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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
Roman Polanski gives us the Dickens in Oliver Twist. He's excitingly faithful to the master British storyteller's 1838 novel about an orphan boy who escapes the workhouse only to run a fearsome gantlet of harsh legal authorities and ruthless exploiters, crooks and knaves. The result is a headlong road movie, even when the road turns into the twisting alleyways of London. Polanski and screenwriter Ronald Harwood - who won Oscars for their screen translation of The Pianist, Wladyslaw Szpilman's memoir of Nazi-occupied Poland - don't scant Dickens' humanitarian protests.
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NEWS
January 1, 2006
Poem carries whiff of anti-Semitism Despite Will Englund's attempt at cleverness, the "Merry Christmas" poem (editorial, Dec. 25), contained a reference that has been historically perceived as anti-Semitic. While lobbyist Jack Abramoff has yet to be judged, comparing him to Charles Dickens' character Fagin perpetuates stereotypes and anti-Semitism. Anti-Semitism, ingrained into Victorian English society, manifested itself in Dickens' depiction of Fagin, the head of the thieves in Oliver Twist.
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By David Zurawik | November 15, 1997
Hot on the heels of its triumph with "Cinderella," "The Wonderful World of Disney" takes on "Oliver Twist" (7 p.m.-9 p.m. tomorrow, WMAR, Channel 2) with much of the same exuberance, magic and charm.Just as Whitney Houston did in "Cinderella," Richard Dreyfuss both stars and serves as an executive producer in this production. His performance as Fagin is a magic act in that he manages to make this ancient tutor to a band of child pickpockets in Dickens' London both menacing and likable in a flim-flam-man kind of way.Almost as impressive are the performances of Elijah Wood as the Artful Dodger and Alex Trench as Oliver.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
Roman Polanski gives us the Dickens in Oliver Twist. He's excitingly faithful to the master British storyteller's 1838 novel about an orphan boy who escapes the workhouse only to run a fearsome gantlet of harsh legal authorities and ruthless exploiters, crooks and knaves. The result is a headlong road movie, even when the road turns into the twisting alleyways of London. Polanski and screenwriter Ronald Harwood - who won Oscars for their screen translation of The Pianist, Wladyslaw Szpilman's memoir of Nazi-occupied Poland - don't scant Dickens' humanitarian protests.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2005
Oliver!, the Lionel Bart musical based on Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist, can be a tough theatrical nut to crack. On one level, it comes off as a male counterpart to Annie, what with workhouse orphan boys extolling the glories of food and singing pickpockets beckoning young Oliver to consider himself one of the family. But the backdrop for it all is 19th-century London in the frightful throes of the Industrial Revolution. And as Dickens made clear for all time, neglect, exploitation, abuse and murder quickly dispel the optimism of tomorrow being only a day away - though, thank heavens, things come out right for Oliver by story's end. So we're left with a "children's show" that, in reality, is anything but, as life's darkest elements insinuate themselves into that bright, peppy score so full of hits such as "Food, Glorious Food," "Consider Yourself" and "I'd Do Anything."
NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1998
Two standout performances bring out the best in Toby's Dinner Theatre's latest production of "Oliver!," a show that's sure to have audiences asking, along with the title character, for "some more."Musicals are Toby's forte, and "Oliver!" is presented in top form, with a strong ensemble, good set and overall smooth production.Audiences who haven't seen this musical for a while will have forgotten just how many good songs there are in the 1963 Tony award winner. From "Consider Yourself," to "Reviewing the Situation," Toby's cast does not disappoint in presenting the old favorites in a familiar story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | December 30, 1994
With the return of orphanages in the news lately, the production of "Oliver!" at the Lyric Opera House is unlikely to dissuade anyone from the idea.That's because -- despite the inclusion of a murder, scenes of domestic violence and street crimes ranging from thievery to prostitution -- Lionel Bart's 1960 musical puts a cheerful, upbeat gloss on Dickens' dark melodramatic novel "Oliver Twist." This touring production, directed by Dallett Norris, upholds the musical's treacly tradition.Designer Jeffrey Schneider's set may look like a medieval torture chamber, but the children in the cast are cute and perky, whether they're playing urchins in the orphanage or urchins in Fagin's gang of pickpockets.
