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By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | November 26, 2006
Last Sunday, The Sun began a three-part series about a drug used by American military doctors in Iraq that could be killing some of the very soldiers it was intended to save. The drug, Factor VII, helps doctors stop blood flow from devastating wounds, but there is abundant evidence that the drug may later cause blood clots that result in heart attacks and strokes. The series, "Dangerous Remedy," was reported and written by Robert Little and photographed by Monica Lopossay. It represents exceptional enterprise reporting.
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NEWS
By Robert Little, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
The medical questions about the Army's use of Factor VII, its one-time wonder drug, have largely been resolved by the scientific evidence: Yes, it is potentially dangerous. No, it doesn't seem to work. But to critics of the drug's use, some practical questions remained. Such as: Why was an obscure and extremely expensive hemophilia drug embraced by Army leaders as a treatment for combat injuries? And why was it injected into thousands of wounded troops and civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan despite a near-complete lack of evidence that it was safe or saved lives?
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NEWS
By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | November 21, 2006
When the drug known as Recombinant Activated Factor VII arrived on the American market in 1999, it seemed destined for obscurity. Made by the Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk and sold under the name NovoSeven, it was approved only for treating "bleeding episodes" in people with rare forms of inherited hemophilia, making it useful to about 3,500 people around the world. A different fate was set in motion that same year at a medical conference in Israel, when trauma specialists for the American and Israeli militaries decided that the drug might save wounded soldiers on the battlefield.
NEWS
By Robert Little, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
Federal criminal investigators are exploring the Army's use of a controversial and expensive blood-clotting drug injected into wounded troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. The drug, called Factor VII, was hailed as a lifesaving breakthrough by military leaders and administered to hundreds of soldiers and Marines earlier in the wars. It has since proved largely ineffective in clinical trials and been the subject of safety warnings by U.S. and European regulators, who say it can cause potentially deadly blood clots.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun reporter | November 30, 2006
Two U.S. senators called on the Pentagon yesterday to investigate the military's use of a largely experimental blood-coagulating drug that doctors inject into wounded troops to control bleeding but that has been linked to unexpected and potentially deadly blood clots. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski sent a letter yesterday to Dr. William Winkenwerder Jr., the assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, asking him to launch an investigation into use of the drug, called Recombinant Activated Factor VII. She urged him to "immediately review the use and effects" of Factor VII to determine whether its potential risks outweigh its benefits.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN REPORTER | November 19, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq // American military doctors in Iraq have injected more than 1,000 of the war's wounded troops with a potent and largely experimental blood-coagulating drug despite mounting medical evidence linking it to deadly blood clots that lodge in the lungs, heart and brain. The drug, called Recombinant Activated Factor VII, is approved in the U.S. for treating only rare forms of hemophilia affecting about 2,700 Americans.
NEWS
November 21, 2006
Army doctors have been administering to badly wounded soldiers a powerful drug that they believe saves lives, because it stops bleeding. Yet the after-effects may include unexpected clots, which when they break free days or even weeks later can end up killing some of those same soldiers. Reporter Robert Little's three-part series in The Sun, which concludes today, raises two crucial questions about the drug, Recombinant Activated Factor VII: What's its benefit in terms of lives saved? And what's the cost, in later strokes and heart attacks?
NEWS
By Robert Little, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
Federal criminal investigators are exploring the Army's use of a controversial and expensive blood-clotting drug injected into wounded troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. The drug, called Factor VII, was hailed as a lifesaving breakthrough by military leaders and administered to hundreds of soldiers and Marines earlier in the wars. It has since proved largely ineffective in clinical trials and been the subject of safety warnings by U.S. and European regulators, who say it can cause potentially deadly blood clots.
NEWS
By Robert Little, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
The medical questions about the Army's use of Factor VII, its one-time wonder drug, have largely been resolved by the scientific evidence: Yes, it is potentially dangerous. No, it doesn't seem to work. But to critics of the drug's use, some practical questions remained. Such as: Why was an obscure and extremely expensive hemophilia drug embraced by Army leaders as a treatment for combat injuries? And why was it injected into thousands of wounded troops and civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan despite a near-complete lack of evidence that it was safe or saved lives?
