods are assured. But neither are consensus picks as great films. Both have vociferous proponents and equally vocal detractors. Both are films whose popularity has as much to do with what they represent -- religious fundamentalism and Christian ideology for The Passion, liberal politics and a distrust of the current presidential administration for Fahrenheit -- as their artistic merit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2004
Earlier this year, as filmmaker Michael Moore was putting the final touches on Fahrenheit 9/11, he unwittingly thrust himself into the debate over Internet file-trading ethics and the relatively unknown, free program BitTorrent. In an interview, Moore compared file-sharing of copyrighted movies to friends lending one another purchased DVDs. "I don't agree with copyright laws," he said, "and I don't have a problem with people downloading the movie and sharing it ... as long as they're not trying to make a profit off my labor."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sharon Waxman and Sharon Waxman,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 2004
The record-breaking success of Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 may mark a turning point in the acceptance of documentaries by audiences as mass entertainment and by movie distributors as potential profit centers. This anti-Bush documentary is merely the latest and most successful of many feature-length documentaries that have hit it big at the box office in the last few years, among them the current release Super Size Me, about the perils of eating fast food, which has taken in close to $10 million so far; Winged Migration, a nature film that took in $11 million last year; and Spellbound, about spelling bees, which took in $5.7 million.
NEWS
By Chris Collins | July 6, 2004
THERE'S SOMETHING frustrating about Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11. It's so juicy, it's so full of grainy, dubious shots of President Bush at his worst, it so tempts you to just say: See this movie oust the commander in chief. It's almost like a guilty pleasure. But what's frustrating is that Mr. Moore's movie is wrought with internal contradictions and intergalactic leaps of logic. Bush opponents are still trying to embrace it - some from a distance. "I wish Moore had been more scrupulously honest, more interested in examining other points of view, less inclined to make the facts line up to serve his purposes," syndicated columnist William Raspberry wrote last week.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 1, 2004
BOSTON -- Maybe it was because the man on my left was doing a play-by-play when any member of the Bush team came on the screen. Maybe it was because the movie theater was within pitching range of Fenway Park. But halfway through Fahrenheit 9/11, I realized this wasn't an audience, it was a fan club. They weren't watching the movie, they were rooting for it. I saw this movie in a sold-out theater on a Monday night surrounded by people in their 20s. You go, Michael. If Fahrenheit 9/11 preaches to the choir, you could find me in the alto section.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 1, 2004
BOSTON -- Maybe it was because the man on my left was doing a play-by-play when any member of the Bush team came on the screen. Maybe it was because the movie theater was within pitching range of Fenway Park. But halfway through Fahrenheit 9/11, I realized this wasn't an audience, it was a fan club. They weren't watching the movie, they were rooting for it. I saw this movie in a sold-out theater on a Monday night surrounded by people in their 20s. You go, Michael. If Fahrenheit 9/11 preaches to the choir, you could find me in the alto section.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sharon Waxman and Sharon Waxman,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 2004
The record-breaking success of Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 may mark a turning point in the acceptance of documentaries by audiences as mass entertainment and by movie distributors as potential profit centers. This anti-Bush documentary is merely the latest and most successful of many feature-length documentaries that have hit it big at the box office in the last few years, among them the current release Super Size Me, about the perils of eating fast food, which has taken in close to $10 million so far; Winged Migration, a nature film that took in $11 million last year; and Spellbound, about spelling bees, which took in $5.7 million.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 29, 2004
THE REPUBLICANS are learning how to cringe. They have owned the propaganda airwaves for so long now, and suddenly Michael Moore smacks the hell out of them in Fahrenheit 9/11. Enraged moviegoers spent $22 million watching the film over the weekend. They enter theaters as an audience and emerge as an electorate. But the Democrats ought to duck for cover, too. Over the weekend, the Charles Theatre's very walls seemed to bulge. The place was sold out, one performance after another, two theaters at a time.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2004
Allan Starkey didn't go to see Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 yesterday to have his mind changed about George W. Bush or the war in Iraq. He wasn't disappointed in the least. "I know the film is as biased as all the critics say it is," Starkey, a professor at Towson University, said a few minutes before the opening of the incendiary new film at 11 a.m. at the Charles Theatre. "As far as I'm concerned, Michael Moore is the liberal answer to Rush Limbaugh and Bill O'Reilly, and I'm grateful he's there."
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