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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Household products maker Sun Products Corp. said Tuesday it wants to sell its Baltimore manufacturing plant, which ceased operations in June. The property was valued at $10,414,500 by the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation on Jan. 1. The company, the maker of products such as Dove and Snuggle, said in February it would close the facility, where it made fabric softener and liquid detergents, and lay off about 300 workers. In its announcement, it cited the age of the Holabird Avenue complex as a reason for moving operations to Kentucky.
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NEWS
By Matthew Wellington and Robert S. Lawrence | October 1, 2014
Science tells us that the overuse of antibiotics is leading to "super bugs," bacteria that are increasingly difficult if not impossible to kill with antibiotics. The biggest users — and arguably abusers — of antibiotics are large-scale industrial farms. More than 70 percent of antibiotics are used on livestock and poultry, and at many facilities, antibiotics are fed to animals that aren't sick. This enables the animals to grow faster and lets them stay healthy despite cramped, confined quarters where bacteria abound.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | February 23, 2010
Northeast Foods of Baltimore, a commercial bakery owned by the Paterakis and Tsakalos families of Maryland, plans to build a $25.4 million bakery in Clayton, N.C. North Carolina Gov. Bev Perdue and Northeast President Bill Paterakis announced Monday that Northeast will begin construction of the 80,000-square-foot facility this summer and open it in spring 2011. Expected to create 84 jobs over the next two years, the project will bring to six the number of states in which Northeast operates a baking facility, after Maryland, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Virginia.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | August 12, 2014
Philadelphia-based Delancey Street Capital said Tuesday it bought the Sail Cloth Factory apartments near the University of Maryland, Baltimore for $12.9 million last month, the firm's fourth acquisition in the city. Delancey Street President Daniel Kline said he was drawn by the 107-unit building's prime location, as well as lower rents that he said make the property stand out. One bedroom apartments at the Sail Cloth Factory start around $1,110, but rates in nearby buildings that have been more recently renovated often start several hundred dollars higher.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
A large, two-alarm fire burned in an abandoned lacrosse ball factory in Kingsville on Monday afternoon, bringing between 80 and 100 firefighters to the scene, according to a Baltimore County fire spokesman. The old factory belonged to the Belko Corp., a rubber manufacturer, but has been abandoned for years, said Lt. Paul Massarelli, the spokesman. Fire personnel were first dispatched to the factory, near the intersection of Jericho Road and Woodberry Place in the Franklinville area, about 3:35 p.m., he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TEXT BY MICHAEL OLLOVE and TEXT BY MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
The Broom Factory has never been a risk to win any architectural awards. Hulking above the eastern regions of the harbor, it is a sloppy assemblage of boxy, mismatched red-brick structures resembling something put together by a child at the very beginning of a building-blocks career. A child without much artistic promise. And yet, the fact that the Broom Factory continues to exist at all as it approaches its 100th anniversary is one of those marvels of urban adaptability and regeneration that make cities such curious organisms.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | January 28, 2012
Lion Brothers is outsourcing again. Unpaid child laborers will design one of the Owings Mills company's newest embroidered emblems. That's a good thing, in this case. If the factory of the future is about fast turnarounds on custom orders produced close to the customer, Lion Brothers' new Girl Scout badge is a small but telling indicator that U.S. manufacturers might have a place in the global economy after all. President Barack Obama's blueprint for reviving American factories should help retain and perhaps create manufacturing jobs at the margins.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | January 3, 1995
Walking amid hundreds of sewing machines crammed together as a jackhammer pounds away, Edward Zitka surveys the transformation of London Fog Corp.'s last U.S. factory."
