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Factory Orders

BUSINESS
May 2, 2004
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Monday * Auto and truck sales for April * Construction spending for March * Institute for Supply Management index for April Earnings reports Bally Fitness, First Health, John Hancock, MetLife, Priceline.com, Principal Financial Tuesday * Factory orders for March Earnings reports Clear Channel, Dean Foods, Hewitt Associates, Northrop Grumman, Qwest, Safeway, Tyco, DirecTV, Hartford Financial, Prudential Wednesday Earnings reports CVS Corp.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - An index of U.S. service industries rose to a record level last month, and the value of factory orders in December increased to the highest level in three years, suggesting that the economy has been strengthening since the fourth quarter. The Institute for Supply Management's index for non-manufacturing businesses increased to 65.7 from 58 in December, the biggest gain since the survey's inception in July 1997 and exceeding forecasts. Since April, the gauge has stayed above 50, signaling expansion.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - U.S. service industries expanded at a faster rate last month, and September factory orders rose for a fourth time in five months amid signs that the economy is adding jobs at a quicker pace. The Institute for Supply Management's index of nonfactory businesses climbed to 64.7, the second-highest level on record, from 63.3 in September. Readings higher than 50 indicate growth. Orders at U.S. factories rose 0.5 percent in September, the Commerce Department said. A gauge of employment in the service index rose to the highest level since November 2000, prompting economists at UBS Securities LLC to more than double their estimate for October's employment report, to a gain of 125,000 jobs.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
President Bush expressed confidence yesterday that the economic recovery is picking up steam, a development that could prove crucial to his re-election hopes. Statistics released yesterday spotlight the challenge Bush and the economy face, however. Productivity grew remarkably in the second quarter, but new claims for unemployment benefits climbed to the highest level since the middle of July. An economic boom that doesn't lower the 6.2 percent unemployment rate is considered a likely political loser.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2003
In a sign that the economy's problems are far from over, the nation's unemployment rate rose to 6.0 percent in April as businesses lopped thousands of workers from their payrolls for the third month in a row, the Labor Department reported yesterday. The unemployment number, a key barometer of the health of the economy, tied an eight-year high for the second time in five months as it rose from 5.8 percent in March. The unemployment rate also was 6.0 percent in December, and the last time it was above that was July 1994, when it was 6.1 percent.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 7, 2003
WASHINGTON -Productivity, a measurement of how much a worker produces in an hour, rose at a 0.8 percent annual rate from October through December, the Labor Department reported yesterday. That compared with the government's previous estimate of a 0.2 percent decline. For all of last year, productivity rose 4.8 percent, the most since Harry Truman was president in 1950. In another report, the Labor Department said initial unemployment claims unexpectedly rose 12,000 to 430,000 in the week that ended Saturday.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 4, 2002
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy showed several signs yesterday that it is recovering. Services such as retailing and banking, the biggest contributor to gross domestic product, expanded for a fifth month in June; factory orders rose for a third month in May; and claims for unemployment benefits declined last week to the lowest level since the recession began in March 2001. "In manufacturing and call centers, we've seen excellent growth," said Jamie Parker, a senior vice president at Adecco SA in Rochester, N.Y. The Swiss company is the world's largest temporary-employment agency.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 3, 2002
WASHINGTON -- New orders at U.S. manufacturers rose in March, and claims for unemployment benefits fell to the lowest level in five weeks, suggesting that a factory rebound and a stabilizing job market will underpin the recovery. The 0.4 percent increase in factory orders, to $318.5 billion for the month, followed a 0.2 percent rise in February, the Commerce Department said. Excluding transportation industries, orders rose for the first time since December. The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits fell by 10,000 last week, to 418,000, the fewest since March 23. That led investors to expect last month's employment report, due out today to show a gain in jobs for the second month in a row. Demand is starting to improve at producers such as Dow Chemical Co., which makes plastics and chemicals used in industries ranging from homebuilding to health care.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2002
Economic indicators Monday: February construction spending Tuesday: February factory orders Thursday: Weekly jobless claims Friday: March unemployment Wednesday Executives Association of Baltimore luncheon meeting, noon, Cross Keys Inn, 5100 Falls Road, Roland Park. Nonmember cost is $20. For reservations, call Bob Hodges at 410-465-8029.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 25, 2000
WASHINGTON - U.S. factory orders for aircraft, electrical equipment and other durable goods showed their largest-ever decline in July, the government said yesterday in a report suggesting that manufacturers might scale back production in the months ahead as the economy slows. Orders for big-ticket items plunged 12.4 percent last month, more than reversing a June increase of 9.5 percent, the Commerce Department said. Excluding transportation equipment, orders fell 4.8 percent in July after rising 0.5 percent the month before.
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