NEWS
December 2, 2006
Young voters faced problems at polls It was great to see the column by Ray Martinez III and Avi Rubin on voting problems nationwide ("Voting system still needs fixing," Opinion Commentary, Nov. 28). But it should be noted that the problems here in Maryland were almost as severe. In Maryland, many young voters began experiencing problems well before they reached the polls. The voter registration forms require an ID number. While many voters use their driver's license number, the form says a voter can also use the last four digits of his or her Social Security Number as identification - and many students who do not have a Maryland driver's license do so. The state, unfortunately, did not process some of the forms that used the last digits of the Social Security Number in time for the election.
NEWS
December 2, 2006
Young voters faced problems at polls It was great to see the column by Ray Martinez III and Avi Rubin on voting problems nationwide ("Voting system still needs fixing," Opinion Commentary, Nov. 28). But it should be noted that the problems here in Maryland were almost as severe. In Maryland, many young voters began experiencing problems well before they reached the polls. The voter registration forms require an ID number. While many voters use their driver's license number, the form says a voter can also use the last four digits of his or her Social Security Number as identification - and many students who do not have a Maryland driver's license do so. The state, unfortunately, did not process some of the forms that used the last digits of the Social Security Number in time for the election.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun reporter | November 30, 2006
Two U.S. senators called on the Pentagon yesterday to investigate the military's use of a largely experimental blood-coagulating drug that doctors inject into wounded troops to control bleeding but that has been linked to unexpected and potentially deadly blood clots. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski sent a letter yesterday to Dr. William Winkenwerder Jr., the assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, asking him to launch an investigation into use of the drug, called Recombinant Activated Factor VII. She urged him to "immediately review the use and effects" of Factor VII to determine whether its potential risks outweigh its benefits.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | November 26, 2006
Last Sunday, The Sun began a three-part series about a drug used by American military doctors in Iraq that could be killing some of the very soldiers it was intended to save. The drug, Factor VII, helps doctors stop blood flow from devastating wounds, but there is abundant evidence that the drug may later cause blood clots that result in heart attacks and strokes. The series, "Dangerous Remedy," was reported and written by Robert Little and photographed by Monica Lopossay. It represents exceptional enterprise reporting.
NEWS
November 21, 2006
Army doctors have been administering to badly wounded soldiers a powerful drug that they believe saves lives, because it stops bleeding. Yet the after-effects may include unexpected clots, which when they break free days or even weeks later can end up killing some of those same soldiers. Reporter Robert Little's three-part series in The Sun, which concludes today, raises two crucial questions about the drug, Recombinant Activated Factor VII: What's its benefit in terms of lives saved? And what's the cost, in later strokes and heart attacks?
NEWS
By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | November 21, 2006
When the drug known as Recombinant Activated Factor VII arrived on the American market in 1999, it seemed destined for obscurity. Made by the Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk and sold under the name NovoSeven, it was approved only for treating "bleeding episodes" in people with rare forms of inherited hemophilia, making it useful to about 3,500 people around the world. A different fate was set in motion that same year at a medical conference in Israel, when trauma specialists for the American and Israeli militaries decided that the drug might save wounded soldiers on the battlefield.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN REPORTER | November 19, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq // American military doctors in Iraq have injected more than 1,000 of the war's wounded troops with a potent and largely experimental blood-coagulating drug despite mounting medical evidence linking it to deadly blood clots that lodge in the lungs, heart and brain. The drug, called Recombinant Activated Factor VII, is approved in the U.S. for treating only rare forms of hemophilia affecting about 2,700 Americans.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Pfc. Caleb A. Lufkin landed on the helipad at about 12:30 p.m., screaming at the sky as a small all-terrain vehicle carried him past the palm trees and concrete bunkers to the emergency room. Doctors inside cut off his blood-covered boots and prepared to sedate him and insert a breathing tube, and he pleaded with them to keep him alive. "Don't let me die," he said. "I won't let you die," answered Capt. David Steinbruner, an Army doctor. "I promise. I give you my word."
NEWS
By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,robert.little@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
BAGHDAD -The U.S. Army has quietly altered or abandoned some of its more experimental medical treatments for troops injured in combat, as advances it once hailed as groundbreaking are found largely ineffective or perhaps even dangerous. Advanced battle dressings, a blood-clotting drug, alternative procedures for emergency blood transfusions - each was introduced early in the Iraq war, often with little evidence to support them beyond anecdotes or tests on animals. A few were adopted widely by civilian hospitals, based almost exclusively on accolades from the military.
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