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By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | January 13, 1994
For three years, they called Pat Troy "Madame President," and it was more than a title.As the grand dame of the Greater Severna Park Council, she united often disparate factions within the community association, forging the group into a strong political force in Anne Arundel County.Tuesday evening, she presided over the meeting that elected Ellen McGee-Keller her successor. Three years as head of the council, Ms. Troy decided, was enough."You get tired. You start to burn out," said Ms. Troy, 47. "I think people become itchy for something new, and I think it's important for the council's health not to be identified with any one individual for too very long."
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 8, 1994
ZAGREB, Croatia -- In a warning to the factions in Bosnia that the time for a settlement is running out, France announced yesterday that it had asked the United Nations and NATO to draw up detailed plans for the withdrawal of peacekeepers from the war-ravaged country."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1993
GENEVA, Switzerland -- Striving to negotiate an end to the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina before winter sets in, international mediators presented a draft peace accord to Bosnian Muslim, Serb and Croat leaders yesterday and gave them 10 days in which to accept or reject it.Slobodan Milosevic, Serbia's president, and Franjo Tudjman, Croatia's president, who joined the peace talks Thursday, immediately backed the plan. Leaders of Bosnian Serbs and Croats said they had reservations, although they indicated that they were willing to accept it.The Bosnian Muslim delegation, headed by President Alija Izetbegovic, said last night that they were "not satisfied with what we have been offered" and complained that under the draft agreement "the Serbs will not give up ethnically cleansed territories which were taken by force."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | August 15, 1992
HOUSTON -- If you listen to Elsie Hillman, President Bush's assignment at this convention sounds simple enough. "He has to give them a reason," she says, "just a glimmer of a reason."Elsie Hillman is a friendly witness. As a member of the Republican National Committee from Pennsylvania, she has been a longtime supporter of George Bush and is serving again this year as chairman of his campaign in her home state.But even a Republican with that history is willing to concede that the president "is not there yet" in making a convincing case to his party, let alone the electorate at large.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 3, 1992
NEW YORK -- The needle on the pander meter was quivering deep within the red zone as Jerry Brown wooed the Jews yesterday."I support the $10 billion loan guarantee for Israel without conditions!" he told the Jewish Community Relations Council in Manhattan."I have worked intimately with AIPAC [American-Israel Public Affairs Committee]! Under me California led the way in condemning compliance with the Arab boycott! I opposed the sale of the F-15s; I opposed the sale of the AWACS [to Saudi Arabia]
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
Only good could come from people of all faiths speaking wit one voice against the hostilities in Bosnia, a local Muslim leader believes.But it is not happening -- not in Baltimore, not anywhere.The failure of the different religions to present a united front TTC against the war in the Balkans is being traced to a variety of causes: summer vacations, preoccupation with other problems, the escalation of ethnic fears and hostility, denials of responsibility.Imam Mohammad Bashar Arafat of the Islamic Society of Baltimore thinks it's time to overcome those obstacles.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 9, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Some of his fellow moral crusaders express disappointment that William J. Bennett admits to big-bucks gambling and a high-roller life at big-time casinos. I'm disappointed that he's giving it up. After all, Mr. Bennett pointed out when first confronted with his expensive hobby that his gambling apparently was legal, harmless to his family and between him and other consenting adults. I would be delighted to let Mr. Bennett, former secretary of education and author of the best-selling Book of Virtues, gamble all he wants without a peep of protest, if he would just give Sen. Rick Santorum and other modern-day Puritans a spirited Bennett-style lecture on the virtue of staying out of other people's personal business.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1990
MOSCOW -- The KGB, traditionally distinguished by monolithic loyalty to the Soviet leadership, is showing increasing signs of splitting into pro-reform and anti-reform factions under pressure from media scrutiny and a multiparty system.A small but growing number of current and former officers of the powerful intelligence and security agency are going public with criticism of its operations, while the KGB brass continues to insist that no internal reform is needed."Unquestionably, there has appeared a division within the KGB," said Alexander A. Milchakov, a Moscow journalist who has regular contact with KGB employees in his research on mass graves of victims of Stalin-era executions.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | July 16, 1995
BERLIN -- If the United Nations departs from Bosnia, that country will be left to complete its suicide unhindered and unattended by the outside world, with only its resident Muslims, Serbs, and Croats present to divvy up the corpse.That is the legacy facing the United Nations after more than two years of troubled involvement as a would-be peacekeeper.The Bosnian Serbs' capture last week of a U.N. "safe area" for Muslims -- the enclave of Srebrenica -- has at last forced the stay-or-leave decision long avoided by the United Nations, Europe and the United States.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 2007
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli army struck a three-member Palestinian rocket-launching cell near Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip yesterday, first with tank shells and then from the air, an army spokesman said. Residents said that the three were shepherds and that three other people had been wounded, Reuters reported. Hours later, the Palestinian faction Hamas claimed responsibility for firing an anti-tank missile at an Israeli army bulldozer that was accompanying tanks stationed in Gaza, close to the border with Israel.
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