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NEWS
October 3, 2011
I applaud the editorial in the September 28 Sun, "Fixing BCCC. " I am a nine-year adjunct instructor at Baltimore City Community College and see first-hand the problems there. Adjuncts represent the largest body of employees at the college, numbering about 600 people. We are voiceless, however, as we are underpaid and underappreciated. My salary is still below $2,000 a course, even with almost 10 years of faithful teaching. We are occasionally not paid on time, with no explanations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2014
Bruce Hull and Maggie Cohen got it absolutely right in their September 18th commentary ( "UMUC should focus on education, not business" ). What they wrote is sad but true concerning the university where I taught for 20 years until late July. We faculty saw the deterioration in standards starting when former UMUC President Gerald Heeger tinkered with a plan to turn the university into a for-profit enterprise. That tinkering led to a long slow slide. Rather than fighting for student numbers by cutting costs, it should have done so by continuing to offer top-quality education.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Morgan State University's faculty has overwhelmingly voted in support of President David J. Wilson, according to figures released by the university council Friday. More than 86 percent of Morgan faculty members who participated in the vote cast ballots to signal their confidence in Wilson, who has recently come under fire from some members of Morgan's Board of Regents. In early December, the regents voted 8 to 7 behind closed doors to not renew Wilson's contract when it expires at the end of the academic year.
NEWS
By Bruce Hull and Maggie Cohen | September 18, 2014
The University of Maryland University College (UMUC) is in crisis with declining student numbers. The challenge has accelerated in the last few years, and enrollments are projected to drop another 6.5 percent this fall, greatly due to competition from "for-profit" universities and a loss of military students. Unfortunately, UMUC's long term response to this challenge has led the institution to weaken its educational standards and imitate for-profit rivals. This is seen in UMUC's 5-year campaign to make student work less costly and less difficult, reducing the distance learning term from 12 to eight weeks, jettisoning peer-reviewed textbooks in favor of a hodgepodge of Internet resources, abolishing proctored exams, allowing substantially more credits to be earned through demonstrated student "competencies," promoting classroom credit for student "life experiences," and replacing final exams with "class projects.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
The faculty at Coppin State University overwhelmingly expressed no confidence in the institution's president, Reginald Avery, in a vote taken Monday, according to letters obtained late Thursday by The Baltimore Sun. Fifty-five faculty members indicated that they are not satisfied with the leadership of Avery, who has been the school's head since January 2008. Thirteen faculty members opposed the no-confidence vote during the all-faculty meeting. "[Avery] has brought neither a clear vision of mission to CSU, nor established a coherent or viable strategic plan, nor wisely allocated resources," wrote Nicholas Eugene, the leader of the university's faculty senate, in a letter dated Wednesday to William E. Kirwan, chancellor of the state's university system.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
The vote is in: Maryland Institute College of Art 's part-time faculty have chosen to unionize as Service Employees International Union (SEIU) 500. Two weeks ago, ballots were sent out by the National Labor Relations Board to all members of the part-time faculty. There was one question on the ballot: Should MICA's part-time faculty organize itself as an independent union with the power to negotiate? The ballots arrived at the doorsteps of 350 faculty members. Voters marked the box. They put them in a provided envelope.
NEWS
By Nick Cafferky, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
A group of about 50 faculty members and students gathered Wednesday to protest the most recent round of staff cuts at Coppin State University. Five people were let go last week, workers said, increasing the total for the year to 25 layoffs and contract nonrenewals, and further straining the university administration's relationship with its staff. "As a faculty member, I find no solace or relief or comfort in seeing staff let go, especially in these perilous economic times," said Ken Morgan, an assistant professor at Coppin.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Some foreign-born students at Howard Community College enter professor Mary Beth Furst's business class, sit attentively through instruction and say next to nothing. Furst said that when they are called upon, "You would think they were going to die, because they're really uncomfortable speaking up. " She recently discovered one of the reasons behind the silence: Some students hail from countries where it is disrespectful to ask an instructor a question. Furst and other HCC faculty and staff are learning about the college's ever-diversifying student population — and coming up with better ways to break down cultural and communications gaps — through a professional development program called INSPIRES Global Perspectives.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Students, faculty and alumni rallied for Morgan State University's embattled president Thursday, protesting the board of regents' abrupt decision to not renew David J. Wilson's contract weeks after he received a positive performance evaluation. Also Thursday, the University Council, a leadership group made up of faculty, administrators and students, called for a reversal of the board's decision, saying that it violated its own bylaws by not announcing the meeting's purpose in advance and by making a binding decision behind closed doors.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
When Arundel Middle School launched its Fit Club last year, nearly three dozen students signed up to take part in a gym activity that included cardio exercises, weight training and workouts with the P90X fitness program. But many of them didn't think their teachers would show up, too. "It's kind of funny sometimes," said Arundel seventh-grader Jose Ramirez. "It's a different experience seeing them, like, work. They usually see us work a lot. " That is what Arundel Middle physical education teacher Jason Lively envisioned when he launched the Fit Club last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Michael Hersch composes music of sobering complexity -- lots of jagged melodic lines, thorny harmonies, quick-shifting rhythms. But even at its densest, his intense work communicates in a way that can make a listener feel privy to Hersch's innermost thoughts. The composer, who studied at the Peabody Institute in the 1990s and has been on the composition faculty there since 2006, is about to reveal even more of himself this week when his first work for the stage premieres at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.