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1995
A Taneytown men's clothing factory that has been gathering dust and deteriorating since it closed nearly four years ago is scheduled for conversion to a warehouse and possibly offices."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | November 7, 1991
All the bluish carpet tacks sold nationally by Woolworth and WalMart stores pass through the hands and grocery scales of 11 women at a venerable East Baltimore plant.They hand-pack tacks at the Holland Manufacturing Co., better known around Little Italy as the "Tack Factory," at Bank Street and Central Avenue.Just a handful of blocks away from stylish Inner Harbor apartments, one of the few surviving downtown manufacturing plants turns out tons of brads, tacks and nails in little bright blue and yellow pasteboard boxes.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Household products maker Sun Products Corp. said Tuesday it wants to sell its Baltimore manufacturing plant, which ceased operations in June. The property was valued at $10,414,500 by the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation on Jan. 1. The company, the maker of products such as Dove and Snuggle, said in February it would close the facility, where it made fabric softener and liquid detergents, and lay off about 300 workers. In its announcement, it cited the age of the Holabird Avenue complex as a reason for moving operations to Kentucky.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | June 10, 2014
As an all-county baseball player at Columbia's Atholton High School and a two-year starter at the University of Pennsylvania, Steve Sclafani had hopes of being drafted by a Major League team after college. That didn't happen, so he returned to Howard County and took a marketing job with the Patuxent Publishing Co. But Sclafani wasn't quite ready to quit the game he'd loved since elementary school. So in 1994, a year after graduating from Penn with a communications degree, he started the Baseball Factory, a business aimed at helping high school baseball players - like himself a few years earlier - make it as college players.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
John Ostrowski, a renowned Southeast Baltimore sausage maker who refused to sell his product to supermarkets for wider distribution, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Somerford Place Assisted Living in Columbia. The Lutherville resident was 72. "As soon as you step through the front door of 524 S. Washington St., it hits you: the spicy, smoky, garlicky and altogether unmistakable smell of tradition," said a 2005 Baltimore Sun article about Mr. Ostrowski and his family business, Ostrowski's Famous Polish Sausage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Orrell's Maryland beaten biscuits won't be making their annual appearance on Thanksgiving tables this year. The factory that makes them has been closed since the death of its owner, Herman Miller "Dick" Orrell III. Orrell, whose mother, Ruth, started the factory, died Sept. 5 at age 83. Orrell's operated out of a 100-year-old house in Wye on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Beaten biscuits are so named because in days when yeast and other leavening agents were scarce, bakers would beat the dough with the handle of an ax or hammer to make the dough rise.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | November 20, 2013
Walmart just reported shrinking sales for a third straight quarter. What's going on? Explained William S. Simon, the CEO of Walmart, referring to the company's customers, "Their income is going down while food costs are not. Gas and energy prices, while they're abating, I think they're still eating up a big piece of the customer's budget. " Walmart's CEO gets it. Most of Walmart's customers are still in the Great Recession, grappling with stagnant or declining pay. So, naturally, the company's sales are dropping.
NEWS
By John R. Breihan | August 26, 2013
From Michigan comes the news that the Willow Run bomber factory outside Detroit is to be demolished. One of the best-known factories that transformed the United States into "the Arsenal of Democracy" during World War II, Willow Run is also said to be the home of the iconic "Rosie the Riveter" image of women who flocked to the war plants to make up for the men who joined the armed forces. Built in 1941-42 and designed by the noted factory designer Albert Kahn, the Willow Run plant was a spectacular work of architecture.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
Marian G. Day, a retired factory supervisor and Hampden resident, died Friday of heart failure at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 77. She was born Marian Griner in Cape May Court House, N.J., the daughter of vaudevillians. "Our parents were in vaudeville and traveled the East Coast. In the winter, we lived in Carney," said her sister, Dorothy J. Smith of Haines City, Fla. Mrs. Day attended Baltimore County public schools. "In those days, after you left Parkville Junior High School, you went to Towson High School.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Timothy J. Mullaney and Alec Matthew Klein and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. finally pulled the trigger yesterday on the long-speculated closing of its Hampstead sewing factory, a decision that the retailer said will create "substantial savings" but eliminate about 100 workers from the payroll.The 35,000-square-foot factory, which manufactures suit jackets and sports coats, will close in early February and may be sold or put to some other use.Already, 28 employees have been transferred to the company's tailoring division. The other workers will receive what was described as standard severance packages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Forget the stars. The people I always wanted to talk to were the writers and producers who created the fictional worlds that became long-running TV series. One of the great pleasures of this job in my earlier days on the beat was going out to California, breaking away from my colleagues on the press tour and spending a long afternoon in a producer's bungalow on a studio backlot as he or she told me and my tape recorder how their visions became prime-time series. Whether it was Steven Bochco talking about “Hill Street Blues” or Larry Gelbart explaining the history of “M*A*S*H,” I always felt as if I was being let in on a great secret as to how entertainment, culture and sometimes even art was improbably created in the hyper-commercial world of Hollywood.
EXPLORE
June 17, 2013
Students at Ring Factory Elementary School in Bel Air recently took part in the annual Junior Achievement program, learning real-life business and financial lessons, as taught by parent volunteers, regular teachers, and employees of Freedom Federal Credit Union. The program was delivered on April 25 with each class taking part in five educational sessions geared to students in kindergarten through fifth grade. This is the sixth year Freedom has supported the Junior Achievement (JA)
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