NEWS
January 1, 2006
Poem carries whiff of anti-Semitism Despite Will Englund's attempt at cleverness, the "Merry Christmas" poem (editorial, Dec. 25), contained a reference that has been historically perceived as anti-Semitic. While lobbyist Jack Abramoff has yet to be judged, comparing him to Charles Dickens' character Fagin perpetuates stereotypes and anti-Semitism. Anti-Semitism, ingrained into Victorian English society, manifested itself in Dickens' depiction of Fagin, the head of the thieves in Oliver Twist.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 1997
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- David Gregory was leader of the vicious Double Seal drug gang that, until early this year, dominated the heroin trade in the southern Baltimore neighborhoods of Cherry Hill and Westport, federal officials say.Baltimore homicide detectives suspect that he also may be a killer. But to a number of teen-agers both in Baltimore and in the Caribbean enclave of East Flatbush in Brooklyn, he was a modern-day Fagin."David Gregory saw himself as a godfather," says Essam Rabadi, an agent for the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | April 11, 1991
Michael Holmes continued his makeover of the Morgan State basketball program yesterday, as he signed three prospects to national letters of intent. Holmes was headed to Syracuse today, where he anticipated signing yet another player.Yesterday began the spring signing period for letters of intent. During the fall period, Morgan State got commitments from four players. Counting the four he got yesterday and today and three players who sat out last year, he will have at least 11 new faces when practice for the 1991-92 season begins next fall.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2005
Oliver!, the Lionel Bart musical based on Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist, can be a tough theatrical nut to crack. On one level, it comes off as a male counterpart to Annie, what with workhouse orphan boys extolling the glories of food and singing pickpockets beckoning young Oliver to consider himself one of the family. But the backdrop for it all is 19th-century London in the frightful throes of the Industrial Revolution. And as Dickens made clear for all time, neglect, exploitation, abuse and murder quickly dispel the optimism of tomorrow being only a day away - though, thank heavens, things come out right for Oliver by story's end. So we're left with a "children's show" that, in reality, is anything but, as life's darkest elements insinuate themselves into that bright, peppy score so full of hits such as "Food, Glorious Food," "Consider Yourself" and "I'd Do Anything."
NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1998
Two standout performances bring out the best in Toby's Dinner Theatre's latest production of "Oliver!," a show that's sure to have audiences asking, along with the title character, for "some more."Musicals are Toby's forte, and "Oliver!" is presented in top form, with a strong ensemble, good set and overall smooth production.Audiences who haven't seen this musical for a while will have forgotten just how many good songs there are in the 1963 Tony award winner. From "Consider Yourself," to "Reviewing the Situation," Toby's cast does not disappoint in presenting the old favorites in a familiar story.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | November 15, 1997
Hot on the heels of its triumph with "Cinderella," "The Wonderful World of Disney" takes on "Oliver Twist" (7 p.m.-9 p.m. tomorrow, WMAR, Channel 2) with much of the same exuberance, magic and charm.Just as Whitney Houston did in "Cinderella," Richard Dreyfuss both stars and serves as an executive producer in this production. His performance as Fagin is a magic act in that he manages to make this ancient tutor to a band of child pickpockets in Dickens' London both menacing and likable in a flim-flam-man kind of way.Almost as impressive are the performances of Elijah Wood as the Artful Dodger and Alex Trench as Oliver.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 1997
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- David Gregory was leader of the vicious Double Seal drug gang that, until early this year, dominated the heroin trade in the southern Baltimore neighborhoods of Cherry Hill and Westport, federal officials say.Baltimore homicide detectives suspect that he also may be a killer. But to a number of teen-agers both in Baltimore and in the Caribbean enclave of East Flatbush in Brooklyn, he was a modern-day Fagin."David Gregory saw himself as a godfather," says Essam Rabadi, an agent for the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | December 30, 1994
With the return of orphanages in the news lately, the production of "Oliver!" at the Lyric Opera House is unlikely to dissuade anyone from the idea.That's because -- despite the inclusion of a murder, scenes of domestic violence and street crimes ranging from thievery to prostitution -- Lionel Bart's 1960 musical puts a cheerful, upbeat gloss on Dickens' dark melodramatic novel "Oliver Twist." This touring production, directed by Dallett Norris, upholds the musical's treacly tradition.Designer Jeffrey Schneider's set may look like a medieval torture chamber, but the children in the cast are cute and perky, whether they're playing urchins in the orphanage or urchins in Fagin's gang of pickpockets.
NEWS
By Jane Lippy and Jane Lippy,Contributing writer | May 29, 1991
It's intended to be a steady diet of music and melodrama amid the abject poverty of the London underworld, as the musical "Oliver" takes the stage tomorrow and Friday at Mount Airy Middle School.In Lionel Bart's sometimes-upbeat musical adaptation of the 19th-century Charles Dickens classic, "Oliver Twist," the orphan Oliver escapes from a workhouse only to fall into the clutches of the filthy Fagin, the master of a den of young London thieves.The plot unfolds like London's byways and Dickens' novel, as Oliver gets away from Fagin and is befriended by the good Mr. Brownlow, only to be recaptured by the king of pickpockets.
NEWS
By Linda Aiken & Claire Fagin | March 12, 1993
THE United States has a shortage of primary-care physicians.This limits the options for improving access to cost-effective health care.Nurses are a national resource with the potential to meet this challenge.Since the late 1960s, federal policy has promoted two strategies increase primary care. The first included federal support for establishing a new physician specialty in family practice.It has not yet been successful. Between 1970 and 1990, the proportion of doctors in primary-care actually declined and the rate of decline is accelerating.
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