NEWS
May 28, 2014
Regarding Susan Reimer 's recent column on rejected commencement speakers, what seems hard to understand is why the school committees that choose commencement speakers seem unable to find anyone on their own campuses who might have a modicum of wisdom to impart to graduates ( "It's speech season on campus - and it's notable for ones not given," May 21). That such committees have to shop beyond their college gates to find inspiration seems to indicate either the committees' lack of imagination and rigor or their campuses' complete lack of a stimulating faculty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
WQXR in New York reports that Anthony McGill, one of the most eloquent clarinetists of our day, will join the New York Philharmonic in September as principal. McGill has been co-principal clarinetist of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for a decade and a Peabody Conservatory faculty member since 2008. There is extra interest in the Philharmonic post since McGill is the third musician to be hired since the retirement, after six decades, of Stanley Drucker in 2009. The first two accepted the position, but subsequently changed their minds.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Adjunct faculty members at the Maryland Institute College of Art voted to unionize this week, creating the first union representing part-time faculty members at any four-year college in the state. The MICA adjuncts began organizing in March amid dissatisfaction with what some lecturers called shaky job security and insufficient wages. Mailed-in ballots were tallied at the board's Baltimore office Tuesday by a representative of the National Labor Relations Board, with witnesses from MICA's administration and the part-time faculty committee observing the process.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
I. William Lustbader, a retired Polytechnic Institute mathematics teacher, died of congestive heart failure April 15 at his Delray Beach, Fla., home. The former Northwest Baltimore resident was 98. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Hosiah Lustbader, who owned a hardware and home furnishings store later razed for the state office complex. He was born at home above the store. His mother, Mollie Lustbader, was a homemaker. His parents were from Eastern Europe. He was a 1932 graduate of City College, where he ran track.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
The vote is in: Maryland Institute College of Art 's part-time faculty have chosen to unionize as Service Employees International Union (SEIU) 500. Two weeks ago, ballots were sent out by the National Labor Relations Board to all members of the part-time faculty. There was one question on the ballot: Should MICA's part-time faculty organize itself as an independent union with the power to negotiate? The ballots arrived at the doorsteps of 350 faculty members. Voters marked the box. They put them in a provided envelope.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
Dr. Alan Ross, a longtime faculty member of the Johns Hopkins University whose love of numbers fed his career and also an enjoyment of baseball, died Sept. 7 at Roland Park Place. He was 87. He was born in Oxford, Ohio, to E.C and Madeliene Ross, and raised in both Oxford and Hamilton, Ohio, where his extended family lived. His father was an English professor at Miami University. Family members say as a youngster, Dr. Ross showed a predilection for learning, winning several state mathematics awards in school.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
A University of Maryland program that matches researchers with companies has awarded $4.1 million to 15 teams working to bring technology products to market. Baltimore-area companies that will work with faculty through the Maryland Industrial Partnerships program include Columbia-based A&G Pharmaceutical Inc., which will receive $203,161 to conduct a clinical study on a blood test for early breast cancer screening, and Baltimore-based Rehabtics LLC, which is developing a software system for physical rehabilitation video games.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Dr. M. Daniel Lane, a retired Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researcher, biochemist and esteemed teacher who studied the body's chemical processes that affect hunger, died of myeloma April 10 at the Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Mount Washington resident was 83. Colleagues said he typically arrived at his classroom at 6 a.m. and filled numerous sliding blackboards with notes for the day's material. These became known as the "Lane Lectures. " Dr. Paul Rothman, chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Dr. Lane "a premier scientist and one of our most cherished colleagues.
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